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Old 10-04-2014, 08:30 PM   #21
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Not for the ticker, but for the underlying news, Real Money with Ali Velshi on Al Jazeera.
Before this, he was on CNN for 12 years. Best interviewer for facts and deep background.
My opinion only...
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Old 10-04-2014, 09:36 PM   #22
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I prefer Bloomberg when I get the itch to listen to TV financial news. Maybe two or three hours a week, which is less than in the past.

Most of the CNBC anchors I liked the most are gone: Erin Burnett left and Mark Haines died in 2011. Maria Bartiromo left in 2013.

Relatively speaking, Bloomberg is less frenetic than CNBC. I haven't tried Fox Financial.

I watch Bloomberg before or after w*rk. Tom Keene in the morning has grown on me. I didn't care for the radio simulcast format the first few times I saw it, though. For my taste, the Bloomberg West show is very watchable. They rarely spend much time on daily ups and downs, instead spending their time on technology stories and interviews. And Pimm Fox is a capable, no-hype interviewer. His nightly wrap-up is good enough to remind me I really miss Louis Ruykeyser from the old days.

Are there any night owls here that like to watch Bloomberg's European and Asian coverage? Very calm and to-the-point, even when reporting daily ups and downs. I enjoy it when I can, but lately it seems infomercials have taken over the time around midnight when I used to find it flipping channels as I tried to go to sleep.
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Old 10-05-2014, 03:06 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by audreyh1 View Post
Midpack -is there a link for your quote and graph?

I found it: CNBC Viewership Plunges To 21 Year Lows | Zero Hedge

One of the comments is "Fire Joe Kernan", LOL!
Whoops, I thought I included it. Thanks for providing the link.
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Old 10-05-2014, 06:56 AM   #24
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I used to watch it pretty avidly from the mid 90s to mid 2000s, then started watching less when it seemed to gradually become more political, and finally several years ago totally gave up it had become so editorial and rabid - spin, spin, spin.

Glad to see I'm not the only one!
Definitely not. I never watched it heavily but yeah, like almost all forms of cable "news" they couldn't help themselves and had to inject ideology and politics into far too much.
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Old 10-05-2014, 08:02 AM   #25
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Other successful cable "genre shows", such as MTV, Food Network, History Channel, all faced the same challenge but were able to keep their viewer ratings. They all evolved their programming into reality TV and shifted their original program to another, low cost channel to continue with the original program format.

Maybe that's what CNBC needs to do. They're trying, putting on programs related to financial crime and such, but they need to do a lot more. Move the financial reporting to a sister show with nothing flashy, straight reporting. Then put on some new reality shows that really have little to do with "financial news" but do focus on creating groups of people that need money for something and will compete for cash prizes by being irresponsible or doing dumb things. Kramer was a decent start but they didn't push that concept hard enough.
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Old 10-05-2014, 09:09 AM   #26
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Then put on some new reality shows that really have little to do with "financial news" but do focus on creating groups of people that need money for something...
Yeah, that's the ticket...

I've gotten started on my elevator pitch for a groundbreaking new show that can be simulcast on CNBC and Animal Planet...

I hear Bubbles the chimp is available. After being kicked out of Neverland, his subsequent gig as an Ameriprise advisor to other down-on-their-luck trust fund babies was very successful, but ultimately ended over a dispute over fees and commissions. He went on to become a senior equity analyst at a major wall street firm, specializing in agricultural commodity firms supplying the primate pet food industry. His track record was stellar. Consistent "strong buy" recommendations on market leaders Chiquita and Dole have paid off handsomely for investors.

Now, he makes his triumphant return to the spotlight in Bubble Busters, the daily show that combines the the excitement of the game show format with hard-hitting stock analysis from industry experts. Watch as a rotating lineup of Wall Street analysts and penny stock newsletter publishers compete for cash and prizes by matching wits with Bubbles. All participants make selections of stocks currently in the news and predict both short-term and long-term (next Friday's closing price) picks. Any stock whose price is listed in the daily edition of the WSJ is fair game for the contestants.

The show's title is meant to be ironic, because Bubbles rarely loses. One month into rehearsals, the results so far show that the "Bubbles Method" has a 50.174% success rate, enough to beat his contestants handily on nearly every pick.

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Old 10-05-2014, 10:15 AM   #27
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I flip back and forth between cnbc and Bloomberg in the am when I'm drinking my coffee. CNBC still has some good interviews latest was warren buffet this week. I'll record the shows and fast forward to the piece I wanna see. I do the same with cramer's mad money in the evening. About 10 minutes of that show is sometimes worth watching.
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Old 10-05-2014, 10:21 AM   #28
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Kelly Evans is worth watching IMHO.
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Old 10-05-2014, 11:05 AM   #29
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Having just retired and taken over our investments from my wife at her request, I look forward learning all I can about finances, retirement, economy and investments in general. So I turned on CNBC everyday to see what's going on in general. I turn it off if I feel it's not helping me. It's nice to see the action going on, although, I feel a lot of it is just over hyped or exaggerated blow by blow account of what is usually a slow cyclical process.

When I got my New laptop with Windows 8, all of the webcast are there to explore daily. It include CNBC, WSJ, Bloomberg, Reuters, AP, Marketwatch, Kiplinger, and yes, Cramer's Street.com So I can choose what I want to watch.

TV becomes a smaller part, but it's still nice to have.
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Old 10-05-2014, 11:52 AM   #30
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Like many others here, I quit watching the financial noise channel decades ago, and it appears I was following the herd out the door. Not surprising, but a quantitative appraisal of CNBCs value?
I haven't helped their ratings. Check the futures, opening and closing at most. Pretty much keep a certain percent in equities in Vanguard so day to day has
Little value.
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Old 10-05-2014, 12:23 PM   #31
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If you want financial news, what broadcast channels or programs do you watch that you prefer over CNBC?
I cut the cable cord a few months ago, but when I do have access to the business channels I much prefer Fox Business. I like Stuart Varney, Cavuto, Charles Payne and the rest of the team there.



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Old 10-05-2014, 03:33 PM   #32
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Other successful cable "genre shows", such as MTV, Food Network, History Channel, all faced the same challenge but were able to keep their viewer ratings. They all evolved their programming into reality TV and shifted their original program to another, low cost channel to continue with the original program format.

Maybe that's what CNBC needs to do. They're trying, putting on programs related to financial crime and such, but they need to do a lot more. Move the financial reporting to a sister show with nothing flashy, straight reporting. Then put on some new reality shows that really have little to do with "financial news" but do focus on creating groups of people that need money for something and will compete for cash prizes by being irresponsible or doing dumb things. Kramer was a decent start but they didn't push that concept hard enough.
They are actually doing much of this, with Shows like American Greed, the Profit, which I quite enjoy, and reruns of the Shark Tank and the Apprentice.

I find the Profit to be pretty interesting actually, folks might want to give it a shot.
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Old 10-05-2014, 04:56 PM   #33
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Can you understand Joe? He mumbles so much I have a hard time understanding what he is saying.
He does "old guy" muttering like my grandfather.

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Originally Posted by JoeWras View Post
Notice the ratings in the crash years. This is why most cable channels love misery. News or news-like channels prefer bad times, and even manufacture them if you ask me.

In some circumstances, it is disgraceful.

I pretty much have stopped watching all these channels. I especially mourn the loss of The Weather Channel of old.
The "love misery" reminds me of how the weather guys get when a storm is coming. I love when the Weather Channel shows their weather people trying to stand up in a hurricane.
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Old 10-05-2014, 07:12 PM   #34
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CNBC? What's that? No cable here.
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Old 10-05-2014, 10:28 PM   #35
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Just looking at the chart (since I don't watch CNBC) it looks more like the low point of a cycle than the end of the channel. I suspect that if we have some sort of market meltdown or some other crisis that effects the market the viewership will go right back up. Nobody needs to watch that crap when things are going good, but they want reassurance when things go south.
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Old 10-05-2014, 10:33 PM   #36
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Was just reading about this on deepcapture.com. Patrick byrne write an open letter to msnbc mocking them for challenging him but refusing to have him on. He's chronicled kramers illegal actions and they dont like it.


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Old 10-05-2014, 10:39 PM   #37
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Just looking at the chart (since I don't watch CNBC) it looks more like the low point of a cycle than the end of the channel. I suspect that if we have some sort of market meltdown or some other crisis that effects the market the viewership will go right back up. Nobody needs to watch that crap when things are going good, but they want reassurance when things go south.
Someone should make a mutual fund of all these stocks that take off when the market tanks. It could be a good hedge. What would be in it?
CNBC and other purveyors of financial whisperings
Gold--for the purest play, use just companies that sell gold retail to the public.
Brokers (?Do they make a lot of commissions when folks bail out?)
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Old 10-05-2014, 11:08 PM   #38
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The " Cramer on the Daily Show "video.

Jim Cramer Pt. 2 - The Daily Show - Video Clip | Comedy Central

A little dated ( several years old ) , it pretty much sum's up why CNBC ratings has been on a death spiral.
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Old 10-06-2014, 08:48 AM   #39
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CNBC was at its best on 9/11. I remember Mark Haines breaking in and saying that some kind of aircraft had flown into the World Trade Center as I was getting ready for work. Mark and the "boys" were speculating on what kind of aircraft would make that size hole in the side of the building when the feed from the live camera on the ground went up. They were speculating on some kind of air traffic control failure when the second plane came into view on a camera on a nearby building and flew into the second tower.

At that point I made the decision to sit tight until I knew what was happening. CNBC had the best coverage that day, especially the first few hours, when no one knew what was going on.

Over the years, programming quality went down, the "boys" got too big for their britches, and I stopped watching CNBC. I was saddened when Mark Haines died, because he did a good job overall as the anchor of the morning program and was the best substitute for Walter Cronkite out there on 9/11.
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Old 10-06-2014, 11:35 AM   #40
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They are actually doing much of this, with Shows like American Greed, the Profit, which I quite enjoy, and reruns of the Shark Tank and the Apprentice.

I find the Profit to be pretty interesting actually, folks might want to give it a shot.
I really like The Profit, too.

Does anyone remember when TLC channel was The Learning Channel? There was actual science and education going on there. Now it's turned into all reality shows.

Somewhat off topic, but I nominate "Naked and Afraid" as the worst show on tv. It's been on Discovery Channel since last year. I feel sorry for Discovery for having to stoop that low.
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