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Old 12-13-2008, 07:23 PM   #21
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Germans don't really have to worry too much about retirement because like most developed countries, they have a social safety net (so called cradle to grave society). They have access to excellent universal health care system, they are very frugal and most importantly they don't have to worry about eating dog food in old age like most Americans have to worry about.
Just curious about the statement that most Americans have to worry about eating dog food in old age. I really wonder if that is true.

Can you point to examples, I really would like to know where that data comes from. I live in a very socially active city and have never read of a local being forced to eat dog food.

Anyone else have
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Old 12-13-2008, 07:34 PM   #22
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Just curious about the statement that most Americans have to worry about eating dog food in old age. I really wonder if that is true.

Can you point to examples, I really would like to know where that data comes from. I live in a very socially active city and have never read of a local being forced to eat dog food.

Anyone else have
SInce beans and rice and even chicken wings are usually cheaper than dogfood, I would imagine that anyone who was eating dogfood had other issues.

Ha
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Old 12-13-2008, 08:44 PM   #23
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SInce beans and rice and even chicken wings are usually cheaper than dogfood, I would imagine that anyone who was eating dogfood had other issues.

Ha
Well, a Puperoni has less salt, fat and IMHO tastes better than a Slim Jim.
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Old 12-13-2008, 08:52 PM   #24
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SInce beans and rice and even chicken wings are usually cheaper than dogfood, I would imagine that anyone who was eating dogfood had other issues.

Ha
Heck at Pike Place Market, the small joint with the chicken gizzards and livers, you can get 2 chicken wings, and a Jo-Jo potato for about $3.50.

At Turf, you can get a chili cheese burger and fries for $5. Enough food on that plate for 2 days.

So I don't get the "dog food" nonsense. Where does that come from? [MODERATOR EDIT]
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Old 12-13-2008, 08:54 PM   #25
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Well, a Puperoni has less salt, fat and IMHO tastes better than a Slim Jim.
Yeah but a Puperoni has 10 grams of gunpowder? So careful!
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Old 12-13-2008, 10:21 PM   #26
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Heck at Pike Place Market, the small joint with the chicken gizzards and livers, you can get 2 chicken wings, and a Jo-Jo potato for about $3.50.

At Turf, you can get a chili cheese burger and fries for $5. Enough food on that plate for 2 days.

So I don't get the "dog food" nonsense. Where does that come from? [MODERATOR EDIT]
Are you the guy who wrote about Turf a few months ago? I bet you can get a lot more than a chili cheese burger and fries at Turf. Like 4+ food poisoning!

What is the name of the place you referenced in the market? Can you describe where it is? I like the cioppino or steamers or raw oysters at Jack's Fish bar, or somtimes a sausage at the German sausage place about 5 or 6 stalls north from the Pike St entrance, on the main level west side. Some chicken innards might be nice as a changup.

Ha
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Old 12-14-2008, 10:06 AM   #27
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Germans don't really have to worry too much about retirement because like most developed countries, they have a social safety net (so called cradle to grave society). They have access to excellent universal health care system, they are very frugal and most importantly they don't have to worry about eating dog food in old age like most Americans have to worry about.

Wow, sounds like one hell of a utopia. I guess it's easy to see it that way when you ignore the chronic high unemployment, staggering deficits (even by our standards). You should also consider their onerous payroll and income taxes, tremendous hurdles for starting new businesses, etc.
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Old 12-14-2008, 11:11 AM   #28
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Wow, sounds like one hell of a utopia. I guess it's easy to see it that way when you ignore the chronic high unemployment, staggering deficits (even by our standards). You should also consider their onerous payroll and income taxes, tremendous hurdles for starting new businesses, etc.
And have you seen the size of their cars!!!
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Old 12-14-2008, 03:53 PM   #29
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Ive noticed with dog food my hair is more shiny.
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Old 12-14-2008, 04:38 PM   #30
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What is the name of the place you referenced in the market? Can you describe where it is? I like the cioppino or steamers or raw oysters at Jack's Fish bar, or somtimes a sausage at the German sausage place about 5 or 6 stalls north from the Pike St entrance, on the main level west side. Some chicken innards might be nice as a changup.

Ha
Ha, I dig the pierogi at the Russian bakery across the street from Pike Place, up a couple of shops from the cheese factory. Can't remember the name, but the mushroom, cheese and onion one is fantastic. Too bad I won't be in Seattle for a while -- those are good.
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Old 12-14-2008, 04:57 PM   #31
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Spent three years in Germany.
Houses - Taxes were low till house finished. So you saw a lot of un-painted houses. Many duplexes. Kid's family in the basement, Mom and Pop upstairs, that is if the basement was not rented to a GI

Cars - Very strict inspection program. Old clunkers not allowed on the road.

Retirement - German men did not worry. Most drank themselves to death before retirement. There was a brewery in every town.

Enjoyed the three yeas, but would not want to live there forever.
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Old 12-14-2008, 05:08 PM   #32
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Ok, now that I'm done hijacking my own thread, I'm finding the responses here interesting, and somewhat in line with my own experiences living in Belgium.

What really struck me, living in Belgium, was how homogeneous the social classes were. People wore similar clothes, drove similar cars, and had similar diets, vacations, and "stuff." Wealth, when it showed up, showed up in housing, family lineage, and where one spent one's vacation. There wasn't a lot of disparity between the classes, because the rich didn't seem to spend their money extravagantly, and the poor spent their money on quality items, just few of them.

It was an interesting education for a US teenager. But, I had no idea how retirement worked there (still don't), so it's interesting to hear from those who have more pertinent experience.

And as for shopping once a week -- we went to the baker's every day (by bicycle) and the greengrocer's and market once a week, because market day was only once a week. Our meals were simple and repetitive, but I loved what we ate. (Basically, meat, boiled potatoes and an in-season vegetable). In fact, my whole year there was fairly simple but very rich. It sounds like this was, perhaps, a very typical western European experience.
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Old 12-14-2008, 05:10 PM   #33
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Ok, now that I'm done hijacking my own thread, I'm finding the responses here interesting, and somewhat in line with my own experiences living in Belgium.

What really struck me, living in Belgium, was how homogeneous the social classes were. People wore similar clothes, drove similar cars, and had similar diets, vacations, and "stuff." Wealth, when it showed up, showed up in housing, family lineage, and where one spent one's vacation. There wasn't a lot of disparity between the classes, because the rich didn't seem to spend their money extravagantly, and the poor spent their money on quality items, just few of them.

It was an interesting education for a US teenager. But, I had no idea how retirement worked there (still don't), so it's interesting to hear from those who have more pertinent experience.

And as for shopping once a week -- we went to the baker's every day (by bicycle) and the greengrocer's and market once a week, because market day was only once a week. Our meals were simple and repetitive, but I loved what we ate. (Basically, meat, boiled potatoes and an in-season vegetable). In fact, my whole year there was fairly simple but very rich. It sounds like this was, perhaps, a very typical western European experience.

Neat how socialism and capitalism works isnt it.
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Old 12-14-2008, 06:46 PM   #34
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Ha, I dig the pierogi at the Russian bakery across the street from Pike Place, up a couple of shops from the cheese factory. Can't remember the name, but the mushroom, cheese and onion one is fantastic. Too bad I won't be in Seattle for a while -- those are good.
Yes, I know that place and I like it too. PM me the next time you are coming to town and we can hang out a little.

Ha
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Old 12-15-2008, 12:10 PM   #35
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Wealth, when it showed up, showed up in housing, family lineage, and where one spent one's vacation.
Conspicuous consumption is often seen as poor taste in many parts of Western Europe. Plus, people are afraid of the taxman. A lavish lifestyle can be seen as an open invitation for a tax audit. Hence wealth often remains hidden from the public eye. If you are rich in much of Western Europe, you want to blend in, not stick out.
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Old 12-18-2008, 04:14 PM   #36
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Hey all,

I'm living in Germany now. Wife is studying here, so we've rented our place out in Tallinn and that is covering our rent here. Nice smaller town in the Southern wine region.

Anyway, interesting thing to note about Germans is that they have a very low home ownership rate. Only about 40% of Germans own their own abode. Renting for life is how most do it. Apparently it's more tax friendly to rent and as mentioned before, a large down payment is needed to get a mortgage, which keeps younger people out. Someone told me only the elderly and the rich own their home.

Anyway, we're enjoying it here. Light snow was falling over the hillside vineyards all morning long.
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