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Average Age of Retirement Rising
Old 07-07-2014, 05:35 PM   #1
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Average Age of Retirement Rising

The average retirement age continues to rise.

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The average age at which U.S. retirees report retiring is 62, the highest Gallup has found since first asking Americans this question in 1991. This age has increased in recent years, while the average age at which non-retired Americans expect to retire, 66, has largely stayed the same. However, this age too has slowly increased from 63 in 2002.
Average U.S. Retirement Age Rises to 62

Anyone want to help the average drop in 2014?

It's interesting that the younger generations see themselves as wanting to retire earlier. It will take a lot of fiscal discipline given how sophisticated marketers are these days at making you itch and offering to scratch.
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Old 07-07-2014, 05:39 PM   #2
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The rise is a short-term effect because some folks who planned to retire in 2008-2010 didn't until their portfolios recovered. I think all is well now and the number (avg retirement age) will promptly drop.

I think this year may turn out to be a record in terms of number of people retiring what with the holdbacks, the market recovery, and the ACA. There are starting to be media reports to that effect.
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Old 07-07-2014, 05:48 PM   #3
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^ this and the fact that most early retirements are health related - people are living healthier so they are retiring later
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Old 07-07-2014, 05:54 PM   #4
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It'll be interesting to see the effects of 401ks and IRAs have on the retirement age in the future as the number of pensions continues to decline into nothing. I feel like there are more tools to get to early retirement than ever before but there's also more personal responsibility than ever before.
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Old 07-07-2014, 07:00 PM   #5
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I retired last Friday at 56 so that should help lower the average a little......
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Old 07-07-2014, 07:19 PM   #6
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For the reasons given by previous posters, plus...

the average is skewed by all those bloggers claiming to be retired in their 30's, while their spouses work (because they want to of course), and they earn income from their blogging, and other activities that most of would call 'work'.

-ERD50
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Old 07-07-2014, 07:22 PM   #7
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In Australia they are raising the age at which social security are available to 70 years and they are talking about raising the age at which people can access their private pensions to 65 or 70.

The Government wants people to work longer.

I am certainly not planning on hanging around that long - fortunately my retirement planning does not include any social security.
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Old 07-07-2014, 07:39 PM   #8
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^ this and the fact that most early retirements are health related - people are living healthier so they are retiring later
Maybe so for the population at large. I doubt that most ER's that regularly post here did so because of health reasons. Well maybe to escape the stress from work...
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Old 07-07-2014, 08:57 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by aim-high View Post
The average retirement age continues to rise.

Average U.S. Retirement Age Rises to 62

Anyone want to help the average drop in 2014?
I volunteer to suffer for the cause and retire 7 years younger than that come September.
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Old 07-07-2014, 09:03 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by ERD50 View Post
For the reasons given by previous posters, plus...

the average is skewed by all those bloggers claiming to be retired in their 30's, while their spouses work (because they want to of course), and they earn income from their blogging, and other activities that most of would call 'work'.

-ERD50
Oh no. Here we go for another 50 posts on the definition of retired.
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Old 07-08-2014, 07:12 AM   #11
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This is surprising and some what perplexing to me. The stock market has been on such a roll since 2009 that I would think more people would be retiring earlier! I guess most people just lack the discipline to save and invest enough to make it happen. Saving enough to retire by 55 doesn't even seem that hard or something that would require a lot of effort. I am on pace for about 51 and I kick myself constantly about my mistakes early in life that have me working this long.
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Old 07-08-2014, 07:29 AM   #12
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skyvue - Unfortunately most Americans don't own stock (or even mutual funds):

"Just 15 percent of [American] families directly owned stocks in 2010, according to a 2012 report from The Federal Reserve. ... In fact, the majority of Americans have no money in the stock market at all, including retirement accounts. Some 53 percent of Americans avoid the market completely, according to a Pew Research survey last year.

"The richer and more educated people are, the more likely they are to invest in the stock market. Some 80 percent of households earning $75,000 a year or more are in stocks, including retirement accounts, Pew found, while just 15 percent of those earning less than $30,000 have invested."

Stocks soar, and most Americans just don't care - CBS News
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Old 07-08-2014, 07:55 AM   #13
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Interesting, how much these polls tend to vary. I've heard that the actual retirement age has hovered around 62 for awhile now, and no matter how long people think they're going to work, something still happens, such as a layoff, caring for a loved one, failing health, etc. People might be living longer, but I was under the impression that they're still phasing out of the workforce about the same age they've always done.

As for younger generations wanting to retire early, heck, they're the ones I've been hearing mention "Oh, I'll just work longer if I can't afford to retire!"
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Old 07-08-2014, 07:55 AM   #14
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skyvue - Unfortunately most Americans don't own stock (or even mutual funds):

"Just 15 percent of [American] families directly owned stocks in 2010, according to a 2012 report from The Federal Reserve. ... In fact, the majority of Americans have no money in the stock market at all, including retirement accounts. Some 53 percent of Americans avoid the market completely, according to a Pew Research survey last year.

"The richer and more educated people are, the more likely they are to invest in the stock market. Some 80 percent of households earning $75,000 a year or more are in stocks, including retirement accounts, Pew found, while just 15 percent of those earning less than $30,000 have invested."

Stocks soar, and most Americans just don't care - CBS News
I just saw a program on the news this weekend that said 53% of American are invested in the stock market. That would include mutual funds in 401k's, etc... Ironically, there are some Americans so clueless that they do not even know they have money in the market!

P.S. I would be one of those Americans who do not own any individual stocks, but I have almost a million in the "stock market" via mutual funds. I think the semantics are key here.
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Old 07-08-2014, 08:02 AM   #15
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Unfortunately, my retirement will be over the average. I discovered I was FI in 2005 when I started lurking here. I became a congenital OMY-er. Much of it was initially due to my DW's parents health/care issues where, if retired, I would have been much more involved in whether I wanted to be or not. The last 3 years have been more staying out of loyalty to my boss because we've been pretty busy at the company and I make a pile of money for doing a pretty easy/low stress job.

I'm not one of the posters here that have 8 figure portfolios but I've got a decent stash. A big part of my situation is based on a nice but not extravagant lifestyle. It's now obvious that I'm just working for my grandchildren's inheritance. Every variation of calculator I use has my retirement spending above my current salary which I don't come near to spending now. If I traveled more maybe I could spend it all but DW says we're doing all the traveling she wants to do now.
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Old 07-08-2014, 08:24 AM   #16
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Unfortunately, my retirement will be over the average. I discovered I was FI in 2005 when I started lurking here. I became a congenital OMY-er. Much of it was initially due to my DW's parents health/care issues where, if retired, I would have been much more involved in whether I wanted to be or not. The last 3 years have been more staying out of loyalty to my boss because we've been pretty busy at the company and I make a pile of money for doing a pretty easy/low stress job.

I'm not one of the posters here that have 8 figure portfolios but I've got a decent stash. A big part of my situation is based on a nice but not extravagant lifestyle. It's now obvious that I'm just working for my grandchildren's inheritance. Every variation of calculator I use has my retirement spending above my current salary which I don't come near to spending now. If I traveled more maybe I could spend it all but DW says we're doing all the traveling she wants to do now.
While I suppose I helped lower the average slightly, I've always been just a bit sheepish about claiming "early" retirement at 58. Still, I WAS FI at 51, so I'll assuage my conscience with that fact. I continued to w*rk because I suddenly found my self in a situation I really enjoyed - something I had w*rked toward my whole c@reer. The day my w*rk situation changed negatively, I began the retirement process (notice, paperwork, etc.) So I think there are many reasons the average retirement age is rising. To my own surprise at the time, enjoying what you do is one possible reason - though I suspect that is a minority reason. YMMV
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Old 07-08-2014, 08:30 AM   #17
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Average U.S. Retirement Age Rises to 62

Anyone want to help the average drop in 2014?
I did it at 55 (working part-time since 47). My wife at 50. Was that helpful enough?

Or do you want me to fund my children so they also go straight into ER before 30? They are working now.
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Old 07-08-2014, 09:32 AM   #18
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Or do you want me to fund my children so they also go straight into ER before 30? They are working now.
If I had been given my current assets at age 30, I wouldn't have had a clue what to do with it. I probably would have been scammed and lived a bit too large until it was gone. There is a definite value to having the patience and developing the skill set to save a reasonable nest egg.

Now if someone (you, perhaps? ) would suddenly make me a deca-millionaire, I think I'd be able to live my life and manage the assets without screwing everything up.
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Old 07-08-2014, 09:37 AM   #19
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Maybe so for the population at large. I doubt that most ER's that regularly post here did so because of health reasons. Well maybe to escape the stress from work...
definitely a fact for the population at large - most early retirements are health related
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Old 07-08-2014, 09:45 AM   #20
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...Now if someone (you, perhaps? ) would suddenly make me a deca-millionaire, I think I'd be able to live my life and manage the assets without screwing everything up.
Me, a decamillionaire? I wish. But same as you, I think I can manage even a bigger stash without screwing it up. So far, nobody gives me a chance, and I do not think I can get there by myself. But I am not starvin'...

Anyway, it is true that I wish my children will get to be well-to-do before we croak and leave them with money, so that they know how not to blow it.

PS. By the way, I do not have enough to fund my children's ER and ours too. Not at the lifestyle that they would like anyway!
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