Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Hired the wrong estate attorney...what to do?
Old 02-19-2018, 09:13 PM   #1
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: New York, NY
Posts: 79
Hired the wrong estate attorney...what to do?

Hello, I recently searched for an estate attorney under subject: "Estate Attorney and Executor?" and many of you were so kind and helpful for which, again, thanks so much to all!!!

But alas, I failed to follow ALL that excellent advice and I just realized that I hired a week ago an attorney who, while seems nice and interested in the work...she's not board certified and her estate work is only 25% and 9 years experience.

I was exhausted from a long search so when I found this nice atty. I was relieved and hastened to sign the contract and pay the deposit requested... without checking her background.

My question: Would it be smart to explain to this atty. I made a mistake and to return part of the deposit? Then seek a board certified attorney who specializes in trusts, wills, estates? Or should I stay with her?

I'm terribly embarrassed...Thank you so very much for your opinion.
__________________

Rosedala is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 02-19-2018, 09:22 PM   #2
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
RobbieB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Central CA
Posts: 3,277
I would think that a licensed attorney with 9 years practice should be able to handle it.

Is the estate huge and complicated?
__________________

__________________
Retired at 59 in 2014. Should have done it sooner but I worried too much.
RobbieB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2018, 09:27 PM   #3
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Long Island
Posts: 386
What are your estate issues? Attorneys can work 80 hours per week without batting an eye. Twenty hours per week of estate work does not mean that she is without experience.
__________________
Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.
MarieIG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2018, 11:17 PM   #4
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: New York, NY
Posts: 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobbieB View Post
I would think that a licensed attorney with 9 years practice should be able to handle it.

Is the estate huge and complicated?
Thank you Robbie, no, it's very simple and small and it has a Revocable Living Trust, and she'll have to be an executor and a health care proxy too. Do you really think she'd be efficient enough without having become board certified and having done only 25% of estate work?
Rosedala is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2018, 11:28 PM   #5
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: New York, NY
Posts: 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarieIG View Post
What are your estate issues? Attorneys can work 80 hours per week without batting an eye. Twenty hours per week of estate work does not mean that she is without experience.
Hello Marie and thank you. I don't know what you mean by "estate issues", if you mean "possessions" I have nothing like real estate properties or such. I do own CDs, Money Markets, Savings, Annuities and some Municipal Bonds. I bought the Trust to avoid probate. Still, because of the many tax and estate changes I wonder if she'll be up to them not being a board certified...that's why I worry.
Rosedala is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2018, 02:32 AM   #6
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Long Island
Posts: 386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rosedala View Post
Hello Marie and thank you. I don't know what you mean by "estate issues", if you mean "possessions" I have nothing like real estate properties or such. I do own CDs, Money Markets, Savings, Annuities and some Municipal Bonds. I bought the Trust to avoid probate. Still, because of the many tax and estate changes I wonder if she'll be up to them not being a board certified...that's why I worry.
Forgive me for being brief. I have to get up in the morning. By issues, do you expect litigation? Do you expect the "trust" to be administered for a period of years for the benefit of a charity or other? What do you want to do with your money after your death?

Does you annuity have a death benefit or expire on your death? It appears that you could just list a beneficiary on your accounts as a TOD.

Those with large, complex estates (and nothing you have written thus far gives me that idea) look for a JD, LLM, CPA. Really not sure what you mean by board certified - when it comes to a NY lawyer.
__________________
Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.
MarieIG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2018, 04:46 AM   #7
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Beach and Mountain
Posts: 340
Board certified is not important, unless you have some extenuating circumstances. Your estate sounds pretty easy. Just go with this attorney.
Z3Dreamer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2018, 06:28 AM   #8
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Florence, AL/Helen, GA
Posts: 2,581
I don't know in many states that there is a certification of any kind for any specialization. That is why they have a disclaimer in their advertising stating as such.

Many general attorney practices can handle wills and simple estates. It is when someone is very wealthy and owns businesses and has complicated trusts that a high line specialized attorney is required.
Bamaman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2018, 06:41 AM   #9
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
ivinsfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 2,803
Why don't all you helpful posters go read the other thread started by this OP, they seem to make a habit of being confused.
ivinsfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2018, 09:55 AM   #10
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: New York, NY
Posts: 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarieIG View Post
Forgive me for being brief. I have to get up in the morning. By issues, do you expect litigation? Do you expect the "trust" to be administered for a period of years for the benefit of a charity or other? What do you want to do with your money after your death?

Does you annuity have a death benefit or expire on your death? It appears that you could just list a beneficiary on your accounts as a TOD.

Those with large, complex estates (and nothing you have written thus far gives me that idea) look for a JD, LLM, CPA. Really not sure what you mean by board certified - when it comes to a NY lawyer.
Oh Marie, this is fine. You're right I don't expect any litigation at my death or any businesses to continue on my Trust, and instead I will write to close all my accounts and give the monies to those listed on Will and Trust.

I don't know what JD and LLM are but...is a CPA all I need? I know about TOD and it's something I'll think about. I wish I had been explained decades ago when I first bought the documents. And my present, new attorney isn't advising anything either....

I read often something like.: "A Board Certified Attorney has demonstrated skill and expertise in a particular field and has proven it through rigorous examination and testing by an accredited organization." But if I don't need it, I'm glad.

I'm thinking whether I should use only TOD or POD and get rid of the Trust altogether...back to the drawing board, good old internet...

Thank you so much for those important points!
Rosedala is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2018, 10:21 AM   #11
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: New York, NY
Posts: 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Z3Dreamer View Post
Board certified is not important, unless you have some extenuating circumstances. Your estate sounds pretty easy. Just go with this attorney.
Thank you so much!!! I feel a lot better now. I knew this website is filled with extraordinarily smart and generous answering members!
Rosedala is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2018, 10:31 AM   #12
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: New York, NY
Posts: 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bamaman View Post
I don't know in many states that there is a certification of any kind for any specialization. That is why they have a disclaimer in their advertising stating as such.

Many general attorney practices can handle wills and simple estates. It is when someone is very wealthy and owns businesses and has complicated trusts that a high line specialized attorney is required.

Oh I understand, but it's in NYC where this concept is all over about attorneys, physicians and a few other professionals.
I realize by now that my present new attorney will do.

THANK YOU Bamaman, THANK YOU ALL for your most valuable help.
Rosedala is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2018, 10:46 AM   #13
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Gotadimple's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,875
You need an attorney, a JD, if it is your wish to hire one as your executor. All attorneys are JD (doctor of jurisprudence).
__________________
Only got A dimple, would have preferred 2!
Gotadimple is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2018, 11:13 AM   #14
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: New York, NY
Posts: 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gotadimple View Post
You need an attorney, a JD, if it is your wish to hire one as your executor. All attorneys are JD (doctor of jurisprudence).
Oh, all attorneys are JD? Also, does an attorney have to be a JD to act as executor? I asked my new attorney I wanted her to be my executor and she consented. I'll have to make double sure and ask whether she is a JD. Thanks so much Gotadimple for clarifying this to me.

[The more I learn the more I find new to learn...I wonder why a society allows such sensitive matter to be so needlessly complicated]
Rosedala is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2018, 11:35 AM   #15
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Colorado Mountains
Posts: 2,516
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rosedala View Post
Oh, all attorneys are JD? Also, does an attorney have to be a JD to act as executor? I asked my new attorney I wanted her to be my executor and she consented. I'll have to make double sure and ask whether she is a JD. Thanks so much Gotadimple for clarifying this to me.

[The more I learn the more I find new to learn...I wonder why a society allows such sensitive matter to be so needlessly complicated]
JD stands for Lawyer. (Nobody said they could spell very well. )

Well, OK, Juris Doctorate is probably closer, but they all mean the same thing.
Hermit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2018, 12:06 PM   #16
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 14,336
I am with all the others... a simple will etc. can be done by any competent attorney... so the question is is she competent?

They have simple wills, trust, power of attorney already to go and just fill in a few blanks... they make changes to the canned ones when law changes...

But, they are usually good even if it has changed.... I just gave one for my mom to a facility and it is 20 years old.... no problems...
Texas Proud is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2018, 05:12 PM   #17
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Southwest Florida
Posts: 354
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gotadimple View Post
You need an attorney, a JD, if it is your wish to hire one as your executor. All attorneys are JD (doctor of jurisprudence).


No they’re not. Many have LLB’s - Bachelor of Laws. Also, JD stands for Juris Doctor or Doctor of Laws. Doctor of
Jurisprudence is a different degree.
Gill
Gill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2018, 07:19 PM   #18
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Long Island
Posts: 386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rosedala View Post
Oh Marie, this is fine. You're right I don't expect any litigation at my death or any businesses to continue on my Trust, and instead I will write to close all my accounts and give the monies to those listed on Will and Trust.

I don't know what JD and LLM are but...is a CPA all I need? I know about TOD and it's something I'll think about. I wish I had been explained decades ago when I first bought the documents. And my present, new attorney isn't advising anything either....

I read often something like.: "A Board Certified Attorney has demonstrated skill and expertise in a particular field and has proven it through rigorous examination and testing by an accredited organization." But if I don't need it, I'm glad.

I'm thinking whether I should use only TOD or POD and get rid of the Trust altogether...back to the drawing board, good old internet...

Thank you so much for those important points!
Hi, I didn't mean to be confusing. A JD, is just a juris doctor - a law degree. LLM is a masters in law, usually require a year of intense study, often with a specialty. Some lawyers are also CPAs. But a CPA is not going to draft a will or represent your estate in Surrogate's Court. My concern is that you are purchasing services that you just don't need.
__________________
Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.
MarieIG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2018, 07:30 PM   #19
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: New York, NY
Posts: 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermit View Post
JD stands for Lawyer. (Nobody said they could spell very well. )

Well, OK, Juris Doctorate is probably closer, but they all mean the same thing.

Oh....thank you now I know! Thank you.
Rosedala is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2018, 07:33 PM   #20
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: New York, NY
Posts: 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas Proud View Post
I am with all the others... a simple will etc. can be done by any competent attorney... so the question is is she competent?

They have simple wills, trust, power of attorney already to go and just fill in a few blanks... they make changes to the canned ones when law changes...

But, they are usually good even if it has changed.... I just gave one for my mom to a facility and it is 20 years old.... no problems...
Yes I understand, but the deed is done now. I will at least help others with a similar estate. Thank you.
__________________

Rosedala is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
attorney, background check, estate planning, mistake


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
I don't think I could be hired today BOBOT Other topics 63 01-17-2013 05:49 PM
Have you ever hired a day laborer? Purron Other topics 41 12-08-2009 11:15 AM
My replacement has been hired!!! Puzzley FIRE and Money 3 10-23-2007 12:23 PM
Hired back right away as a consultant scrinch FIRE and Money 13 10-29-2006 07:36 AM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:53 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.