Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-01-2009, 06:09 AM   #21
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
BunsGettingFirm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 1,502
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lusitan View Post
Well, this is one of the reasons why I have pondered the OP's question myself. Youth goes, and most of it goes by whilst sitting behind a desk at some j*b. I don't want to stick around at the office one minute longer than necessary!
I agree, but if all I had to do is sit behind a desk, I'd do that and try to live the other 16 hours a day as interestingly as possible. However, most professional jobs involve dealing with people's enormous egos and miniscule accomplishments. Yesterday an office mate wasted an hour and half of my time giving me crap for "not keeping him informed" because his self style "IT steering committee" needs to be informed of all the IT projects going on within various programs. When I asked him how often his "IT steering committee" meets, he said, oh, from time to time when I feel like it. In other words, if you actually depended on this so-called IT steering committee to get any real projects accomplished, you're sh1t out of luck. He's not adding any value, but needs to be in the loop to repeat everything that you have done to the IT people again, on an irregular and unreliable basis, just so that he looks important. In short, another time wasting hot air bag I have to deal with. To top it off, the idiot support guy, sensing that he's being cut out of "important decisions", launched into a 20 minute tirade about how spending $40k on implementing a software package is a "not a wise financial decision." OK, I can pay you, Mr. High School Graduate, $40k. Please write the software in 3 months. Thank god I'm well on my way to FI, and thank goodness for the enlightenment thanks to Dilbert that people really are idiots that I don't take this kind of stupidity seriously.

A lot of the already ERs are far removed from the day-to-day grind, idiocy, inefficiency, ego trips, back stabbing, and moronic behavior of a typical office to think that there is this nirvana of being able to just show up to work, get paid, and go home to live an interesting life. There is no such thing.
__________________

__________________
BunsGettingFirm is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 08-01-2009, 06:44 AM   #22
Recycles dryer sheets
Medit8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 119
Pulled the plug at 46, some 3 months ago. I took a year off 3 years ago, so I knew this is what I wanted to do. Love it and don't ever want to look back. The time I get to spend with my 2 young girls now is irreplacable.
__________________

__________________
Ty Webb to Carl Spackler: "Got a pond...got a pool and a pond. Pond would be good for you."
Medit8 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2009, 08:01 AM   #23
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Midpack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 11,963
Good to see some replies from folks who have been retired for a long time. Not to slight those who have only been retired a few years, but it would seem you'll only know for sure if it was a good decision financially at the end of the plan. Retirement is about much more than $ and there are tradeoffs to making the $ work, but that part has to work to make the rest possible. Also make a big difference if you're FIRE or SIRE or where in that continuum. I am 55, not retired, and still can't figure out if I will work another year or 10...but it is helpful to read all the perspectives here.
__________________
No one agrees with other people's opinions; they merely agree with their own opinions -- expressed by somebody else. Sydney Tremayne
Retired Jun 2011 at age 57

Target AA: 60% equity funds / 35% bond funds / 5% cash
Target WR: Approx 2.5% Approx 20% SI (secure income, SS only)
Midpack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2009, 08:07 AM   #24
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso) Give me a forum ...
REWahoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Texas Hill Country
Posts: 42,072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Midpack View Post
Good to see some replies from folks who have been retired for a long time. Not to slight those who have only been retired a few years, but it would seem you'll only know for sure if it was a good decision financially at the end of the plan.
Isn't that true regardless of how long any of us have been retired?
__________________
Numbers is hard

When I hit 70, it hit back

Retired in 2005 at age 58, no pension
REWahoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2009, 08:09 AM   #25
Recycles dryer sheets
Medit8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Midpack View Post
Good to see some replies from folks who have been retired for a long time. Not to slight those who have only been retired a few years, but it would seem you'll only know for sure if it was a good decision financially at the end of the plan. Retirement is about much more than $ and there are tradeoffs to making the $ work, but that part has to work to make the rest possible. Also make a big difference if you're FIRE or SIRE or where in that continuum. I am 55, not retired, and still can't figure out if I will work another year or 10...but it is helpful to read all the perspectives here.
Ok, I'll bite. Financially, I am sure I won't have a problem. For me, it was a whole host of other considerations that came into play. I have conquered most of those other "demons" and I couldn't be happier about my choice. I could have done this 3 years ago, but am happy with the way things are turning out. And boy is my golf handicap getting better. Just shot my first 80 on Friday. Looking forward to getting under than shortly...
__________________
Ty Webb to Carl Spackler: "Got a pond...got a pool and a pond. Pond would be good for you."
Medit8 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2009, 08:29 AM   #26
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Moemg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Sarasota,fl.
Posts: 10,030
Quote:
Originally Posted by Midpack View Post
Good to see some replies from folks who have been retired for a long time. Not to slight those who have only been retired a few years, but it would seem you'll only know for sure if it was a good decision financially at the end of the plan. Retirement is about much more than $ and there are tradeoffs to making the $ work, but that part has to work to make the rest possible. Also make a big difference if you're FIRE or SIRE or where in that continuum. I am 55, not retired, and still can't figure out if I will work another year or 10...but it is helpful to read all the perspectives


.



Normally I would agree with you but several of us retired just as the economic melt down occurred .We watched our portfolios melt away . If that did not make us run for jobs or leave the country I think our plans were pretty good .
__________________
Moemg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2009, 08:38 AM   #27
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Midpack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 11,963
Quote:
Originally Posted by REWahoo View Post
Isn't that true regardless of how long any of us have been retired?
No interest in a dispute, but I guess I don't see how anyone will really know if their $ plan worked until the plan actually ends. Anytime before that, it's a calculated probability, but I don't have the experience many here have.
__________________
No one agrees with other people's opinions; they merely agree with their own opinions -- expressed by somebody else. Sydney Tremayne
Retired Jun 2011 at age 57

Target AA: 60% equity funds / 35% bond funds / 5% cash
Target WR: Approx 2.5% Approx 20% SI (secure income, SS only)
Midpack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2009, 08:40 AM   #28
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Midpack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 11,963
Quote:
Originally Posted by Medit8 View Post
Ok, I'll bite. Financially, I am sure I won't have a problem. For me, it was a whole host of other considerations that came into play. I have conquered most of those other "demons" and I couldn't be happier about my choice. I could have done this 3 years ago, but am happy with the way things are turning out. And boy is my golf handicap getting better. Just shot my first 80 on Friday. Looking forward to getting under than shortly...
OP's question was very open ended. In your case it is all about the important non-financial aspects, congratulations (really).
__________________
No one agrees with other people's opinions; they merely agree with their own opinions -- expressed by somebody else. Sydney Tremayne
Retired Jun 2011 at age 57

Target AA: 60% equity funds / 35% bond funds / 5% cash
Target WR: Approx 2.5% Approx 20% SI (secure income, SS only)
Midpack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2009, 08:48 AM   #29
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
BunsGettingFirm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 1,502
Quote:
Originally Posted by Midpack View Post
No interest in a dispute, but I guess I don't see how anyone will really know if their $ plan worked until the plan actually ends. Anytime before that, it's a calculated probability, but I don't have the experience many here have.
Yes, but everyone is preparing for the left tail. What about the right tail? A lot of people drop dead before they hit 60 as well.
__________________

__________________
BunsGettingFirm is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Do you regret saving too much? JustCurious FIRE and Money 91 06-29-2012 12:01 AM
anyone ever REGRET doing a 72T? retiringat50 FIRE and Money 2 01-14-2008 06:00 PM
Regret of quiting Spanky Young Dreamers 21 01-24-2007 02:02 PM
Probably regret this, but... brewer12345 FIRE and Money 29 02-15-2006 09:59 AM
Any regret for getting into management or vice versa Spanky Life after FIRE 35 01-26-2006 10:08 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:13 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.