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Old 08-16-2012, 08:32 PM   #21
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Flooring? With glass, I'd planned to treat it like additional indoor space and get laminate flooring that resembles the hardwood in the house. What works best with screens besides brick and cement? I'm not feeling outdoor carpet but will consider it.
There is a plank flooring product, Foresta, that looks and installs like laminate, but it is 100% PVC. It can be used around pools and spas, etc, so it sounds like it would be okay in your application. It was about $8 sq/ft when I priced it a few years ago. Installation looks easy, like laminate. I don't know how well it would hold up in the sun--you've have to be sure it has UV stabilizers. Also, PVC expands quite a bit with temperature, so I don't know how it would fare in a spot that got direct sun--it could buckle unless it's got room to move. Lastly, there's the issue of "appropriateness". It might not bother some folks, but this product is trying to look like a hardwood floor, and a hardwood floor doesn't look right in a spot were it's exposed to rain.
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Old 08-16-2012, 09:32 PM   #22
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Flooring? With glass, I'd planned to treat it like additional indoor space and get laminate flooring that resembles the hardwood in the house. What works best with screens besides brick and cement? I'm not feeling outdoor carpet but will consider it.
We went with outdoor carpet to hide the crappy concrete foundation, but we end up replacing it every 4-6 years. It's either fading or water from the sprinklers, and occasionally damage from pets.

There's a plastic flooring called "Konekto" that lays down with interlocking adhesive tabs. It wears like iron, but the floor has to be relatively flat with decently smooth joints.
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Old 08-17-2012, 04:13 AM   #23
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Here tiles looking like wood have come up. Some are very nice.
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Old 08-17-2012, 12:19 PM   #24
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(snip)Flooring? With glass, I'd planned to treat it like additional indoor space and get laminate flooring that resembles the hardwood in the house. What works best with screens besides brick and cement? I'm not feeling outdoor carpet but will consider it.
Ceramic tile?
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Old 08-17-2012, 12:28 PM   #25
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I had a pergola built on my deck and had these attached
Canopies | Retractable Deck Awnings | ShadeTree® Canopies. They really cut down on the sun and are easy to retract when not in use.My SO & I installed them .
Thanks for posting that link. Good idea, and gives me something to think about.
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Old 08-17-2012, 06:29 PM   #26
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I'll be interested to see how this project turns out. I have a similar problem with my deck...sun beats down on it in the afternoon and evening, although there is a momentary reprieve in the later afternoon as it passes behind a Maple tree.

I'm thinking of just going a cheaper, basic route though. Put up a framework, and then attaching some shade netting, both to the sides and roof. I figure that way it'll still get some sun for the plants, and rain, but it'll cut down on the full force of the sun. Won't do anything for bug protection though, and I doubt that what I want to do would fly in most neighborhoods that have an HOA!

Anyway, good luck with your project. Personally, it sounds to me like you can afford it.
I also went the cheaper route. Currently enclosing aluminum patio cover.

Paid, approx. $2400 for aluminum patio cover.

Bought 2 x 4 Home Depot/Lowes. (lumber quality very poor nowdays).
(lumber warped and twisted).

Bought, 2 six foot and 1 eight foot sliding door. Home Depot. approx. $1400.

South facing, got very hot under the Aluminum roof.

Just installed the reflective
foil. 2 layers of foil with plastic bubble in between. 4 ft x 50 ft, Amazon.
Foil does work, which surprised me.

12 x 16 feet, size of patio. Doing work my self, when I have the time. If you
are handy, you can save a lot my doing it yourself.

By using store bought sliding doors, they come with screens, and are "e" coated, it does keep the sun out.

Still not finished yet, .....Figure, will have spent at most, $5000 in materials when I am finished.
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Old 08-18-2012, 05:55 AM   #27
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We had a 16' X 16' screened in porch but it was very dusty and sandy all the time so it was not used much (we live near the beach). So my wife decided we should close it in as a more usable part of the house. A year after I finished enclosing the porch she decided we needed a screen porch. So I worked on a simple 3 sided design to attach one to the rest of the back of the house. Code said the concrete footers had to be deeper for screen than for an enclosed structure so I changed the plan for a glassed in sunroom. Had a 12' X 24' slab poured. It was an easy frame with 4" X 4"s and filled in the long wall with double glazed sliding glass door replacements and the ends with 6' sliding glass doors. The eaves hang over enough to prevent direct sun from heating it too much during the summer but allows it to come in during the winter so we have passive solar working to our advantage. The ceiling is insulated and I installed a small rarely used air conditioner unit in one end wall. Tiled the floor so it is easy to keep clean. I didn't keep records but I'm sure it was no more than $10k total expense.

Cheers!
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Old 08-18-2012, 12:29 PM   #28
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I'm planning to sign up for a ~$20K contract.
  • Screened in 10X16
  • 7X8 additional concrete slab in front of current slab for grilling/sitting
  • 3X3 slab on the right side
  • shed shingled & insulated roof - 18 inch eaves
    (30"-36" eaves would make it cooler but would take out more sun from the family room behind that sliding patio door.)
  • 2 skylights over the existing patio door to bring light back in (and help warm it up in the colder months).
  • Ceiling fan on the right side
It would cost me a little more for the ceiling fan, put down the laminate flooring and stamp the concrete slabs.
I talked to this architect who graciously gave me some ideas -- hiring him to design it would cost more than the enclosure.

I should have asked him this:
What if I put glass on the right side ONLY? I know it would eliminate the cross breeze with the windows open but it would help keep the area cleaner and warmer in the colder months.

Has anyone here done a combination of screen and glass?
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Old 08-18-2012, 12:31 PM   #29
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We had a 16' X 16' screened in porch but it was very dusty and sandy all the time so it was not used much (we live near the beach). So my wife decided we should close it in as a more usable part of the house. A year after I finished enclosing the porch she decided we needed a screen porch.
This so reminds me of this blog.
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Old 08-18-2012, 01:22 PM   #30
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I didn't read all of the above comments but looking at the picture shown early on, it reminds me of the 4 season sun room my parents added to their house about 10 years ago. It is one of those with glass on the sides and curved over the lower side of the roof. They loved it but to heat it and cool it added about $300 per month to their utility bill. Just too much glass for weather ranging from -10 in the winter to 100 in the summer.

If it is to be used 4 seasons and if you get extreme temperatures you may want to consider something with a normal type roof over it with appropriate overhang on the eves. Lots of high efficiency windows would be great and still have that wide open view.
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Old 08-19-2012, 03:12 PM   #31
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Privacy ideas are needed. On the right side of the enclosure, I'd like to block out my unfriendly neighbors.
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Old 08-19-2012, 05:28 PM   #32
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[*] Ceiling fan on the right side
Check into a ceiling fan using a DC motor. They electronically rectify the AC voltage into the fan, so it converts to DC with very high efficiency and very low power consumption. It's more expensive but it's also EnergyStar so your local state or utility may give you a rebate.

But it's a better idea to spend extra money on roof insulation and reflective shingles. That way the ceiling fan doesn't have to deal with hot air in the first place.

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Originally Posted by Beryl View Post
I should have asked him this:
What if I put glass on the right side ONLY? I know it would eliminate the cross breeze with the windows open but it would help keep the area cleaner and warmer in the colder months.
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Privacy ideas are needed. On the right side of the enclosure, I'd like to block out my unfriendly neighbors.
If you use windows, you could go with double-pane low-e tinted glass. You could see out but they'd have a hard time seeing in unless you were backlit.

Another option would be ol' fashioned venetian blinds.
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Old 08-19-2012, 05:42 PM   #33
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Thanks. Shades or blinds will work fine.

BTW, the Champion salesman "loved" your suggestions. He had to address each point.

I'm still debating on using glass at all. I probably won't and just enjoy the porch in the winter with socks, blankets, hotter tea, and a radiant heater.
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Old 08-30-2012, 09:26 AM   #34
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Contract signed with Champion.

Fully glassed-in (with screens) in 10x16 patio room, skylights, shingled shed roof with extra 7x8 concrete slab - ~ $24K. Visited with neighbor with similar South-facing room using the same vendor and was convinced that this is the best way to go for almost year-round enjoyment. I'll post pics when completed.
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Old 08-30-2012, 09:28 PM   #35
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Make sure the ground around the new patios (and even old if you can get to them) is compacted well. My patio has sunk about four inches so far because the dirt was not compacted well when the house was built.
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Old 08-31-2012, 01:55 AM   #36
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Congratulations. Looking forward to the pics.
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Contract signed with Champion.

Fully glassed-in (with screens) in 10x16 patio room, skylights, shingled shed roof with extra 7x8 concrete slab - ~ $24K. Visited with neighbor with similar South-facing room using the same vendor and was convinced that this is the best way to go for almost year-round enjoyment. I'll post pics when completed.
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Old 08-31-2012, 02:39 PM   #37
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Make sure the ground around the new patios (and even old if you can get to them) is compacted well. My patio has sunk about four inches so far because the dirt was not compacted well when the house was built.
Thanks. Will add this to my list.

The existing patio has been in place for over 20 years. Should that help?
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Old 08-31-2012, 06:26 PM   #38
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The existing patio has been in place for over 20 years. Should that help?
It's the extensions that might move or sink.

If they're not attached to the original structure (and they probably will not be) and if they're not supporting roof pillars or other loads (other than a BBQ grille and some chairs) then you should be fine.
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Old 08-31-2012, 07:34 PM   #39
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Make sure the ground around the new patios (and even old if you can get to them) is compacted well. My patio has sunk about four inches so far because the dirt was not compacted well when the house was built.
This is difficult to fix after the fact. When houses are built the builders typically just dump the soil back in and don't compact it well. The proper way to do this would be to dump the dirt back in in small amounts and compact it after every 4-6" of loose soil. It's not practical to compact it after all the soil has been dumped into the trench around the foundation. This soil settling is one reason for damp basements in many homes-- the soil next to the basement over the years and the top of the soil ends up sloping back toward the house, and that's where the runoff settles.
If the house has been in place for 20 years, it's probably done settling. Disturb the soil as little as possible when you lay the new foundation or piers for the patio, and be sure they pack things down well before adding the fill. Also, while they may want to use pea gravel or other smooth gravel (it can be cheaper in some places and is easier to move with a rake), the foundation and slab will be less prone to further settling if they use sharper stones that lock together more effectively ("limestone 411," "chips and dust" or other sharp crushed rock fill). On top of all the fill and just before they pour concrete they should put in heavy plastic to reduce the chances that moisture from a fully saturated soil will be pulled up into your concrete slab. This only costs a few dollars. Lastly, make sure you specify that you want the soil compacted around the foundation when they are done and the final grade should slope away from the foundation for 15' minimum at slope of at least 1/2" to 1" per foot.
Finally, they'll have some big digging equipment out there for this project--they'll be tearing up the yard. But if there are other projects around your house that might require use of such equipment (drains, re-grading of portions of the yard, etc) you can save money by getting this done while the heavy iron is already there. Finally, they will probably have extra concrete--got a use for it? It might not be much, but if there's a small project (a pad for the trashcans, a small step off of an existing porch, etc) this is a good way to get it filled. They'll be happy to have a place to put the extra concrete and it is much easier than mixing the stuff yourself with bags of Sakrete.
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Old 08-31-2012, 09:13 PM   #40
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.... I don't travel much since the bed bug outbreak in hotels a couple of years ago. Therefore, I want my home to be very comfortable.

ER, Can I afford it?
Seriously, you cannot afford not to do it.
Besides, everyone likes a good project thread. Sounds like you are well on your way!
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