Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-22-2010, 12:08 AM   #61
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 281
One thing to keep in mind is the power of passive income generation. If you make a single custom fly rod you can only sell it once. If you want more income you have to make another fly rod. If you write a book on fly fishing, you can sell that one book a million times over without any extra work except for marketing the book.
__________________

__________________
TooFrugal is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 01-22-2010, 03:26 AM   #62
Dryer sheet aficionado
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 26
Hey, what do you all think about dog walking? I live in a development with a number of professional working couples, lots of dog owners. Was thinking of starting this with my son.
__________________

__________________
Mickslick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2010, 08:29 AM   #63
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Moemg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Sarasota,fl.
Posts: 10,029
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt34 View Post
There are a large number of auctions 'round these parts and I've often given thought to going to them, buying oddball stuff and selling them on Ebay or Amazon auctions. One guy where I work bought a dozen used lawn mowers for a dollar each at a fall auction and sold them in the spring for $50 each. Storage is obviously an issue but I like the numbers.

That's "Plan B" for when I decide to leave my current post-retirement job.


The trick is to find something you like to sell and you have knowledge about . My niece's husband sells motorcycle parts . That seems like a good fit for you ! The thing I like about it is no set hours plus if we want to go away I just stop selling for awhile . It's a good thing to do if you just want a little extra money . Unfortunately some months you make a lot of money and some months not so much so it's not a regular steady income but since mine is used for fun money that works out okay .
__________________
Moemg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2010, 08:39 AM   #64
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Moemg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Sarasota,fl.
Posts: 10,029
A great retirement business in Florida would be to pimp out old guys . There is a real lack of older guys in Florida and I know older woman would pay to show up with a date at neighborhood party . I'd probably just have to pay the guys in casseroles and occasionally do their laundry and they would be happy . Of course you would have to keep meticulous records since you don't want Joe to be showing up at the same trailer park to often .I would not charge extra for s-x I'd throw that in as a bonus . Of course I would charge extra if the guy could still drive , did not wear his pants to high , had hair , danced or takes Viagra .
__________________
Moemg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2010, 09:53 AM   #65
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 637
I have a "drop ship" business online that I have done since being "downsized" 5 years ago. This is where you build a website and add products. Take the order, send the info to the vendor, and they ship the merchandise. I process the order, pay the vendor and collect the difference. I do inventory one product line, but that is not necessary.

It is some work to get started and costs a few thousand to get a decent website up and running. And of course you need to find vendors that will drop ship for you. Most charge a wholesale price and $3-$5 per order drop ship fee. The trick is to find a niche and fill it. Some business and technical skills are needed to be successful IMHO.

I have had the site for about 5 years, and have added one product line per year. I spend about 2 hours a day actually working. Can be more or less as needed. Currently netting nearly 30k pretax income.

That said, I will be selling my site this spring as my husband will retire early next year, I am the only person doing the business and so don't get a break, and our parents are aging and are needing assistance.

But drop shipping might be something to look into for those wanting a "semi-retirement" business.
__________________
bizlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2010, 08:37 PM   #66
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
harley's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Following the nice weather
Posts: 6,418
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moemg View Post
Of course I would charge extra if the guy could still drive , did not wear his pants to high , had hair , danced or takes Viagra .
Sounds like I qualify, as long as you aren't to picky about the location of the hair.
__________________
"Good judgment comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement." - Will Rogers, or maybe Sam Clemens
DW and I - FIREd at 50 (7/06), living off assets
harley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2010, 11:18 PM   #67
Full time employment: Posting here.
flyfishnevada's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Smith
Posts: 743
Quote:
Originally Posted by TooFrugal View Post
One thing to keep in mind is the power of passive income generation. If you make a single custom fly rod you can only sell it once. If you want more income you have to make another fly rod. If you write a book on fly fishing, you can sell that one book a million times over without any extra work except for marketing the book.
Way ahead of you. I am already working on a book. Two actually, one fiction, one about fly fishing.

Does anyone get the impression I don't know what the heck I want to do?
__________________
flyfishnevada is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2010, 11:34 PM   #68
Full time employment: Posting here.
old woman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 551
Something like a laundramat or yard work business or moving business you could employ the kids and their friends. Janitoral business is like that too. We pay 1,200 a month for people to come at night. A woman and son were doing it but have been replaced. She said it took about 4 hours. If you and your wife and children took one customer you could switch off who did it or all go at once. If it would take 4 hours for one it might take 1 hour for 4 people. The work is not a steady pace. Some nights you can rush and just empty the garbage and recycling and do a quick clean of bathrooms and vacumn only parts of the offices. Then on a weekend day or pull an all nighter to do a heavy cleaning like stripping and waxing floors. Your kids will know a lot of teens who want to earn a few dollars so teach the most reliable to do the entire job if you want a longer vacation.

Another idea is to run a home cleaning or nanny service where you hire the crew and find the work. Once you place a crew for a client you just draw a percentage of what you bill as your share. Around here a half day cleaning lady is $90 and the agency gets about half. My brother hired his outside the agency for about half since she got to keep all the money.

You could hire your kids to make cold calls or answer the phones to schedule appointments or even clean houses. You and your spouse could clean houses and take the kids with you. You could do several houses in a single day if you work together you could bond with the children while driving to the next location.
__________________
old woman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2010, 08:05 PM   #69
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
charlie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Dallas
Posts: 1,211
W2R, I am the one who has owned a laundromat for over 40 years. It has been a great source of supplementary income during my 20 years of early retirement.

If the OP wants to retire in Texas, I can make him a goood deal.

Cheers,

charlie
__________________
charlie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2010, 09:55 PM   #70
Administrator
W2R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 38,823
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlie View Post
W2R, I am the one who has owned a laundromat for over 40 years. It has been a great source of supplementary income during my 20 years of early retirement.

If the OP wants to retire in Texas, I can make him a goood deal.

Cheers,

charlie
Thank you, Charlie!! I would have credited you with the idea, but I couldn't remember whose it was. The idea of owning a laundromat in retirement sounds excellent for someone who is mechanically inclined and can keep the machines running.
__________________
Already we are boldly launched upon the deep; but soon we shall be lost in its unshored, harbourless immensities.

- - H. Melville, 1851
W2R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2010, 10:19 AM   #71
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
charlie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Dallas
Posts: 1,211
Although it helps to me mechanically inclined, it is not necessary to the running of a successful laundromat. Of fundamental importance is a good location followed by keeping the place clean, bright and safe, hiring and retaining good people, having reliable repair men on call, managing cash flow, treating customers fairly, etc., etc. In other words, a laundromat is much like any other service business from a management viewpoint.

One cautionary note, however, is that the business is "confining" in the sense that it is hard to get away for extended periods if you don't have a completely trustworthy person to sub for you. Collecting and counting the money, making bank deposits and filling bill changers is normally what the owner routinely does, at least in my case..... not fixing machines.

Cheers,

charlie
__________________
charlie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2010, 11:14 AM   #72
Administrator
W2R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 38,823
Interesting! Thanks, Charlie.
__________________
Already we are boldly launched upon the deep; but soon we shall be lost in its unshored, harbourless immensities.

- - H. Melville, 1851
W2R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2010, 08:41 PM   #73
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Ed_The_Gypsy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: the City of Subdued Excitement
Posts: 5,292
I can't remember, did anyone bring up caretaking?

WELCOME PAGE - The Caretaker Gazette - #1 Source for Caretaker Opportunities since 1983!
__________________
my bumpersticker:
"I am not in a hurry.
I am retired.
And I don't care how big your truck is."
Ed_The_Gypsy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2010, 12:14 AM   #74
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 11,014
Quote:
Originally Posted by old woman View Post
Something like a laundramat or yard work business or moving business you could employ the kids and their friends. Janitoral business is like that too. We pay 1,200 a month for people to come at night. A woman and son were doing it but have been replaced. She said it took about 4 hours. If you and your wife and children took one customer you could switch off who did it or all go at once. If it would take 4 hours for one it might take 1 hour for 4 people. The work is not a steady pace. Some nights you can rush and just empty the garbage and recycling and do a quick clean of bathrooms and vacumn only parts of the offices. Then on a weekend day or pull an all nighter to do a heavy cleaning like stripping and waxing floors. Your kids will know a lot of teens who want to earn a few dollars so teach the most reliable to do the entire job if you want a longer vacation.

Another idea is to run a home cleaning or nanny service where you hire the crew and find the work. Once you place a crew for a client you just draw a percentage of what you bill as your share. Around here a half day cleaning lady is $90 and the agency gets about half. My brother hired his outside the agency for about half since she got to keep all the money.

You could hire your kids to make cold calls or answer the phones to schedule appointments or even clean houses. You and your spouse could clean houses and take the kids with you. You could do several houses in a single day if you work together you could bond with the children while driving to the next location.
Ahem....this is retirement?

I don't think so!
__________________

__________________
Meadbh is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
US businesses ask Congress for relief on pensions Zoocat FIRE and Money 37 11-23-2008 06:32 PM
Good Early Retirement book? rai-zero Young Dreamers 15 02-13-2008 06:08 PM
Small businesses or jobs that you can make your own hours at? summer2007 FIRE and Money 14 10-30-2007 06:50 PM
Who buys and sells small businesses? wabmester FIRE and Money 2 04-29-2007 03:28 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:40 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.