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Do you know HOW TO retire-early ???
Old 10-16-2012, 03:11 PM   #1
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Do you know HOW TO retire-early ???

I don't think this guy know how to retire-early. I would love to have a chance to try and I bet many of you feel the same way. Retire to do "nothing" so you have to go back to work to make money and have contact with other human beings... what a shame.

I am almost sure that I will not have the same issue.

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Old 10-16-2012, 04:47 PM   #2
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I guess it depends on how an individual likes his/her w*rk, versus free time. I retired a little over a year ago, and while I enjoy it overall, it isn't total nervana - still have good days and bad days, just not nearly as many bad days as when I w*rked.
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Old 10-16-2012, 05:09 PM   #3
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This guy retired at 41. He worked about 1/2 the years of normal retirees and probably a good ten years less than many people here. Personally, I think if he had worked 30-40 years instead of just about 20, his views on what do do with his free time would be different. Just my 2 cents.
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Old 10-16-2012, 05:24 PM   #4
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He made a key point in his post and that is he knows he can walk away from work any times he wants to. He also indicated that he had choices for what he wants to do and control over his work environment.

In my view, you are retired if you are financially independent. Doing what you want to do doesn't mean you can't or shouldn't be paid for what you are doing. What he was missing in his retirement is involvement with people and organizations that don't pay you for what you do. That is . . . a volunteer experience. It also sound like he couldn't really afford to retire since more money was very important to him or possibly money was part of is self identity and status. He clearly didn't have a life outside of w*rk. Something he should probably work on in the next 10 years.
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Old 10-16-2012, 07:48 PM   #5
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A good illustration of the need to retire to something rather than merely retire from w*rk.

Even if he enjoys his job, it still sounds like a wasted opportunity to me.
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Old 10-16-2012, 08:34 PM   #6
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The thing that struck me was his complaint about being "the lesser person in household decisions" and his comment that one of the reasons he returned to work was for "authority". My guess is that he will never be content in retirement unless and until he can give up that need.


I have often been in positions of great authority and responsibility. In fact, I was professionally trained to take charge and lead men. And yet, one of the benefits of ageing has been the recognition that I do not need to be "in charge" of anyone else to be happy. Indeed, there is a certain peace in recognizing that to truly master yourself is enough challenge for a lifetime.
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Old 10-16-2012, 08:57 PM   #7
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The thing that struck me was his complaint about being "the lesser person in household decisions" .....
Most of us married men are used to being in that position. Why would he think that would change after he retired??
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Old 10-17-2012, 12:25 AM   #8
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a good illustration of the need to retire to something rather than merely retire from w*rk.
+1

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most of us married men are used to being in that position. Why would he think that would change after he retired??
+2
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Old 10-17-2012, 02:25 AM   #9
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surely this post belongs in Its funny joke Thursday!
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Old 10-17-2012, 02:29 AM   #10
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I also retired at 41 but am happy with my retirement. I think there are different personality types and different goals for life.

A 65 year old American friend here in the Philippines who works about 3/4 of the time giving technical seminars in SE Asia was thrown for a loop a few weeks ago when he found out he would not have work until early 2013 (he does not need the money at all). He told me that he does not know how to relax and does not know how he will handle it.

I was in the USA last month and visiting my roommate from graduate school and he (modestly, at my prompting) related to me a great milestone he had made in his career. Another mutual friend has also achieved the heights of our profession. However, after I thought about it, I felt no tinge of regret for retiring early. That being said, those friends can't understand why I retired, either. They love to work and to achieve big things. I am happy for them.
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Old 10-17-2012, 05:53 AM   #11
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I'm on the cusp of 50, and I know there is so much I could do when I ER. Over the years, my so-called social-life at MegaCorp has gotten worse compared to early in career. So, that's not holding me back.

It is the tech industry, and most of the people are from the other side the world. Their interests are completely opposite. Yeah, it was fun going out and playing cricket one time, but it isn't something I want to make a passion out of. Likewise, I don't think they enjoyed the softball game we cooked up. I'm starting to think that one of the major reasons I want to ER is to change back to a more familiar social circle.

So, when I ER there are so many things I can do:
  • Start cooking again, including some fancy meals
  • Vacuum more than 1x per month
  • Volunteer for stuff. So much I could do at church and community. (Meet new people.)
  • Garden more
  • Walk to the store to get groceries
  • Stop and talk to other neighbors walking around, I don't know them today, but they are my neighbors for heaven's sake.
  • Sleep in
  • Manage my finances. The exercises I've done here show I've let them get away from me.
  • Wash the car more than 2x per year
  • And so much more...
We were on the road last weekend, and I overheard a 50-somethings couple next to us say: "She said that retirement has been great. She's had no problem with the time. The minutia of daily life keeps here busy, and she can't understand how she ever did it while working". My guess was they are considering it and pondering what to do in the next step.
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Old 10-17-2012, 10:44 AM   #12
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When I was about to retire, I was a little concerned about the psychological adjustment issues that might pop up. I had worked really hard on financial preparation, but had put almost no thought into psychological preparation.

So, I bookmarked a link to the Zelinski book just in case, and took the plunge. I never needed to read the book, though. Retiring was the best decision I ever made. For some reason I have no problem with being the person in charge of what I do all day long.

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A good illustration of the need to retire to something rather than merely retire from w*rk.
This was the kind of statement that concerned me when I was getting ready to retire. I wasn't retiring TO anything. So, I made a list of things that I would like to do in retirement, just in case. I haven't started on any of them at all. There is too much in my daily life to occupy me pleasantly all day long, without looking for more. Guess in my case I didn't need to retire TO anything, except my own personal freedom from work.
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Old 10-17-2012, 11:56 AM   #13
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So, when I ER there are so many things I can do:
  • Vacuum more than 1x per month
Dude.
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Old 10-17-2012, 12:15 PM   #14
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filling my day with menial tasks and chores like vacuuming, cleaning the house, tending to the yard, etc. doesn't sound like a terribly exciting retirement to me. Anyone out there with a great retirement story?
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Old 10-17-2012, 12:23 PM   #15
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I dunno. I thought RV'ing was fun, but one can always have too much of a good thing. I don't care if one travels by RV'ing or traipsing through airports, you need to space it out.

So, I am cleaning the house and tending the yard right now and enjoying it. When I get tired of that, will think of something else. Maybe ask wife to surf the Web and look for some travel deals. I still want to cruise down the Danube or the Rhine, for example. Yes, only money and time limit what one can do. Just don't do too much of anything, or it will not be fun anymore.

PS. Do not let anyone tell you that a bit of work once in a while cannot be fun. I would still be doing a bit of work, if people with the last project did not want me to do so much for the money they would give. However, I do not rule out going back for a short round. Never say never, heh heh heh...
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Old 10-17-2012, 12:46 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuckanut View Post
This guy retired at 41. He worked about 1/2 the years of normal retirees and probably a good ten years less than many people here. Personally, I think if he had worked 30-40 years instead of just about 20, his views on what do do with his free time would be different. Just my 2 cents.
+1

People have often asked me "Why do you want to retire? Won't you be bored?". My answer is that I've been bored before, but it never occurred to me that work was the antidote...

Then again, if my retirement lasts 40 years, it means I've made centenarian!
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Old 10-17-2012, 01:36 PM   #17
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filling my day with menial tasks and chores like vacuuming, cleaning the house, tending to the yard, etc. doesn't sound like a terribly exciting retirement to me. Anyone out there with a great retirement story?
Why would you choose only menial tasks and chores for yourself, once you retire? I keep those to a minimum and fill my days with activities that I happen to really enjoy. After all, I worked for years to earn my retirement and I DESERVE to have some fun and enjoy it.

What you specifically enjoy is going to be different for every individual. Pretty soon, F will pick me up and we will head for the gym, and then have lunch together. Might not be your idea of fun or an exciting day, but there is nothing in the world that I would rather do.
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Old 10-17-2012, 02:44 PM   #18
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Ha ha. I guess nobody likes vacuuming...

I wasn't coming across very well. Of course I'll be traveling, hiking, visiting family, going out for lunch with DW, surfing the web, goofing off, golfing and doing all that good stuff.

The point is today, when one w*rks, you are so d*mn rushed that chores are yet another endless drudgery to be put off.

However, if you you make the best of chores, they can be invigorating. My other stupid example was walking to the store instead of driving. Idiotic? Not really. Get your exercise and eat too.
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Old 10-17-2012, 04:47 PM   #19
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Any work or chore will expand to take up whatever time a retiree has. It is amazing.

Here's an example. For some time now, I have been running an Ethernet wire across the hall from one spare bedroom to another that has an Ethernet connection. A few days ago, I finally got around to run the wire properly above the ceiling to get rid of that unsightly makeshift wire (I prefer gigabit Ethernet to Wi-Fi for file and media servers). This morning, I was going to rearrange all that mess with the cable modem, the Wi-Fi router, the Ethernet switch, etc... I decided to put up a shelf to hold all that stuff off the hutch of the desk. But I needed two shelf brackets.

I could have gone to Home Depot and back in 30 minutes. But no! I said to my wife that I remembered that Ikea had cheap brackets, and perhaps we should go there for lunch. So, 2 hours later, we got back home with two shelf brackets ($0.50 each), and full from lunch (<$10 for two).

Just now finish putting up the shelf. plugging everything back in, and decide to rest and surf the Web some more. Could have done a bit more work around the house, but hey, why hurry? Spread it out, so the work lasts a bit longer, ya know?
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Old 10-17-2012, 05:04 PM   #20
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Ha ha. I guess nobody likes vacuuming...

I wasn't coming across very well. Of course I'll be traveling, hiking, visiting family, going out for lunch with DW, surfing the web, goofing off, golfing and doing all that good stuff.

The point is today, when one w*rks, you are so d*mn rushed that chores are yet another endless drudgery to be put off.

However, if you you make the best of chores, they can be invigorating. My other stupid example was walking to the store instead of driving. Idiotic? Not really. Get your exercise and eat too.
I see what you mean, now. I think the idea of walking to the store is terrific! So healthy, and fun, too. That's one idea I could really go for.

I just vacuum as needed. Being nearsighted helps.
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