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Old 02-18-2009, 10:34 AM   #81
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He just made 1LT and he's spending 2009 (maybe part of 2010 too) in Iraq.... He says that stock markets are among the least of his worries these days.
Yep. The military can often be a lot like real estate - it's all a matter of location, location, location.
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Old 02-18-2009, 10:52 AM   #82
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Yep. The military can often be a lot like real estate - it's all a matter of location, location, location.
Hmmm - after three tours of Iraq the black sheep of the family(M^*ine) is in Afgansitan. Wife got out of the Navy and bought them a house in 2007 in - drum roll please - California!

A place which 'could' replace New York City!' in future Pace Picante Sauce ads.

I don't suppose I'll get a royalty out of that idea.

Hey - this market may grind out so long - I'll take 'Bull' anyway I can get it.



heh heh heh -
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Old 02-18-2009, 11:14 AM   #83
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I run into a lot of people in my line of work.

It's downright AMAZING how many people think investing in todays stock market is suicide. I was talking to an accountant yesterday who says he doesnt even put money into his 401k any more---he cant "take it' any more. He seemed to be about 35. A mortgage broker, age 40?, literally laughed at me when I told him I was still investing regularly in my Roth. Not chuckled....LAUGHED "hahahaha, you must want to get slaughtered huh? I will never, EVER be investing in stocks for as long as I live...it's stupid"


ummm....yeah
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Old 02-18-2009, 11:27 AM   #84
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Buffett and Munger should be calling the voices in my head telling me to get out on Halloween 2007. Maybe they would have acted on it, unlike me...
Ah, yes, how well I remember Hallowe'en, 2007. I moved every taxable cent I had from money market into the Vanguard 500 VFINX on that day.
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Old 02-18-2009, 11:34 AM   #85
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If I knew I was going to places where a significant number of people that don't like me have automatic weapons, RPGs and high explosives, the stock market wouldn't be my biggest concen either. Being young and effectively with no savings also reduces his market worry.

I have significant assets and hope to live off them soon. No one has shot at me for years. Therefore, I am worried about the market.
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Old 02-18-2009, 11:35 AM   #86
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I run into a lot of people in my line of work.

It's downright AMAZING how many people think investing in todays stock market is suicide. I was talking to an accountant yesterday who says he doesnt even put money into his 401k any more---he cant "take it' any more. He seemed to be about 35. A mortgage broker, age 40?, literally laughed at me when I told him I was still investing regularly in my Roth. Not chuckled....LAUGHED "hahahaha, you must want to get slaughtered huh? I will never, EVER be investing in stocks for as long as I live...it's stupid"


ummm....yeah
I hear the same things. I've read a book that talks about the "I can't take it anymore" investment philosophy. The market goes down until the person "Can't take it anymore" and he sells. Then after it's been going up a lot, and everyone is making money he "Can't take it anymore" and jumps in.

----------------

How many of you are thinking "As soon as the market recovers, I'm going to decrease my stock allocation percentage"?
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Old 02-18-2009, 11:56 AM   #87
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I'm putting every penny I can into stocks right now. Despite only making $45K-ish per year I already maxed my Roth for the year, i'm putting in enough per pay period to reach $16,000+ in my 401K and i'm putting another $500/mo into a taxable account at Vanguard. I may even w*rk voluntary overtime if it's available(which I never do) so I can sustain this level of saving. The last thing i'd want to do now is stop investing.
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Old 02-18-2009, 12:10 PM   #88
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I'm putting every penny I can into stocks right now. Despite only making $45K-ish per year I already maxed my Roth for the year, i'm putting in enough per pay period to reach $16,000+ in my 401K and i'm putting another $500/mo into a taxable account at Vanguard. I may even w*rk voluntary overtime if it's available(which I never do) so I can sustain this level of saving. The last thing i'd want to do now is stop investing.
Aaron, that is wonderful!! It sounds to me like you are well on your way to retirement, young dreamer or not. Your net worth ought to be pretty substantial in 10-15 years, at that rate.
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Old 02-18-2009, 12:17 PM   #89
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Perhaps another small sign that the turnaround is near:

New lessons from the crash - Feb. 17, 2009
The last line of this "noisy" article says it all, IMO:

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So you don't want to risk more money than you can truly afford to lose.
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Old 02-18-2009, 12:30 PM   #90
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I run into a lot of people in my line of work.

It's downright AMAZING how many people think investing in todays stock market is suicide. I was talking to an accountant yesterday who says he doesnt even put money into his 401k any more---he cant "take it' any more. He seemed to be about 35. A mortgage broker, age 40?, literally laughed at me when I told him I was still investing regularly in my Roth. Not chuckled....LAUGHED "hahahaha, you must want to get slaughtered huh? I will never, EVER be investing in stocks for as long as I live...it's stupid"


ummm....yeah
Same here. Most everyone I know is disgusted with the stock market and has cashed out at a big loss. They swear they'll never invest money in the stock market again. They probably do think I am dumbsh*t for investing more money in stocks (buying low is such a crazy idea!). Oh well, we'll see who turns out to be the genius in 10-15 years. I hope it will be me!

Anyways, at our current savings rate we will reach FIRE in 2024 (when we'll be 50) even if the stock market returns 0% real from here on out (and I am excluding merit pay increases beyond COLA, promotions, bonuses, and stock options from my projections, i.e. I assume that, at age 35, we have reached the peak of our careers). So from my point of view, the only "risk" I am taking by investing in the market during this difficult time is finding myself FIREd much sooner than expected. That's a risk I am willing to take...
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Old 02-18-2009, 12:42 PM   #91
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....Really it's the combination of a crashing market and a terrible employment situation which form the unsettling one-two punch. Either one by itself wouldn't alarm me, but both together (as usually happens, unfortunately) are scary.
Yes, very very scary along with depressed real estate prices all over, not to mention various bailouts.

Ziggy, you keep mentioning Halloween '07 which was the day I decided to take two months away from the forum because I was spending too much time here, hearing too much financial "noise."

Going back to "are there any bulls left?," would any of us be more bullish if we looked at losses compared to cost and time rather than paper highs?

Can you slice the timeline to make it look a lot better? About half of what I lost was bought in the '80s--lower cost; the rest in the year 2008--short term losses but if I look long term, it can go either way, we don't know the future, and that is always scary.

There were fears of draught here but the last week has brought the area up to 100% of usual rain fall, hope the fact that the sun came out here means the rain is headed your way.
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Old 02-18-2009, 12:53 PM   #92
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I run into a lot of people in my line of work.

It's downright AMAZING how many people think investing in todays stock market is suicide. I was talking to an accountant yesterday who says he doesnt even put money into his 401k any more---he cant "take it' any more. He seemed to be about 35. A mortgage broker, age 40?, literally laughed at me when I told him I was still investing regularly in my Roth. Not chuckled....LAUGHED "hahahaha, you must want to get slaughtered huh? I will never, EVER be investing in stocks for as long as I live...it's stupid"


ummm....yeah
thefed, it really is 1972 all over again! I feel young again. The expression then was, "you will lose your shirt," and I, like you, did a full-scale rebellion and went ahead and quietly invested, 100% equities, in small increments. In retrospect many of those people never did invest; I knew one who lived very very frugally.
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Old 02-18-2009, 12:55 PM   #93
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If I knew I was going to places where a significant number of people that don't like me have automatic weapons, RPGs and high explosives, the stock market wouldn't be my biggest concen either. Being young and effectively with no savings also reduces his market worry.

I have significant assets and hope to live off them soon. No one has shot at me for years. Therefore, I am worried about the market.
Somewhere in between the two of you lies a happier medium.

Would it help to run scenarios through FinancialEngines.com or ESPlanner?

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How many of you are thinking "As soon as the market recovers, I'm going to decrease my stock allocation percentage"?
"I'm going to take some off the table... and this time I really mean it!!"

A couple years ago it felt really stupid to be putting a cash stash in those measly 6.25% PenFed CDs when the market was returning double digits.
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Old 02-18-2009, 01:10 PM   #94
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I'm hedging my bet. DW and I max our 401k's in 2030 lifecycle funds, and the rest of our aftertax money goes into the bank---CD's. One way or another, we should get it right.
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Old 02-18-2009, 02:06 PM   #95
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Nords, congrats on your nephew's making 1lt (first lieutenant to us in the non-military world, right?), and bless him for his service to us.

This article (Abandon all hope ye still awaiting market rebound, then healing can begin -- chicagotribune.com) in this morning's Tribune struck me--she's saying (I think) that the markets can't recover until there's more negativism. So quit being so optimistic, you guys!!!

(a) If overoptimism is on the way out, Hickey [cofounder of Bespoke] said, the market may be entering a more subdued period that is a precursor to healing. "When you are always hoping for the best, you tend to be disappointed when you don't get it," he said.

so that's good.

but (b): a recent survey of investor sentiment showed a roughly 50-50 split between bears and bulls. Truly negative sentiment would require a lot more pessimists.
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Old 02-18-2009, 02:27 PM   #96
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How many of you are thinking "As soon as the market recovers, I'm going to decrease my stock allocation percentage"?
Well, if you are rebalancing you will do this naturally! Yep, I look forward to rebalancing when the market recovers a significant amount.

On the negativism - this is the most negative I have ever seen things in the last 10 years. Way more negative than the dot com crash. It's so negative, that the market news anchors get mad or argue ferociously if anyone dares say anything remotely positive.

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Old 02-18-2009, 02:36 PM   #97
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I'm happy with my 45:55 equities:fixed AA. Couldn't be happier.

What DOESN'T make me happy is what this stupid recession has done to my portfolio despite that great AA!!!

I wouldn't want less in equities. That would kill me if the market ever heads back upwards again.
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Old 02-18-2009, 02:37 PM   #98
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Well, if you are rebalancing you will do this naturally! Yep, I look forward to rebalancing when the market recovers a significant amount.

On the negativism - this is the most negative I have ever seen things in the last 10 years. Way more negative than the dot com crash. It's so negative, that the market news anchors get mad or argue ferociously if anyone dares say anything remotely positive.

Audrey
If you are in it for the long haul, and don't need immediate or the money within 5 years, then I would say buy. It's simply a dip in our history, a blip on the screen, things do change regardless of how bad they seem

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Old 02-18-2009, 03:02 PM   #99
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On the negativism - this is the most negative I have ever seen things in the last 10 years. Way more negative than the dot com crash. It's so negative, that the market news anchors get mad or argue ferociously if anyone dares say anything remotely positive.
I think part of that is because in that bear market, diversification worked like a charm even if you stayed mostly in equities. This time, all equities are getting squashed like a bug with nearly 100% correlation. I'm sure in the end it will be a great time to buy if you can get past all the noise.
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Old 02-18-2009, 03:12 PM   #100
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I think part of that is because in that bear market, diversification worked like a charm even if you stayed mostly in equities. This time, all equities are getting squashed like a bug with nearly 100% correlation. I'm sure in the end it will be a great time to buy if you can get past all the noise.
And not just equities - - a lot of bond funds aren't looking too sharp compared with a year ago, too. I happen to be the not-so-proud owner of such a fund and it does not make me happy!!

And need I even mention the housing market?
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