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Old 04-25-2008, 05:55 PM   #61
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I too am very interested in the PT lifestyle after my kids are grown and gone.

Three things hold me back:

1. My grandfather's desk, which was given to my father which was given to me. Everything else I own is just stuff and I would and could gladly sell it all and the house that it's stored in.

2. Being an introvert. It seems like the successful PT's are all extroverts.

3. Exiting the lifestyle. In my case I wonder if I would get priced out of the market if I sold my house, PT'ed for say 10 years, then wanted to return to a house in the US.

Comments?

2Cor521
respectfully ... B.S.
1) family or friend can take your GF desk in OR store it if it really means that much to you
... how big can it be?
2) we are 'private' people, DW is introvert, I can be called an extrovert, but we really stay to ourselves if given the choice
3) rent your place, or sell your place and put it into a property related investment if you are really afraid of missing out on all the gains that we have seen in the past few years (HUGE TONGUE IN CHEEK).

It seems you are looking for excuses because dumping ones existing life and traveling around to the 'unknown' is ... well unknown and scary,

It's not for everyone ... but it is a blast if you are into it.
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Old 04-25-2008, 05:56 PM   #62
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@LG4NB,

Yeah, I thought about storage for the desk...around here that would run me maybe $20-$40 per month, or I could just put it in a friend's garage for maybe $10 a month. That would work.

There may be a few other items that I just couldn't bear to part with, but it wouldn't be that much. After my divorce I became very light on possessions -- On January 15, 2006 I was literally living in a hotel with the clothes on my back plus a duffel bag of clothes. I've moved up from that point to a bed, a TV, and a couch, plus the usual house accoutrements like a lawmower and kitchen utensils, but I'm pretty spartan already. I think there is a certain appeal to me in the PT lifestyle of how "lightly" one can go. I've been fascinated to read stories about "100 things" and getting one's possessions down that far. I don't know if I'll do that but quite frankly stuff just wears me down for the most part.

I think your point about getting out drawing me out is true. In retrospect I am much more extroverted when I travel.

As far as houses go, I'm on my fourth one and have made money on each one. I think my perspective is skewed by house #3, which we bought about 5 years ago and sold in the divorce process. The price on that house went up by about 40%, and since we went in with only 10% down, I now find myself being in the situation of not being able to afford to buy that house again. Of course, there are many unique factors that apply -- the divorce, the timing of the house appreciation, the particular buyers that we sold to, etc. The other three houses have done well, perhaps slightly ahead of inflation. I guess I would just need to figure out the economics of that.

Oh, and you are right, I'd just stick the net house proceeds in the stash if I were to actually do this. So if the market did better I'd be ahead (without accounting for the leverage from a mortgage).

2Cor521
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Old 04-25-2008, 06:02 PM   #63
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Originally Posted by megacorp-firee View Post
respectfully ... B.S.
1) family or friend can take your GF desk in OR store it if it really means that much to you
... how big can it be?
2) we are 'private' people, DW is introvert, I can be called an extrovert, but we really stay to ourselves if given the choice
3) rent your place, or sell your place and put it into a property related investment if you are really afraid of missing out on all the gains that we have seen in the past few years (HUGE TONGUE IN CHEEK).

It seems you are looking for excuses because dumping ones existing life and traveling around to the 'unknown' is ... well unknown and scary,

It's not for everyone ... but it is a blast if you are into it.
Respectfully: you either misinterpeted what I wrote, I didn't write it clearly (probably true), or you're projecting, or something else.

I probably should have said that those three items were things I'd have to figure out solutions to before I did the PT thing. My bad.

As to (1), yes it has enough sentimental value to me to hold on to and store. It's the only tangible item of significance that I will have handed down to me from my father.

As to (3), I have made a profit on the first three houses I bought, and the fourth house in which I currently live was appraised in early February for more than what I paid for it in December 06. But I do get your point.

I'm neither afraid of nor do I lack knowledge of the world. I've traveled to about 15 different countries and about 35 different states and am quite comfortable and interested in traveling, otherwise I wouldn't have posted in this thread at all.

2Cor521
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Old 04-25-2008, 06:13 PM   #64
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Respectfully: you either misinterpeted what I wrote, I didn't write it clearly (probably true), or you're projecting, or something else.

I probably should have said that those three items were things I'd have to figure out solutions to before I did the PT thing. My bad.

As to (1), yes it has enough sentimental value to me to hold on to and store. It's the only tangible item of significance that I will have handed down to me from my father.

As to (3), I have made a profit on the first three houses I bought, and the fourth house in which I currently live was appraised in early February for more than what I paid for it in December 06. But I do get your point.

I'm neither afraid of nor do I lack knowledge of the world. I've traveled to about 15 different countries and about 35 different states and am quite comfortable and interested in traveling, otherwise I wouldn't have posted in this thread at all.

2Cor521
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My bad ... your '... Three things hold me back ...' quote made me think that you are not considering it. Misinterpretation.
store the desk, put on a smile and sell the house ... see you in some airport with a funny name ...
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Old 04-25-2008, 06:31 PM   #65
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2ndcor,

In re: #3, you could sell the house and put the proceeds into an REIT fund if you just wanted to stay even with US real estate (don't spend the dividends, though).

I have read other people experiencing being priced out of their home country market upon repatriating. As I recall, an Englander on LonelyPlanet Thorn Tree started a thread on the subject.

A serious concern, not often discussed here.
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Old 04-25-2008, 06:51 PM   #66
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As to (3), I have made a profit on the first three houses I bought, and the fourth house in which I currently live was appraised in early February for more than what I paid for it in December 06. But I do get your point.
If you sell a place in the North End and while you're gone MU shuts down their facilities, you just may be able to get back in cheaper than you started... On the other hand, not likely, and most NE properties will retain their value regardless.

It is all a dice roll/coin toss... If you want to PT then you need to make risk your friend.
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Old 04-25-2008, 09:42 PM   #67
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Originally Posted by SecondCor521 View Post
@LG4NB,

Yeah, I thought about storage for the desk...around here that would run me maybe $20-$40 per month, or I could just put it in a friend's garage for maybe $10 a month. That would work.

There may be a few other items that I just couldn't bear to part with, but it wouldn't be that much. After my divorce I became very light on possessions -- On January 15, 2006 I was literally living in a hotel with the clothes on my back plus a duffel bag of clothes. I've moved up from that point to a bed, a TV, and a couch, plus the usual house accoutrements like a lawmower and kitchen utensils, but I'm pretty spartan already. I think there is a certain appeal to me in the PT lifestyle of how "lightly" one can go. I've been fascinated to read stories about "100 things" and getting one's possessions down that far. I don't know if I'll do that but quite frankly stuff just wears me down for the most part.

I think your point about getting out drawing me out is true. In retrospect I am much more extroverted when I travel.

As far as houses go, I'm on my fourth one and have made money on each one. I think my perspective is skewed by house #3, which we bought about 5 years ago and sold in the divorce process. The price on that house went up by about 40%, and since we went in with only 10% down, I now find myself being in the situation of not being able to afford to buy that house again. Of course, there are many unique factors that apply -- the divorce, the timing of the house appreciation, the particular buyers that we sold to, etc. The other three houses have done well, perhaps slightly ahead of inflation. I guess I would just need to figure out the economics of that.

Oh, and you are right, I'd just stick the net house proceeds in the stash if I were to actually do this. So if the market did better I'd be ahead (without accounting for the leverage from a mortgage).

2Cor521
2Cor, I feel for ya, but getting rid of stuff can be quite a liberating experience. I thought I was a light shopper until I moved out of my townhouse to go to school. I got rid of the sofa, entertainment system, bedroom set, kitchen chairs, punching bag, 1 car, and I still ended up with a 17' Uhual full to the gills. After I got to my school apartment, I proceeded to dump all of my old electrical engineering books plus other assorted junk. On my move out of the apartment, I dumped the dining room table, the heavy drapes, the old coffee table, and a non-functional lamp, and I gave away a bookcase. Three purges, and now I still have a small apartment and a storage closet. I think I'll go for inflatable furniture from now on.
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Old 04-26-2008, 01:30 AM   #68
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2ndcor,

In re: #3, you could sell the house and put the proceeds into an REIT fund if you just wanted to stay even with US real estate (don't spend the dividends, though).

I have read other people experiencing being priced out of their home country market upon repatriating. As I recall, an Englander on LonelyPlanet Thorn Tree started a thread on the subject.

A serious concern, not often discussed here.
When we moved to the US in '87 this was a concern to us so we rented out our house. In '92 when we decided to make the US our permanent home we sold the house in England and bought here.
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Old 04-26-2008, 09:06 PM   #69
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My bad ... your '... Three things hold me back ...' quote made me think that you are not considering it. Misinterpretation.
store the desk, put on a smile and sell the house ... see you in some airport with a funny name ...
Sorry, I was having a bad day. I had reread what I wrote and it wasn't clear.

I'm here until the kids get bigger, so it'll be a few years still...

2Cor521
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Old 04-26-2008, 09:14 PM   #70
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If you sell a place in the North End and while you're gone MU shuts down their facilities, you just may be able to get back in cheaper than you started... On the other hand, not likely, and most NE properties will retain their value regardless.

It is all a dice roll/coin toss... If you want to PT then you need to make risk your friend.
I don't think MU is going to be building on to their facilities here.

House #1 was in the North End. I've always lived more on the HP side of the ville.

2Cor521
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Health Insurance and other thoughts
Old 04-27-2008, 12:57 AM   #71
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Health Insurance and other thoughts

I've been overseas since 1970 and loved it all, but my insurance was always paid for by the international school that I worked at. The insurance I now have is International Health Insurance (IHI). I like it because on my trips to the States, I'm covered. All the rest of the insurance policies do not have that. I have a US $1,600 deductible and it costs $3,000/year. It's pretty costly, but it covers me no matter where I am, including the states.

Now is maybe the time of my life where I am at a critical crossroad. I'M RETIRING!!! I never really considered myself the traditional worker since my teaching has been in some pretty exotic countries (Liberia, Venezuela, Vietnam, Korea, Singapore, Iran, Saudi Arabia, and currently Jordan). I'm sort of not telling people that I'm retiring, but instead saying "I'm taking some time off". However, in my heart, I'm actually going to do it, or at least semi-retire.

Over Spring Break I took almost all my belongings to Montreal. I have a couple of Chinese friends (brother and sister) that are the closest thing to a family I have. We have a home outside Montreal. I'm American, so of course I will not spend all of my time there. This is where I am struggling. I know Akaisha and Billy have a good arrangement in Arizona, where they can travel to and live for part of the year. I need to find a place for where I will be when I'm not shivering in those cold Canadian winters.

I was thinking of San Antonio, but as I go on-line and look at places like Costa Rica and the relatively easy retirement visas they offer, I can see myself traveling there later this year (when the Cold Canadian winter begins) and maybe working on a retirement visa and looking at properties. Condo prices have risen a lot in Costa Rica, but there are still lots of listings for under $130,000 with financing. The propery taxes are no more than $150/year in many of the condos. That certainly beats San Antonio where the property taxes are often more than $400/month for condos.

I still have Singapore as a possibilty. After living there for almost 20 years, I am a Permanent Resident (green card holder), and I could always live there for part of the year.

Great that a lot of you are considering the "perpetual traveling lifestyle", but having a home base is certainly important when you do this, and that is what I will be working on.

Regards,
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Old 04-27-2008, 02:34 PM   #72
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This is a really interesting thread, I'm so glad it was resurrected.

I retired in March, 2007. I'm 49, never married, no kids, and have a bit of an adventurous streak. My favorite travel destinations thus far would have to be Cuba and pretty much anywhere in Southeast Asia. I usually travel alone.

While I am single, I nevertheless have some strong roots here in Tucson. I'm very close with my mom. She's 77, and has been undergoing chemotherapy for three years for her stage 4 cancer. She loves to travel, and now can do it only through my eyes. I call her frequently from hotel rooms when overseas. It's quite simple and relatively cheap using AT&T phone cards and the in-country access codes. I'm sure there are even cheaper ways, but I can certainly afford the modest cost of $5.00 chats with Mom, and it's really nice to call from the comfort and quiet of my room.

I digress...In light of my mom's health, I'm committed to remaining in Tucson during her lifetime, and I now limit my overseas trips to a maximum length of about 3 weeks. That will change after her death. Then I will probably move towards open-ended travel, maybe starting with 2 or 3 months overseas, and seeing how that feels. One issue that occasionally comes up for me when overseas is social isolation, leading to a sense of alienation. I'm a very social person. I find it easy to get along with almost all people. And I am typically very comfortable when surrounded by people who don't speak my language. For example, yesterday, here in Tucson, I spent about 6 hours with refugees with whom I volunteer, who speak little or no English. A motley bunch, including Karen tribal people from Burma, Chinese, Somalis, Sudanese, and Iranians. But traveling in the type of places I like to go to (Pakistan may be next on my agenda) is a different animal. It's not reasonable to expect myself to become conversationally capable in Pushtun before visiting. If that was the requirement, I'd never go anywhere. In sum, the issue of language barriers is, for me, a cost of perpetual or frequent overseas travel, especially since my preference is always to hang out with the locals, and keeping contact with other westerners to a minimum.

Back to the focus of this thread, I usually find myself living like a king, at pauper's prices, in the kind of places I prefer to go. I seem to be drawn to destinations as different as possible from my life in America. I'm especially keen on Communist nations, sort of a political endangered species. North Korea, anyone? They sure know how to put on a show...

My thanks to MJ, Lance, Billy and Akaisha, Rob, lazygood4nothin and many others for their thoughtful, interesting and informative posts regarding overseas perspectives and experiences.

Tom
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Old 04-27-2008, 02:57 PM   #73
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But traveling in the type of places I like to go to (Pakistan may be next on my agenda) is a different animal. It's not reasonable to expect myself to become conversationally capable in Pushtun before visiting. If that was the requirement, I'd never go anywhere.
I don't know about Pakistan but expect it is very similar to India where English is almost universally spoken. In India the children learn English at a very young age in school. I went to Mumbai (Bombay) in India last year for a couple of weeks and found the people extremely welcoming, and english was universally spoken. As you point out, the prices are incredibly cheap compared to here. I know quite a few folks who have had wonderful vacations in various places in India.
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Old 04-27-2008, 03:44 PM   #74
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I still have Singapore as a possibilty. After living there for almost 20 years, I am a Permanent Resident (green card holder), and I could always live there for part of the year.
? Rob, I thought that cost of living in Singapore was relatively high. Doesn't that defeat the purpose of finding a 'cheap' home base?
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Cost of living in Singapore
Old 04-27-2008, 11:40 PM   #75
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Cost of living in Singapore

The cost of living in Singapore is deceptive. About the only thing that will affect your budget is the housing. However, there are apartments, one or 2 bedroom not to difficult to find, that will run you about US$1,000 to US$1500 in public housing, but it's very safe. In Singapore, where you save is their mass transit that is second to none and goes to all parts of Singapore. You just don't need a car. Also, the food in "hawker centers" is so good and yet so inexpensive (a healthy serving of chicken rice for about US$2. Finally the medical care is superb. In my 20 years there, if I had a case of the flu, I could visit one of the many clinics all over the island, get consultation, antibiotics, and a brief check-up all for under US$20. Not bad.

The people in Singapore complain a lot about the high stress of life, as we do in all countries. There is no welfare system except the fact that extended families really do look out for the welfare of family members.

If you have never lived in Singapore, it's frankly the last place you should ever consider retiring, since they don't offer a retirement visa. However, I have a long history in Singapore, am a "green card" holder (Permanent Resident), and so I can live there when I want. I'm also familiar with their housing market, and can find something reasonable. I really plan on visiting a lot, and maybe even staying there some more. However, now I like the idea of being with close Chinese friends in Montreal after I retire from teaching in 6 weeks at 61. So happy!

One additional comment- if I ever were to retire to Singapore, the options to keep myself busy range from swimming, to yoga, to Tai Chi, to teaching ESL for maybe an hour or 2 a day (to pay the rent). Also, you know- I love living in a foreign culture, but I hate traveling to get there. When I say Singapore would be my homebase, I'd probably just not leave it too much except to travel up to Malaysia or a few of the Indonesian islands just off the coast of Singapore.

Regards,
Rob
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