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Old 10-19-2012, 06:46 PM   #41
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Fair question. I already discussed a few reasons in previous posts in the past, including insurance-driven medicine, litigation, obnoxious MAs, some very difficult patient situations, etc. At the same time, I have reached a new stage in my life. I am 47 now, so maybe the need to FIRE is a sign of my own "mid life crisis"

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If you guys are getting that kind of fullfillment, then, pardon my asking, but why do/would you WANT to RE? It may not be the best life path for everyone.

Tyro
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Old 10-19-2012, 08:06 PM   #42
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Originally Posted by obgyn65 View Post
Fair question. I already discussed a few reasons in previous posts in the past, including insurance-driven medicine, litigation, obnoxious MAs, some very difficult patient situations, etc. At the same time, I have reached a new stage in my life. I am 47 now, so maybe the need to FIRE is a sign of my own "mid life crisis"
That's valid; I've had a few of those myself.


My free advice is to do it before your health goes. Unfortunately, that cannot be predicted.

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Old 10-19-2012, 10:28 PM   #43
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My free advice is to do it before your health goes. Unfortunately, that cannot be predicted.

Tyro
That's one of my motivations as well. As I get older some things will get harder and eventually impossible and there is no predicting when that will happen. No amount of income or corner office status is going to buy me any more time in which to live or stop me from growing older.

FIREing in mid 2103 at age 47.
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Old 10-19-2012, 10:35 PM   #44
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FIREing in mid 2103 at age 47.
You must be a billionaire with that time machine, no wonder you can afford to FIRE at 47
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Old 10-20-2012, 12:25 AM   #45
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You must be a billionaire with that time machine, no wonder you can afford to FIRE at 47

By which time a billion dollars may not be worth all that much.
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Old 10-20-2012, 11:34 AM   #46
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filling my day with menial tasks and chores like vacuuming, cleaning the house, tending to the yard, etc. doesn't sound like a terribly exciting retirement to me. Anyone out there with a great retirement story?
Menial tasks to you may be satisfying to many. I always felt that finding joy in the simple life and simple things is my keys to happiness. Don't need a whole lot of fancy dinners and entertainment to be contented.
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Old 10-20-2012, 11:40 AM   #47
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If you guys are getting that kind of fullfillment, then, pardon my asking, but why do/would you WANT to RE? It may not be the best life path for everyone.

Tyro
+1

I retired (not early, but before the age I planned upon, many years earlier) due to the stress of both my "j*b" and my personal life responsibilities.

If you are happy with the "skin you're in", then if you want to continue to w*rk and contribute, so be it.

You will find no argument from me, at all.

"Different folks - different strokes"...
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Old 10-23-2012, 07:43 PM   #48
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"I don't think this guy know how to retire-early. I would love to have a chance to try and I bet many of you feel the same way. Retire to do "nothing" so you have to go back to work to make money and have contact with other human beings... what a shame."
As someone who retired much earlier than the traditional age of 65, or so, I can empathize with "this guy."

There are many activities which are based on workplace relationships and when these are gone due to early retirement, there can be quite a bit of time to fill. Add to this the lack of social involvement with folks of our own age (due to most of them still working) and the challenges begin to mount. And finally, the resentment of others (either consciously or otherwise) can result in many uneasy feelings.

That being said, getting off one's butt and addressing the problems will always lead to a solution, maybe not a perfect one at first, but certainly better than moping around feeling sorry for yourself. I'd suggest (from personal experience) becoming involved in volunteering activities, going back to school (real academics towards a degree, not just auditing classes), developing new interests (perhaps based on things you enjoyed when younger), and exploring ways to incorporate your hobbies into paying positions (I became a certified professional ski instructor.)

I guarantee by doing these things, you'll find a new world out there for you to enjoy. My life has become so much more enjoyable and fulfilling over the last twelve years than I ever expected it to be and it continues to get better each day!
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Old 10-24-2012, 08:16 AM   #49
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I "retired" at 47, but not to just sit around. I immediately spent the next year building a house on our 160 acre farm. As in, I knew a carpenter, and helped him to build the house. Hardest work I'd ever done, but fun. Also not something I would have been able to do much later in life.
Now I am raising cattle and tending to the farm and equipment, etc. Not busy constantly, but plenty to keep me from boredom. Luckily I have a couple of neighbors nearby that I trade off with when anyone needs a little extra help.
Hopefully, in another year or two I can even make a small profit on paper to keep the IRS off my back over the farm expenses.
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Old 10-24-2012, 06:20 PM   #50
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I had a lot of pre-retirement practice, W**k was getting in the way of my volunteer stuff. Chasing desert tortoises around Tonto National Forest on Fridays, Master Gardener/Docent at the Desert Botanical Gardens on Saturday. Sunday my spiritual practice with a group of friends. I was worn out by Monday. But I was lucky to have the option of staying home or going in, my choice.
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Old 10-24-2012, 06:44 PM   #51
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Sometimes all the best intentions and planning cannot totally prepare someone for what (early) retirement will feel like. I left work in December 2011, thinking I was "done". Interestingly, away from all the stress and lack of life-work balance, I was able to think clearly about what I wanted to do next for the first time in quite a while. Turns out that I was not done with work, just done with my first career. The pause has been incredibly rejuvenating. Getting to "play", be a better mother and daughter, and deepen friendships are the rewards. I am re-entering the work force with a sense of excitement, in a new field, just after the New Year. For those who have anxiety about leaving the cocoon of work, taking a baby step (sabbatical) might be an option worth considering.
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Old 10-25-2012, 01:53 AM   #52
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.... Interestingly, away from all the stress and lack of life-work balance, I was able to think clearly about what I wanted to do next for the first time in quite a while. Turns out that I was not done with work, just done with my first career. The pause has been incredibly rejuvenating. Getting to "play", be a better mother and daughter, and deepen friendships are the rewards. ....
Here's hoping you won't be insulted by an attagrrl

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Old 10-26-2012, 08:33 AM   #53
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I'm 46 but envision NO regrets when I finally pull the plug on working (right now scheduled for age 60). I've had a job of some sort since I was 13...delivering newspapers, then in high school working at McDonald's, then in college, working campus jobs and a couple of paid writing jobs (30 hours a week of work when I was a senior in college), and then I've worked since. It has been a long road, and while I don't wish away the next 13+ years until I turn 60, I do eagerly await the day I do not HAVE to work any more. Maybe I will just coach track and field or become a track and field official for fun...or play in a blues band (I'm a blues/rock keyboardist), or run more marathons or travel a bit or whatever. I have LOTS of things I want to do when not tied to a money-making job anymore.
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Old 10-29-2012, 08:37 PM   #54
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Fair question. I already discussed a few reasons in previous posts in the past, including insurance-driven medicine, litigation, obnoxious MAs, some very difficult patient situations, etc. At the same time, I have reached a new stage in my life. I am 47 now, so maybe the need to FIRE is a sign of my own "mid life crisis"
Lots of recent articles suggest that many doc's feel decades of constant & increasing stress of medical practice wears them down to the point of burn out. While there are obvious rewards to practicing medicine, I find nothing wrong with doc (or anyone else) deciding to RE before the stress takes its toll on one's skills- or one's health. But that decision to RE may be tougher for docs because it's usu irrevocable. The US system can make it very difficult to re-enter clinical practice after significant time away.
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Old 10-29-2012, 08:53 PM   #55
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Lots of recent articles suggest that many doc's feel decades of constant & increasing stress of medical practice wears them down to the point of burn out. While there are obvious rewards to practicing medicine, I find nothing wrong with doc (or anyone else) deciding to RE before the stress takes its toll on one's skills- or one's health. But that decision to RE may be tougher for docs because it's usu irrevocable. The US system can make it very difficult to re-enter clinical practice after significant time away.
It's interesting how different people view how they want to live out their life. My best friends family doctor is in his 80s having his practice for probably over 40 years. He works 4 hours a day, 4 days a week, and only takes cash. I guess that is his way of enjoying what he does without the aggravating paperwork that probably is a major pain for doctors.
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Old 10-29-2012, 08:56 PM   #56
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my plan

I was pretty sure I might be bored, so I'm signing up to do an Ironman. Anything to keep from having to vacumn
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Old 10-31-2012, 09:51 PM   #57
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I was pretty sure I might be bored, so I'm signing up to do an Ironman. Anything to keep from having to vacumn
Guarantee that will leave little time for boredom! I did one last fall, & my 30wk training program peaked around 15-18hrs/wk of exercise (PLUS time to/from pool, biking roads, showering, etc.). Last summer all I did was w@rk, train, eat, & sleep. Never again! At least not until ER
This weekend I'm running another marathon (my 2nd this year in celebration of turning the double nickel).

Exercise= the only real fountain of youth.
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