Join Early Retirement Today
Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 07-02-2010, 06:31 AM   #41
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso) Give me a forum ...
REWahoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Texas Hill Country
Posts: 42,074
Quote:
Originally Posted by donheff View Post
We make all these posts about the joys of ER from our desks at mega-corp.
Desk? You have a desk? Sheesh.

I'm posting from a 4 x 4 cubicle, sitting on an overturned wastebasket...
__________________

__________________
Numbers is hard

When I hit 70, it hit back

Retired in 2005 at age 58, no pension
REWahoo is offline  
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 07-02-2010, 06:42 AM   #42
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Dawg52's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Central MS/Orange Beach, AL
Posts: 7,432
Quote:
Originally Posted by REWahoo View Post
Desk? You have a desk? Sheesh.

I'm posting from a 4 x 4 cubicle, sitting on an overturned wastebasket...
Picture this. I once worked in an office just a little bigger than your cubicle, using one of those old 1940 style metal desk. The drawers on the darn thing would barely move. The floor above me was part of our warehouse where the idiot manager stored cleaners and chemicals we sold. Quite often I would come in with Johnson Floor Wax dripping from the ceiling, covering my entire desk. I guess that is why we had metal desk, so we could easily clean up the mess.
__________________

__________________
Retired 3/31/2007@52
Full time wuss.......
Dawg52 is offline  
Old 07-02-2010, 06:49 AM   #43
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: France
Posts: 1,195
A guy I used to play chess with retired at 48. He had joined France Telecom (or their predecessor, the state post/telecomms monopoly) at 18. Normally you needed 35 years service for a full pension, but at some point the government wanted people to breed more and so gave you 5 more years pension credit ("hey, someone else can pay, 20 years from now") if you have 3 kids, which he duly did. (We know at least two other people whose avowed principal reason for a third kid was this generous incentive.)

This guy had always had a slightly unusual living arrangement. He had moved to a village and bought the left half of a double house. He then got together (in the Biblical sense) with the lady in the right half. They had those 3 kids together, but never married and always kept their own houses. Just as well, because within 18 months of him retiring, they had split up, because she couldn't stand him being around all the time, despite the fact that she could go back to her own house! (Of course, there's probably more to it than that, but it's a great story).

He's now 53. My wife bumped into him the other day and he has a new SO and is enjoying life. He still has the same length of hair he did in 1975. He's put on a little weight, but he's stopped smoking cigarettes. (He only stopped smoking reefer about 10 years before that. No wonder we had unreliable phone service in our part of the world. )
__________________
Age 56, retired July 1, 2012; DW is 60 and working for 2 more years. Current portfolio is 2000K split 50 stocks/20 bonds/30 cash. Renting house, no debts.
BigNick is offline  
Old 07-02-2010, 07:08 AM   #44
Dryer sheet aficionado
angelbaby's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by accountingsucks View Post
If these early retirees exist, where are they? I do not want examples from internet blogs. Do you actually know a real person who has retired in the 40's or early 50's successfully?

My mother, a California state employee, is getting ready to retire in about four more years. She's in her mid-40's. She contributed heavily to a defined benefit pension that matches contributions and pays out according to number of years worked for the state. She also contributed to a 457 plan and has several small investments in oil stocks in taxable accounts. In addition to her home, she owns two rental propeties, one townhouse and one condo.

She's not that financial literate and is just a high school graduate. Believe me, if she can do it, anyone can. It just takes dedication, goal-setting and knowing what you want out of life.
__________________
"There's nothing sadder in this world than to awake Christmas morning and not be a child. I Lost Everything in the Post-Natal Depression." - Erma Bombeck

"How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in life you will have been all of these." - George Washington Carver
angelbaby is offline  
Old 07-02-2010, 07:13 AM   #45
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso) Give me a forum ...
REWahoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Texas Hill Country
Posts: 42,074
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawg52 View Post
The floor above me was part of our warehouse where the idiot manager stored cleaners and chemicals we sold.
You worked in a building? You had a roof? Sheesh...

__________________
Numbers is hard

When I hit 70, it hit back

Retired in 2005 at age 58, no pension
REWahoo is offline  
Old 07-02-2010, 07:54 AM   #46
Full time employment: Posting here.
Delawaredave5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 606
Quote:
Originally Posted by accountingsucks View Post
Do you actually know a real person who has retired in the 40's or early 50's successfully?
Not really.

I know a few people who sold businesses and don't have to work. I know some people in "forced retirement" because they can't find work. I know people who retired 55-58 with Megacorp pensions.

But I cannot personally name a "true ER'er" - a person who worked a job, saved, invested, and retired in late 40's or early 50's.

Maybe we're all planning about a mythical goal.....
__________________
Delawaredave5 is offline  
I'm 41.
Old 07-02-2010, 08:00 AM   #47
Dryer sheet aficionado
Spartacus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 43
I'm 41.

Worked in big company in sales for 15 years. Made a really good income, also DW and I saved saved saved scrimped and saved some more.
Got the house paid for, the cars, and a really good interest and dividend income producing portfolio, using a 4% w/d rate based on Bob Clyatt's Work Less Live More book, only withdrawing 4% of the current year's portfolio balance.

I inherited nothing. I made an above average income, varying between $80,000 and $140,000...(my wife did not work outside the home), so that was our only income.

I truly am livin' the dream. I think one needs the following in some sort of 'mix'....

1. A decision made fairly early in life that this is a real goal, and that goal becomes one of your top values that you pursue over a fairly long period of 12 or so to 20 years.

2. A spouse that's "in the game" with you on this dream.

3. A pretty darn good income.

4. You have to live in a way where most Americans would say you are cheap. If they're not calling you that to your face, you're not being frugal enough. (I never liked the word cheap. I had lots of fun over the past 20 years, am raising two beautiful kids, travelled alot, but always always always had in the back of my mind an eye for the "frugal way".

5. Continue to be frugal after you pull the plug on the working world.

6. Admit to yourself it IS NOT EASY, not even close to easy.

7. Stay busy doing what you love to do after leaving the work force.

8. Live in a very reasonable cost of living state, nothing like San Fran or LA, or NY......

just my two cents, but it can be done....
__________________
Everyday is Saturday!
Spartacus is offline  
Old 07-02-2010, 08:03 AM   #48
Full time employment: Posting here.
Delawaredave5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 606
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spartacus View Post
just my two cents, but it can be done....
The OP was "do you actually know anyone ?"
__________________
Delawaredave5 is offline  
Old 07-02-2010, 08:12 AM   #49
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 1,037
Retired at age 50 in year 2000 with a 3 year old and 18 month old.

Had a backpacking buddy that retired in early 40s after liquidating the several gun shops he owned. Then hiked the AT.

While I do some seasonal employment (tax prep with a local CPA firm), it's to keep busy in the dog days of winter, the work is not necessary from an income standpoint.

RE2Boys
__________________
RE2Boys is offline  
Old 07-02-2010, 09:17 AM   #50
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Leonidas's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Where the stars at night are big and bright
Posts: 2,847
I know quite a few - mostly former co-workers with a smattering of friends thrown in.
__________________
There is no pleasure in having nothing to do; the fun is having lots to do and not doing it. - Andrew Jackson
Leonidas is offline  
Old 07-02-2010, 09:19 AM   #51
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 195
A guy that I work with on ships retired at 40 from working in IT. His wife kept working for a couple of years on their financial plan, but was laid off last year. She's taken another job for the next year or so before they take off for good. They both dive, he's picked up a captain's license, and will get his dive instructor's ticket before they take off to run a dive boat for fun in the warmer climates. they sold their sailboat last fall and have been getting their house ready to sell in preparation for departure. They don't really need to work for money, but are very Type A people, so end up working when they get involved in any activities generally.
__________________
seabourne is offline  
Old 07-02-2010, 11:04 AM   #52
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 925
I have personally known a few:

One guy retired from the United States Marines around 40 and retired to a small shack on a beautiful river in the Missouri Ozarks. Not for everybody; but, frankly, I envy him in many ways. And, the last time I ran into him, he seemed very happy.

I knew a couple (him: bar owner; her: United State Navy) who retired in their late forties and moved to Costa Rice to retire. Not sure you would call them successful at retirement or not though: They wound up opening a dive shop and growing the business significantly; not of of economic necessity but initially out of spite (falling out with local dive shop; longer, funny story).

One final guy who comes to mind; again, maybe not successful at the retirement thing: Retired very early (40's) from a large credit card processor (saved a lot plus got lucky, right place, right time, when they went public). Went back to work as a programmer a few years later; got fed up after a few years and retired again. Went back to work, again, as a programmer a few years later. Just got fed up and retired yet again. Looking forward to having a large glass of bourbon with him in the near future and teasing him about this whole saga.

In short, FI seems easier to attain than ER in my limited experience.
__________________
If there's one thing in my life that's missing; It's the time I spend alone
Sailing on the cool and bright clear waters; There's lots of those friendly people
Showin me ways to go; And I never want to lose your inspiration
CoolChange is offline  
Old 07-02-2010, 11:35 AM   #53
Full time employment: Posting here.
MuirWannabe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 670
I only know one. She was the head of Marketing here at my Megacorp. She just retired recently at the age of 49. She could have kept going and she had it more or less made. No doubt drawing a very nice salary. But she was willing to leave it all behind for the joys of retirement and living simply. I was impressed.
__________________
“Of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt.” John Muir
MuirWannabe is offline  
Old 07-02-2010, 11:40 AM   #54
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Gone4Good's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 5,381
My old boss quit at 45.
__________________
Retired early, traveling perpetually.
Gone4Good is offline  
Old 07-02-2010, 11:50 AM   #55
Full time employment: Posting here.
cardude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 599
I don't know any personally, in the flesh. I quit pretty early at 45 so all my peers are still working.

Actually I forgot, I do have an "older" buddy who retired at 57. He worked at one of the local plants for 30 years, lived cheaply and saved his money, then took an early package a few years ago. He builds boats when he needs a little extra money now, and fishes-- a lot.
__________________
cardude is offline  
Old 07-02-2010, 12:06 PM   #56
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
walkinwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Denver
Posts: 2,675
Me. ER'd in May '08. Panicked and worked part-time at the end of '09 & early '10, but have got to my senses and am ER'd again.

I plan to be flexible though and if needed, I will have no problems going back to work for a while doing something I like - or if the situation is dire, doing something I don't like. I'd rather enjoy my life now and take an educated risk, than waste the best years of my life chasing an elusive "certainty" in retirement financing.
__________________
walkinwood is offline  
Old 07-02-2010, 12:14 PM   #57
Full time employment: Posting here.
Calgary_Girl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Calgary
Posts: 775
DH and I are still slogging away but the only person I know personally who retired early was my best friend's dad. He retired at 55 from the police force with a full pension.

Reading all the posts, it seems that the majority of people who retired early worked in the public sector which offers very generous pensions. In Canada (I'm suspecting this is the case in the States as well), most private sector companies are moving away from defined benefit pensions to defined contribution pensions which is making it harder for people to retire early. The Federal government has even talked about increasing CPP (Canada Pension Plan) premiums to make the payouts larger in order to level out the playing field with people who work in the public sector and have very generous pension plans.
__________________
I can only be nice to one person today! Today is not your day...tomorrow doesn't look good either.
Calgary_Girl is offline  
Old 07-02-2010, 12:23 PM   #58
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
martyb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Bossier City
Posts: 2,182
I retired earliier this year from one of my 2 jobs...USAF Reserves. 33 years and age 52. Now in just 2.5 more years, I'll retire from my full-time federal careeer, on my 55th birthday. I do not ever intend to work again! Too much fishing & traveling to do....
__________________
martyb is offline  
Old 07-02-2010, 12:26 PM   #59
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
haha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Hooverville
Posts: 22,380
Quote:
Originally Posted by donheff View Post
Ha was right, there are no early retirees. There is just a conspiracy on the Internet by us fakers to make our fellow workers suffer more. We make all these posts about the joys of ER from our desks at mega-corp.
So that is where you are Don, I make mine from an I-phone down in the mines. That is why they are often short.
__________________
"As a general rule, the more dangerous or inappropriate a conversation, the more interesting it is."-Scott Adams
haha is offline  
Old 07-02-2010, 12:32 PM   #60
Recycles dryer sheets
mews's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 477
2 of my 3 brothers - at 50 & 55 as I recall.

One small business owner, one lawyer.

I have ambition, but Mr. Market is not cooperating with my squirreling away :::sigh:::

Oh, and those folks who look at you like you are nuts - they are the same group that thought I was nuts for changing careers.

Some people aren't happy unless they are unhappy.

Ta, mew
__________________

__________________
mews is offline  
Closed Thread


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Hi from Va. Can I retire early? sheehs1 Hi, I am... 7 03-19-2010 08:18 AM
How much is enough to retire early on? DallasGuy FIRE and Money 76 03-11-2010 03:03 PM
Why does everyone want to retire so early? landonew Young Dreamers 117 01-27-2009 05:40 AM
People Who Should Retire But Don't retire@40 Life after FIRE 102 11-17-2008 12:12 PM
Need People For Early Retirement Article bes Hi, I am... 25 02-27-2006 02:04 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:22 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.