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Old 10-09-2012, 11:51 AM   #21
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Our hurricane prep: move to a place 1,000 miles from the nearest coast. Enjoy life.
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Old 10-09-2012, 11:54 AM   #22
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Our hurricane prep: move to a place 1,000 miles from the nearest coast. Enjoy life.
Ditto for forest fire prep. Move 1000 miles away from any large forested areas that can become dry tinder during any drought. Enjoy life.
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Old 10-09-2012, 12:06 PM   #23
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Ditto for forest fire prep. Move 1000 miles away from any large forested areas that can become dry tinder during any drought. Enjoy life.
Touche. We live within the Denver metro area and nowhere near the forested edges. I figure that if my area gets hit by a forest fire it will mean that the whole city is gone and I have much bigger problems than the house burning down.
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Old 10-09-2012, 12:09 PM   #24
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You need a hobby - preferably one not involving, guns, knives, or explosives...
Dang. I was just considering a hobby where I'd build guns full of explosives that shoots knives. A Discovery Channel or Travel Channel show is a practical certainty.
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Old 10-09-2012, 12:10 PM   #25
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There's no practical way to prepare for everything, but seems wise to me to have some cash on hand in case ATMs go down. If you want additional protection without bulk or risk of inflation keep a few gold coins handy too.
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Old 10-09-2012, 01:32 PM   #26
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Our hurricane prep:

3. Leave when no electricity is available (but not before).

Works extremely well so far every time.
Seems like that might cut it a tad close if a Katrina is bearing down on you and thousands of cars are already on the highways. I would definitely need an ice cooler full of med's to handle that situation.
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Old 10-09-2012, 01:42 PM   #27
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Touche. We live within the Denver metro area and nowhere near the forested edges. I figure that if my area gets hit by a forest fire it will mean that the whole city is gone and I have much bigger problems than the house burning down.
I have been to Denver. Not too many trees until one gets pretty far from the city center. Still, that does not mean one cannot have brush fire.

You want real forest fire? Look up the Rodeo-Chediski fire that consumed real trees, more than 700 sq.mi. of them. In comparison, Rhode Island is only 1000 sq.mi. Amazingly, there are plenty of forests left, not just burned stumps, for me to ride my motorcycle through to explore.

Anyway, another problem is water, but ejman already extended me an invitation. I even learned that his well is only 70ft deep, not the depth of the wells here or in Texas.

Yep, that's another sign of problem. People have to drill deeper for water now than they used to do for oil. We're toastally doomed!
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Old 10-09-2012, 02:01 PM   #28
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I have been to Denver. Not too many trees until one gets pretty far from the city center. Still, that does not mean one cannot have brush fire.

You want real forest fire? Look up the Rodeo-Chediski fire that consumed real trees, more than 700 sq.mi. of them. In comparison, Rhode Island is only 1000 sq.mi. Amazingly, there are plenty of forests left, not just burned stumps, for me to ride my motorcycle through to explore.

Anyway, another problem is water, but ejman already extended me an invitation. I even learned that his well is only 70ft deep, not the depth of the wells here or in Texas.

Yep, that's another sign of problem. People have to drill deeper for water now than they used to do for oil. We're toastally doomed!
Eh, I have a camper with gear for at least a few days sitting in the driveway. If necessary, I will hitch up and split. Drive 100 miles east and there really isn't even brush to burn.
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Old 10-09-2012, 02:10 PM   #29
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Drive 100 miles east and there really isn't even brush to burn.
True. But make sure you have enough water.

But to the NW (was it in the Rocky Mountain NP?), the bark beetles already got most of the trees. Oops, those dead trees are of course tinder, a real fire hazard. I would be very worried.
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Old 10-09-2012, 02:19 PM   #30
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True. But make sure you have enough water.

But to the NW (was it in the Rocky Mountain NP?), the bark beetles already got most of the trees. Oops, those dead trees are of course tinder, a real fire hazard. I would be very worried.
Eh, I am extremely well-insured. If the house burns down, so be it. I ain't gonna spend my time fretting about it. But we do need rain or snow.
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Old 10-09-2012, 02:23 PM   #31
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But we do need rain or snow.
Oh, yeah. Who doesn't?

The point is if it's not one thing, it's another.
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Old 10-09-2012, 03:18 PM   #32
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Amazingly, there are plenty of forests left, not just burned stumps, for me to ride my motorcycle through to explore.
A while back, someone just happened to notice that in paintings of people and scenery from over 100 years ago rarely showed thick, dense forestation, even in areas that are very heavily wooded.

Then it occurred that back then, if a forest fire started somewhere it was just allowed to burn itself out. As a result, the forestation was a lot thinner for the next lightning strike or spark and major fires were averted. Apparently its also excellent for the soil quality to burn everything out and start over.

So in short, by putting every little fire out, we make future fires worse and the soil quality in the areas worse. I understand the problem though, way too many pesky people building houses in areas where fire danger is high.

I keep a grand or two in the fire safe. Comes in handy when I need instant cash for a gift or for a school thing.

As I understand it, back in the meltdown we came within a few hours or days of enough of a collapse that people wouldn't be able to use atm's for at least a while. Good enough for me to mitigate that sort of potential problem by keeping enough cash to buy food and whatnot for a few weeks.

Not to mention that whole solar flare thing that comes around every hundred years or so. Last time it happened in the 1800's about the only technology we had was telegraph lines, and the flare blew the wires off the poles and caused extensive sparking around the machines. Oh, and we're overdue for the next one. Solar storm of 1859 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Plus we in California are overdue for a major bay area earthquake. I'm far enough away that the quake wouldn't affect me, but the resulting mayhem probably would.
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Old 10-09-2012, 04:25 PM   #33
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Speaking of Forest Fires

The Great Peshtigo Fire of 1871

The Peshtigo Fire occurred the same night as the Great Chicago Fire, we know which one got the press. 1.5 million acres over 1,000 deaths.
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Old 10-09-2012, 05:06 PM   #34
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That Peshtigo Forest Fire is truly impressive. Yes, I looked it up.
"... 1,875 square miles (4,860 kmē or 1.2 million acres) of forest had been consumed, an area approximately twice the size of Rhode Island. Some sources list 1.5 million acres (6,100 kmē) burned. Twelve communities were destroyed. An accurate death toll has never been determined since local population records were destroyed in the fire. Between 1,200 and 2,500 people are thought to have lost their lives."
The AZ Rodeo-Chediski Fire destroyed less than half the above area, was mostly contained in a national forest, and because it occurred in modern time, did not cause any casualty.

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I understand the problem though, way too many pesky people building houses in areas where fire danger is high.
Now that a fire has swept through, those pesky people who remained would be safe for a while, ya think?
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Old 10-09-2012, 05:24 PM   #35
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Now that a fire has swept through, those pesky people who remained would be safe for a while, ya think?
"We'll take it! Its pre-disastered!"

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Old 10-09-2012, 05:34 PM   #36
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The pre-disaster logic works for forest fires, which thin out the tinder. Not so much for plane crashes, hurricanes, tornadoes, and droughts, etc...

It may work for earthquakes too, which release some pressures in the earth.

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Plus we in California are overdue for a major bay area earthquake.
I wonder if the same logic works with the economy. The US got "sub-primed" pretty bad in the Great Recession. Will it not come for another generation or two?

Then, why is it that I recalled going through several smaller housing busts before that big one?
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Old 10-09-2012, 05:49 PM   #37
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FYA (For Your Amusement):

Our house was built after the Rodeo-Chediski fire. We did look at some existing homes prior to that. A couple were in an area touched by the fire, and miraculously survived. It was because most houses were actually at the edge of the national forest, not inside it. Hence, the surrounding trees were not as dense.

As you can guess, the prices of those houses were quite a bit lower than others. Hmm... In the end, I decided that not having to look at the surrounding burned stumps was worth paying a bit more money. Quite a bit more. Now, those surviving houses were truly "pre-disastered". However, the sellers were not able to raise the price with that qualification.
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Old 10-09-2012, 05:58 PM   #38
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I have been to Denver. Not too many trees until one gets pretty far from the city center. Still, that does not mean one cannot have brush fire.

You want real forest fire? Look up the Rodeo-Chediski fire that consumed real trees, more than 700 sq.mi. of them. In comparison, Rhode Island is only 1000 sq.mi. Amazingly, there are plenty of forests left, not just burned stumps, for me to ride my motorcycle through to explore.

Anyway, another problem is water, but ejman already extended me an invitation. I even learned that his well is only 70ft deep, not the depth of the wells here or in Texas.

Yep, that's another sign of problem. People have to drill deeper for water now than they used to do for oil. We're toastally doomed!
Speaking of forest fires, the Biscuit fire in 2002 burned almost 500,000 acres and was finally stopped near the Rogue River about 20 miles from my house. I do live in the forest but according to the Forest service I have enough "defensible" space around the house. I hope not to test that anytime soon (we haven't had a drop of rain for over 3 months...)
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Old 10-09-2012, 06:10 PM   #39
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That's the same year as the AZ fire I described. 2002 was a busy year for fires. The whole West was on fire!

Yes, up there, your whole state is a big forest. Not like here, where most of the forested area is a national forest, and private lots are mostly at the fringe of it.

If I had my house then, from its deck I would be able to survey the fire and have tales to tell. If they let me stay despite the evacuation, that is. And if I would dare stay.
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Old 10-09-2012, 06:12 PM   #40
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I wonder if the same logic works with the economy. The US got "sub-primed" pretty bad in the Great Recession. Will it not come for another generation or two?

Then, why is it that I recalled going through several smaller housing busts before that big one?
I bought a house in San Antonio for $56K in 1979, only to watch it (from a distance as I was working overseas) drop to about $40K in the early 80's. I had the house rented and being from an earlier generation I thought you just managed it the best you could until things improved (sold the house in 2005 and made a small capital gain). This new fangled walk away from it bit never even occurred to me.
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