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View Poll Results: Anxiety before retiring
No anxiety - 25 30.12%
Some anxiety - continued to work although plenty of money to retire 14 16.87%
Some anxiety - retired anyway (what was I concerned about) 40 48.19%
I thought this was a poll on poles again 4 4.82%
Voters: 83. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-06-2011, 10:07 AM   #21
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1. The social side
I know it seems strange to many here, but that's my biggest fear too. None of my friends will be retired. I don't need constant companionship, but I need to stay social. I am planning on joining in activities that I might not have when I was working.
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Old 02-06-2011, 10:52 AM   #22
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Anxiety? nah...at least not related to the FIRE process. I had too many
other sources of anxiety to deal with.

I had a Plan A to do an early out at age 50 with 20 years. Life happened, so I used 2.5 years to put Plan B into action. I essentially "stuck it out" while I increased my TSP principal to a value I was comfortable with. I used online retirement calculators frequently and consulted with a trusted personnel specialist. I made some key changes to my retirement portfolio.

I kept my eye on the ball. When I requested and was denied a lateral transfer to escape an antagonist, I happily put in my resignation letter with 6 weeks until blastoff. Johhny Paycheck would have been proud.
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Old 02-06-2011, 10:56 AM   #23
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I answered, "No Anxiety" but I did have a few but fleeting tense moments in late 2008 in the weeks surrounding my ER.

The first was waiting to see the quarterly update to my company stock's value (9/30/2008) following a big drop in the market earlier that month amidst the accelerating financial crisis. For the first time ever, the announcement of the new price got delayed one day. This made me a little nervous because I would be cashing out this stock to provide me funds whose dividends after investing them would cover my monthly expenses. If the price dropped a lot, could I still go through with the resignation? From my read of the memo, it did not appear the price would take a huge hit. And I could always withdraw my resignation if I had to. My next day in the office would not be for 3 more days, though. Anyway, the price dropped by only 1% which was fine.

The second was making that walk to my boss's office. I actually wanted to tell the man who headed my division but he had not yet returned from a meeting, so I had to tell his two immediate subordinates (my direct supervisors) instead, a somewhat tougher task because I liked working for them more than the head honcho. It felt somewhat surreal but I got through it fine.

The next temporary bit of anxiety was waiting for the funds from the 401(k) and ESOP to arrive, as I had provided lengthy and complex instructions as to how to distribute the company stock, pretax contributions and earnings, and after-tax contributions (they received and understood all the faxed instructions perfectly, which was quite comforting). One was a check and the other via electronic payment. The former took about 7 days while the latter took about 4. The following week I went to visit my Fidelity rep to set up the IRA and the taxable bond fund. Handing over two checks worth over $500,000 made me feel pretty powerful, too.

When the stock and bond markets hit bottom in March, 2009, I became a little nervous but things did turn around soon enough.
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Old 02-06-2011, 12:41 PM   #24
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Absolutely no anxiety - unless that's the term you use to describe the feeling of a five year old kid as Christmas approaches.
Not there yet, but having some anxiety as the time approaches, slowly but surely being replaced by that Christmas feeling.

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I gave my checklist to Nords, so he could worry for me about my retirement.
Nords, I need to send you my checklist.
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Old 02-06-2011, 01:02 PM   #25
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Am I the only one who's known since they were in their early 20s they would retire in their mid-50s?

My dad retired in his mid-50s because he simply wanted to enjoy life. He wasn't a wealthy man. He had a pension, retiree health insurance, and eventually social security. He took an occasional consulting job and spent most of his time fishing. I saw how much he enjoyed having the freedom to do things he enjoyed while still young and healthy and I knew I wanted the same opportunity.

I had 30 years to make my plan happen. One year before I hit the double-nickel we put the last of the plan in place - we bought a place in the country. Six months later I sold the house in the megacity. Then I got lucky. I was able to take all of my accrued leave prior to my birthday. There's nothing better than getting a regular paycheck every two weeks for four months while sitting on the porch drinking a cold beer. Then the pension kicked in.

Fast forward five years and I still think early retirement has been the best career decision I've ever made.
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Old 02-06-2011, 01:10 PM   #26
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No stress at all. I had hit FI in 2004, but since work was going so smoothly I worked (programmed) an extra 2 years before retiring when things finally started going south. By that time I had much more $$ than I needed. I had always been sure of the non-$$ part, as I had wanted to retire since I was a child. The last 4 years have confirmed this.
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Old 02-06-2011, 01:11 PM   #27
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I had some anxiety, but mine was more to do with the anticipation. I was taking a pension and even though I would have less money in retirement, I had adjusted spending to compensate, mainly paying off my vehicles. That caused a little stress, but no big deal.

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Am I the only one who's known since they were in their early 20s they would retire in their mid-50s?
It was more knowing for the last twenty years that I was going to retire in July 2010. That coupled with a bad situation at work made me want to get out of there so badly. I think the anxiety was more the fact I couldn't do anything to get out earlier. I had to wait and put up with the BS. The countdown just go to me. It seemed to take forever. I was so stressed I got a case of the shingles!

Now, 7 months later, it seems like a lifetime ago. Even though I have teenagers at home and we haven't been able to follow are dreams as of yet, it is still nice to not have to go to work. On the rare occasions when I think about it, it makes me smile.
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Old 02-06-2011, 01:28 PM   #28
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Almost there. Been planing ER for past decade. Set target of 50th B-day which is now April 2011 due to the melt down. New Target 51st b-day. Anxious yes. Been running Fire calc and other caculators and setting up the financial side and fairly confident. Applied for LTC insurance and have shopped HC insurance and concerned weather they will give us coverage due to some past health issues. If we get coverage then we shall go for it.
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Old 02-06-2011, 02:07 PM   #29
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Yes, I had anxiety. My main concern--which to some degree is still a concern--was financial. Would I have enough money for my wife and me to live to a ripe old age in comfort and in the relatively high standard of living to which we were accustomed. I am happy to report that after 2.5 years, all is going well--financially, socially, emotionally, intellectually, and spiritually. I have learned that I didn't need to have as much anxiety about finances as I did. Heck, we probably won't even tap into our retirement savings until I turn 70.5 and the government makes me take money out.
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Old 02-06-2011, 09:06 PM   #30
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A little anxiety here, but lessened when i remind myself that we do not need our current take home pay - only enough to pay the bills plus some.

Reading Retire Happy Wild and Free (which i learned about on this forum) helped loads. The retirement counselor came around for her yearly visit and mentioned that her DH had (unexpectantly) passed away in November and she would give anything if she had retired 5 years ago. She is 61 now and retiring in May.

...so many signs once i started watching for them.
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Old 02-06-2011, 09:20 PM   #31
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I have been easing into retirement cutting my hours which are now just under 20/week.
There has been some anxiety each time I lopped off another 10 hours/week which is about 20/k per year.

I find that I am compensated by the milestones such as my daughter graduating from college and now on her own, my son just turning 18 and almost done with high school.
The anxiety seems to diminish as I have less responsibilities.
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Old 02-07-2011, 04:52 AM   #32
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I haven't ER'd yet, but soon - I'm surprised that I'm not anxious. I'm more anxious about going into work every day.
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Old 02-07-2011, 06:08 AM   #33
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I believe we are probably FI enough, but not RE yet. So I did not vote. I find I have quite a bit of anxiety about the finances even though the math tells me I probably have sufficient. I don't worry too much about the social and emotional aspects, but my DW is concerned for me. She is concerned that due to my high profile position, the fast pace, the travel, the demands on my time, and the responsibility/authority I have, that I may be easily bored. Her concerns don't usually bother me, but every once in a while, I get a cold chill when I think about that in combination with my (most likely undue) concern about finances. I stay primarily because of succession planning. The biggest issue there will be complete in 23 months. I will then begin to ease into RE while part-timing a portion of my role. But, the closer it gets, the more anxious I get...for now. Maybe as the cash stash builds, and as I get down towards the end of the 23 months the anxiety will begin to ease. We'll see. Ask again in 20 months or so.

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Old 02-07-2011, 07:11 AM   #34
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I'm still going through the anxiety now, even though things have turned very much to the better. As of a month ago my plan was to give three weeks notice on April 1 of this year. Firecalc showed I was in a safe zone, with the largest question being health insurance, but I felt I had built in enough of a cushion to handle that. Then low and behold, my wife finds a great job with decent pay and full benefits - after being unemployed over 3 1/2 years. She still wants me to retire and she plans on working 5 or 6 more years. With her new pay we'll have a 0% SWR for a while!!!! I don't know why I'm still nervous. I guess I'm still hoping to get the miraclulous RIF severance package. Anyway, I decided to cut the date by an extra month so I only have 3 or 4 weeks left to hang in there......
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Old 02-07-2011, 07:24 AM   #35
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some anxiety due to megacorp being sold several times the last five years. Each time the pension formula changed just a little. Got out at first chance and took the cash balance due to mistrust issues.
Lucky for us we had two people working at the same goal and we knew to the penny how much cash we spent each year and had no debt so plenty of wiggle room to adjust the budget.
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Old 02-07-2011, 08:39 AM   #36
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Some, but very little, anxiety. I planned well & was confident that it was time.
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Old 02-07-2011, 08:46 AM   #37
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I have been easing into retirement cutting my hours which are now just under 20/week.
There has been some anxiety each time I lopped off another 10 hours/week which is about 20/k per year.
Same here. I reduced my weekly hours from F/T to 20 back in 2001, and most of those hours were telecommuting. My take-home salary took a 40% cut. In 2003, the telecommute part ended, so I had to do my lousy commute more often. In 2007, I reduced my weekly hours from 20 to 12, shaving one day off my commute and getting home a little earlier. My take-home pay took another hit, and most of the few remaining bennies I had went away.

I thought the 12-hour week would save me but that lasted only for 17 months, as the rest of the financial puzzle fell into place and I ERed in late 2008, sick and tired of the commute even 2 days a week. When I got home that final day, I was "Free At Last!"
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Retired in late 2008 at age 45. Cashed in company stock, bought a lot of shares in a big bond fund and am living nicely off its dividends. IRA, SS, and a pension await me at age 60 and later. No kids, no debts.

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Old 02-07-2011, 09:02 AM   #38
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....my DW is concerned ......that due to my high profile position, the fast pace, the travel, the demands on my time, and the responsibility/authority I have, that I may be easily bored.
My staff said the same thing of me. That it would be impossible for me to slow down, would wind up working just to work, easily bored.... didn't happen. To be fair, we retired to our ranch so there's always something to do. Or not. These cold days it's more of a "not".

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I stay primarily because of succession planning.
I had my succession planning in place at least two years before my departure. I was hoping the megacompany would offer me an incentive to leave earlier than my planned date - didn't happen.

You may find yourself walking into work one day and thinking you just don't want to do this any more. That's when you know you're ready for retirement.
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Old 02-07-2011, 09:05 AM   #39
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You may find yourself walking into work one day and thinking you just don't want to do this any more.
That happened to me from day one. Every day - well, except for paydays...
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Old 02-07-2011, 09:45 AM   #40
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You may find yourself walking into work one day and thinking you just don't want to do this any more. That's when you know you're ready for retirement.
Bingo! This was published the day I gave my 2 weeks notice.
Non Sequitur Comic Strip, February 18, 2008 on GoComics.com

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