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Old 01-01-2011, 05:01 PM   #41
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Not worked out details; have more than I did.
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Old 01-01-2011, 05:03 PM   #42
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Yeah, but being as Scroogy as I am, I want to know how and why, so that I can continue to have more, more, more...
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Old 01-01-2011, 05:08 PM   #43
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Yeah, but being as Scroogy as I am, I want to know how and why, so that I can continue to have more, more, more...

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Old 01-01-2011, 05:12 PM   #44
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Eh, perhaps I should want "more" of something other than money too.
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Old 01-01-2011, 05:20 PM   #45
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Eh, perhaps I should want "more" of something other than money too.
Yes, more free time, strength, intelligence, wisdom, compassion, love, peace, joy, respect, etc. More money definitely does not hurt.
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Old 01-01-2011, 05:39 PM   #46
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That surely is a long list.

And I thought that I was already too greedy.

But philosophically, why wanting more money is called greed, but desire of other "things" is OK? Of course I am not talking about altruistic things like world peace and such.
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Old 01-01-2011, 05:39 PM   #47
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About 7% overall. Not as good as it should have been. I have made some changes in my portfolio in addition to rebalancing.

Resolving to pay less attention to my money and more to my family.
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Old 01-01-2011, 06:07 PM   #48
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Vanguard calculates my return at 21.4 percent but it excludes all my linked accounts
ie 401k, other Ira's etc. It includes new savings which are significant!

Is there a simple formula to calculate return? One that takes into account new savings?

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Old 01-01-2011, 06:55 PM   #49
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Vanguard calculates my return at 21.4 percent but it excludes all my linked accounts
ie 401k, other Ira's etc. It includes new savings which are significant!

Is there a simple formula to calculate return? One that takes into account new savings?

torres9
One reasonable way to do it is:
ROI % for the year = [final portfolio number/(starting number + new contributions during the year) - 1] x 100

Thus your final number is not inflated by the contributions during the year, yet you assume all gains were due the start of the year investments which IMO is "good enough".

This is how Quicken computes ROI.

Audrey
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Old 01-01-2011, 06:57 PM   #50
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Vanguard calculates my return at 21.4 percent but it excludes all my linked accounts
ie 401k, other Ira's etc. It includes new savings which are significant!

Is there a simple formula to calculate return? One that takes into account new savings?

torres9
Use XIRR function in Excel.To find your return, list the dates of your deposits and withdrawals in one column. In the next column, enter your deposit amounts as positive numbers and your withdrawals (or the current value of your portfolio) as negative numbers. Pick an empty cell and enter "=XIRR(values, dates)" to show your return. For example, if you enter the 4 values in column B starting from row 1 and their respective dates in column A, enter this formula: =XIRR(B1:B4,A1:A4) in B5.

=XIRR(B1:B11,A1:A11)
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Old 01-01-2011, 07:23 PM   #51
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It was a hell of year for me and obviously a good year to have an aggressive portfolio of 85/15.

My IRAs which I like to use as a baseline because there are no withdrawals was up 18%.
My liquid assets were up a modest 7.4%. However, I started the year with 240K in mortgage debt which is all gone. So my liquid assets increased by 16.6% after living expenses.

According to the county assessor my house rose 2% which help push my total net worth to an all time high barely exceeding my previous best in 2005 and when I retired in 1999.

My dividend and interest income was also up by 5%, which is gratifying but it is still 10%+ below 2006-2008 level due to the large number of dividend cuts in 2008 and plunging interest rates.

I am grateful for this board because there is no other place I can gloat. I have several friends out of work, one of my sister and couple of friends moved most of their savings out of stocks and either cash or bonds. To say it would be unseemly to talk about a great year for me this was financially would be an understatement. Anyway I can appreciate when they say that recession has ended for Wall St. but not for main street, and I guess I must be part of Wall St.
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Old 01-01-2011, 07:26 PM   #52
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That surely is a long list.

And I thought that I was already too greedy.

But philosophically, why wanting more money is called greed, but desire of other "things" is OK? Of course I am not talking about altruistic things like world peace and such.
"Greed" is an attempt to possess more than one needs or deserves while "desire" is wanting something passionately. In Buddhism, the distinction between greed and desire, however, is artificial. Craving passionately (for anything) is a hindrance toward happiness.
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Old 01-01-2011, 07:28 PM   #53
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OK, anyone in a cash position, how did you do?
Anyone hear from Dex?



My port still hovers at about 70% fixed despite my pathetic efforts to dip my toe deeper into the equity markets. The good news is that the total port was pretty stable over the '07 to '09 unpleasantness (due to my low exposure to equities and decent performing fixed - oh, and my ballast of a few lb of gold and couple hundred pounds of silver. Thanks, dad!! )

The fixed portion of my port is at about 3% for the year. My I Bonds are less than 4 and the biggest portion of my fixed is almost exactly 2 in my GIF. My insurance products (including a 25 year old SPDA) are a bit above 4% (due to guarantees from many years ago).

The equity portion of my port, I haven't calculated yet, but I'm guessing it's in the very low double digit range as most are in Vanguard (S&P 500, Tot Stock mkt., emerging markets, total Euro ex-US, etc). Oh, and DW's psssst. Wellesley (and Wellington, heh, heh). We combine our funds into THE PORT as opposed to a her's and mine.

I'm happy for those with total port increases in the 15+% range. I'll admit to just a touch of jealousy (or maybe it's really more a feeling of regret that I didn't have more courage like the rest of the group). Still, I can survive on a 2% or so SWR and haven't taken my SS yet. I'd like to think I'm in the "sweet spot" of AA. Whether that turns out to be true will only be known by looking in the rear view mirror. In any case, I'm SWAGing the total port performance for 2010 at about 5 - 6%. Since my stash is "enough" (Is there such a thing?), I don't see the need to push it at this point. Of course, YMMV.
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Old 01-01-2011, 07:28 PM   #54
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I am grateful for this board because there is no other place I can gloat.
I enjoy the gloating posts. It's the way we learn from other's successes.

I also love the ones where people say they need to spend more money.
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Old 01-01-2011, 07:31 PM   #55
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Anyone hear from Dex?
I'm thinking he saw this thread....End of the world: May 21, 2011 ...and is out spending his cash.
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Old 01-01-2011, 07:38 PM   #56
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I was not sure how to compute this, but audreyh1's post seems like a pretty reasonable start:

Quote:
Originally Posted by audreyh1 View Post
One reasonable way to do it is:
ROI % for the year = [final portfolio number/(starting number + new contributions during the year) - 1] x 100

Thus your final number is not inflated by the contributions during the year, yet you assume all gains were due the start of the year investments which IMO is "good enough".

This is how Quicken computes ROI.

Audrey
I am in distribution phase so instead of adding new contributions during the year, I subtracted withdrawals during the year.

Using audreyh1's method this way, my answer is 12.72% (45:55 equities:fixed)

After 2008-2009, I am pretty happy about this!
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Old 01-01-2011, 07:47 PM   #57
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I was not sure how to compute this, but audreyh1's post seems like a pretty reasonable start:



I am in distribution phase so instead of adding new contributions during the year, I subtracted withdrawals during the year.

Using audreyh1's method this way, my answer is 12.72% (45:55 equities:fixed)

After 2008-2009, I am pretty happy about this!
Here is how Quicken handles that scenario. It basically adds any withdrawals to the final portfolio number to compute ROI.

ROI % for the year = [(final portfolio number + withdrawals during the year)/starting number - 1] x 100

Audrey
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Old 01-01-2011, 07:51 PM   #58
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Here is how Quicken handles that scenario. It basically adds any withdrawals to the final portfolio number to compute ROI.

ROI % for the year = [(final portfolio number + withdrawals during the year)/starting number - 1] x 100

Audrey
Thank you!!

That comes to 10.53%, (45:55 equities:fixed).
I'm still pretty happy and still dancing along with this little emoticon:
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Old 01-01-2011, 07:54 PM   #59
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Using Fidelity's calculator, right at 9.5%. Not bad with a 25/75 allocation. My equities are mostly individual stocks.
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Old 01-01-2011, 08:01 PM   #60
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I was not sure how to compute this, but audreyh1's post seems like a pretty reasonable start:



I am in distribution phase so instead of adding new contributions during the year, I subtracted withdrawals during the year.

Using audreyh1's method this way, my answer is 12.72% (45:55 equities:fixed)

After 2008-2009, I am pretty happy about this!
12.72% is a good return. You may want to include dividends, if any, as new contributions.
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