Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-19-2016, 02:36 AM   #21
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 5,264
Quote:
Originally Posted by InTheSticks View Post
I am posting this for a co-worker. She's 58 and planning for retirement. She's divorced with one child, a senior in high school. She was married for more then 10 years and she has been divorced for several years. He is two years older then she is.

We know she is entitled to file on her ex-husbands social security. But, have not been able to find where to confirm this and determine her options. The question is, would she be able to file on his account at 62? Then, at FRA or later, switch over to her account without impacting amounts?

Her ex made significantly less then she did.
yes , divorced folks can still take a spouses benefit and later switch to their own . for married folks they lost that option .
__________________

__________________
mathjak107 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 09-19-2016, 01:28 PM   #22
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 2,168
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
yes , divorced folks can still take a spouses benefit and later switch to their own . for married folks they lost that option .

As long as you were married longer than 10 years, I think.


Sent from my iPhone using Early Retirement Forum
__________________

__________________
tmm99 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2016, 01:49 PM   #23
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Sunset's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Chicago
Posts: 4,046
Might be a way to bump up the benefits, I'll have to talk to the DW about it
__________________
Sunset is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2016, 03:40 PM   #24
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Florence, AL/Helen, GA
Posts: 1,943
I had friends that were divorced in their mid 50's, and the wife had it written in her divorce settlement that she would be getting 1/2 of his social security payment.

I always wonder if that 20 years younger redhead he quickly married realized that she wouldn't be receiving his social security if they remained married 10 years or longer.

Yes, such subjects are often addressed in divorce settlements.
__________________
Bamaman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2016, 04:08 PM   #25
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
ivinsfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,978
[QUOTE=Bamaman;1782326]I had friends that were divorced in their mid 50's, and the wife had it written in her divorce settlement that she would be getting 1/2 of his social security payment.

I always wonder if that 20 years younger redhead he quickly married realized that she wouldn't be receiving his social security if they remained married 10 years or longer.

Yes, such subjects are often addressed in divorce settlements.[/QUOTE

Is this urban legend, because I don't think SS accepts divorces settlements and I'm pretty sure the second wife would NOT have to give up a spousal benefit.
__________________
ivinsfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2016, 04:29 PM   #26
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 2,742
Quote:
Originally Posted by ivinsfan View Post

Is this urban legend, because I don't think SS accepts divorces settlements and I'm pretty sure the second wife would NOT have to give up a spousal benefit.
I agree. While a court might enforce something that says, "When the Ex gets SS, he'll send me a check for half that every month", it would be very bad public policy for SS to actually pay beneficiaries something different from what the law allows based on wording in a divorce decree. Second wife would still get spousal benefits if/when she qualifies.
__________________
athena53 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2016, 04:29 PM   #27
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Sunset's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Chicago
Posts: 4,046
I'll be SS allows a Person to marry someone for 10.5 yrs, divorce, then repeat with another person for 10.5 yrs , divorce repeat with another person 10.5 yrs and again.

So that in the end that one Person's SS benefits 4 spouses and the original Person.

It's like free money
__________________
Sunset is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2016, 05:34 PM   #28
Recycles dryer sheets
nubill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by pb4uski View Post
It has been updated for the change in law.
Thanks pb4uski. I ran my situation (not planning on being divorced). Here was the result. Changed names in the printout. It also gave a comparison for this scenario and both me and DW collecting at FRA. Which this was greater.

DW will file for her own benefit to start on 5/1/2019, the month after she turns 62 and receive 72.5% of her full retirement age benefit.
nubill will file and "restrict his application" to his spousal benefit to start on 8/1/2019 when he is full retirement age and receive 43.4% of Diane's full retirement age benefit.
nubill will file for his own benefit to start on 8/1/2023, the month after he turns 70 and receive 108.78% of his full retirement age benefit.
After she is widowed DW will receive her survivor's benefit which will be 132% of nubill's full retirement age benefit.
__________________
nubill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2016, 05:44 PM   #29
Recycles dryer sheets
nubill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunset View Post
I'll be SS allows a Person to marry someone for 10.5 yrs, divorce, then repeat with another person for 10.5 yrs , divorce repeat with another person 10.5 yrs and again.

So that in the end that one Person's SS benefits 4 spouses and the original Person.

It's like free money
I think they call it the Elizabeth Taylor rule. Or you could do it in parallel like this lady.
__________________
nubill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2016, 01:19 AM   #30
Dryer sheet aficionado
 
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 49
Just a note that the social security rules changed to prevent filing for benefits at two separate times. You used to be able to file on your spouse's record, suspend benefits, and later file on your own. But that changed between the start of this thread and now:
https://www.ssa.gov/planners/retire/suspend.html

You can no longer "file and suspend" to get partial benefits at an earlier date.
__________________
OverThinkMuch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2016, 03:53 AM   #31
Recycles dryer sheets
nubill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by OverThinkMuch View Post
https://www.ssa.gov/planners/retire/suspend.html

You can no longer "file and suspend" to get partial benefits at an earlier date.
Maybe others on this forum can clarify. My understanding is that anyone born in 1953 or earlier is grandfathered. Pb4uski's post #12 states that the calculator has been updated for the change in the law. I don't understand the 1953 cut off date. Maybe it was a payback because males born in that year were subject to the last selective service draft lottery back in 1972. Anyway, I will probably buy the latest book from Mike Piper a few months before my FRA. I suspect more changes between now and then. From reading posts on Bogleheads, Kotlicoff's book has errors. Hopefully they have been fixed.
__________________
nubill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2016, 04:55 AM   #32
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: MSP
Posts: 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by nubill View Post
From reading posts on Bogleheads, Kotlicoff's book has errors. Hopefully they have been fixed.

They have. I see at my local Barnes & Noble that the copies now on display are the recently revised versions.
__________________
UpAnchor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2016, 06:45 AM   #33
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 2,742
Quote:
Originally Posted by nubill View Post
I don't understand the 1953 cut off date. Maybe it was a payback because males born in that year were subject to the last selective service draft lottery back in 1972.
My guess is that they wanted to soften the impact so that people who were planning to retire in the next year or two and take advantage of File and Suspend or Restricted Benefits would not have significant disruptions.

It was interesting to watch the progression of clickbait headlines over this. First there was nothing. Then there was Kotlikoff's book. Then there was "You could collect $50K more from Social Security by making this move!" Then there was "Couples could lose $50K due to changes in Social Security Laws", etc. Re-writes of news someone else originated are what passes for journalism now.
__________________
athena53 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2016, 06:46 AM   #34
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Amethyst's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 5,511
That's correct. It only works for brunettes.

[QUOTE=ivinsfan;1782338]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bamaman View Post

I always wonder if that 20 years younger redhead he quickly married realized that she wouldn't be receiving his social security if they remained married 10 years or longer.

.[/QUOTE

Is this urban legend, because I don't think SS accepts divorces settlements and I'm pretty sure the second wife would NOT have to give up a spousal benefit.
__________________

__________________
If you understood everything I say, you'd be me ~ Miles Davis
'There is only one success to be able to spend your life in your own way. Christopher Morley.
Amethyst is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Social Security and Medicare Taxes and Benefits over a Lifetime SumDay FIRE and Money 1 11-18-2013 05:27 PM
Divorce and Credit scores clifp FIRE and Money 24 11-13-2007 09:13 PM
Question about divorce and mortgage. newguy88 FIRE and Money 10 06-19-2007 08:43 AM
Divorce, Net Worth and Early Retirement GMueller FIRE and Money 80 10-17-2006 10:31 AM
Divorce and Taxes SecondCor521 FIRE and Money 17 10-10-2006 04:07 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:09 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.