Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-14-2014, 10:28 PM   #21
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Ready's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Southern California
Posts: 1,823
Quote:
Originally Posted by Senator View Post
In my head, retirement is for Ďoldí people, not people like myself.
Old relative to what? I retired last year at age 46, so 54 sounds pretty old to me.

I have no desire to work until 54 years old before I have my time to myself. Our society is trained to teach everyone they must work until 65. Some folks are still quite healthy at 65 and have many years to travel and have fun before physical and/or mental limits slow them down. But some folks are already there at 65 and may have missed out on enjoying a few healthy years without the hassles of going to work every day.

If you are 54 and in good health, go enjoy yourself. Why take a chance that you may keep working until your health fails and then not be able to enjoy your free time doing what you want?
__________________

__________________
Ready is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 02-15-2014, 03:13 AM   #22
Recycles dryer sheets
ikubak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 389
Great job so far. How will I get the courage? I fear running out of time more than I fear running out of money.

I still have a year to go to vest, so I am still working. The way I look at it is I'm 51 and know I won't live forever. Currently, my annual expenses are about 3% of my portfolio. Within a decade or so, annuities and pensions will cover all my annual expenses. Success to me is doing what you want to do whenever you want to do it. If you like your work, by all means keep doing it. But if there are other things you want to do, keep in mind that your time is limited.
__________________

__________________
Retire date Jan. 5, 2018
ikubak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2014, 03:28 AM   #23
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 101
Once I had had my number, plus a small contingency, I pulled the plug. It was that simple.
__________________
Ozstache is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2014, 08:37 AM   #24
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 882
Quote:
Originally Posted by clifp View Post
24 rental units you do the property management and the maintenance on!. Senator you are not retiring you are just quitting one of your two fulltime jobs.
Truly. Most people who evaluate the returns on their real estate investment don't impute the expense of their time. As a result, they may be overstating the investment returns on the real estate. Not that it might not be a good investment but you do need to split out "the job" and "the investment."

This is also a big mistake some make when they evaluate franchise opportunities.
__________________
jebmke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2014, 09:25 AM   #25
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 5,326
Senator, if you like your jobs you don't have to fully retire. Many wealthy people never do, because they enjoy what they do -

Why the Wealthy Never Retire - The Wealth Report - WSJ

Just like Warren Buffett, Betty White and Stephen King will probably never retire. But three different jobs and 80 hours a week doesn't sound like you are leaving enough time outside of work for a healthy and balanced life. If you had a year to live, would you spend it working your three jobs?

Do you have one of your careers you really enjoy over the other?
__________________
daylatedollarshort is offline   Reply With Quote
Two "Clinchers" for Me
Old 02-15-2014, 10:27 AM   #26
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Suburban Woods in Ohio
Posts: 503
Two "Clinchers" for Me

My assets are NO WAY in your ball park. I retired on a modest income, but am hurting for nothing and do have a lot of fun!

Two Sources of the Courage You Mention:

1. Asking myself, "LitGal, if you died tomorrow, what would you wish you had done?"

The list was very long. Since no one knows how many years of health and mobility she will enjoy, I started looking for ways to expand the number of years I could work on that list. (The career had been great. But it could now be easily crossed off the list.) Eg., the "bucket list" syndrome.

2. The Broadway production of "You Can't Take It With You," starring Jason Robards, Colleen Dewhurst, George Rose, Maureen Anderman. Produced in 1984, available on-line for about $12.

Won the Pulitzer Prize in the late 1930's, HILARIOUS, and deeply inspiring.
DH and I watch it at least once a year, just for the pure joy of it. (We wore out the VHS recording of it we taped back in the '80's. Happily found a DVD on line last month; so now we can watch it forever.)

A favorite line: "Grandpa could have been a rich man.........but it took too much time."
******************************************

IMHO, it sounds like you have plenty of both, $ AND time. You are rich indeed. Enjoy your life!


__________________
"Everything becomes more itself." --C.S. Lewis
LitGal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2014, 03:41 PM   #27
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
HFWR's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Lawn chair in Texas
Posts: 12,964
The question is "Why have you been working and saving?"

If the answer is FIRE, well then, hop to it!
__________________
Have Funds, Will Retire

...not doing anything of true substance...
HFWR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2014, 06:15 PM   #28
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Torrance
Posts: 112
What makes a king out of a slave?
What makes the flag on the mast to wave?
What makes the elephant charge his tusk,
in the misty mist, or the dusky dusk?
What makes the muskrat guard his musk?
What makes the sphinx the seventh wonder?
What makes the dawn come up like thunder?
What makes the Hottentot so hot?
What puts the "ape" in apricot?
What have they got that I ain't got?
__________________
bob boag is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2014, 06:34 PM   #29
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
brewer12345's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 16,391
Quote:
Originally Posted by bob boag View Post
What makes a king out of a slave?
What makes the flag on the mast to wave?
What makes the elephant charge his tusk,
in the misty mist, or the dusky dusk?
What makes the muskrat guard his musk?
What makes the sphinx the seventh wonder?
What makes the dawn come up like thunder?
What makes the Hottentot so hot?
What puts the "ape" in apricot?
What have they got that I ain't got?
Something to do with the opposite sex, I believe.
__________________
"There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest have to pee on the electric fence for themselves."



- Will Rogers
brewer12345 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2014, 06:44 PM   #30
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
brewer12345's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 16,391
One of the other reasons you would want to bail on at least the day job is all the ridiculous incentives you have to do so. Just off the top of my head for stuff I have already stumbled across:

- 0% tax rate on cap gains and qualified dividends
- Obamacare subsidies out the wazoo
- Any other taxable income being in the 10 or 15% bracket rather than 2x% or 3X%
- No Social Security or Medicare taxes to pay
- Roth conversions at favorable rates
- Lots of other silly little things. I just stumbled across the fact that in my state there is a grant that matches dollar for dollar 529 contributions up to $500 if your AGI is under a certain level (64k).

If you have accumulated enough capital to be a member of the idle rich there are massive disincentives to actually work for a living.
__________________
"There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest have to pee on the electric fence for themselves."



- Will Rogers
brewer12345 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2014, 10:11 PM   #31
gone traveling
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Eastern PA
Posts: 3,851
An oldie, but it shows why I retired earlier than "normal".

Remember, you will never be younger than you are today ...
Attached Images
File Type: gif WhyRetire.gif (60.0 KB, 197 views)
__________________
rescueme is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2014, 11:50 AM   #32
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Cobra9777's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,132
Throughout my pre-retirement struggle with this question, I found that my similarly-situated coworkers fell into one of two camps:

1) Work defines them. They love their job and have no significant interests or purpose outside their work.
2) Work is a means to FI. They love their non-work endeavors and begin to resent the lack of time for these endeavors due to increasing job demands.

I fell in the second camp and thus pulled the trigger as soon as it was clear the finances would work. Many of my friends are still working, not because they have to, but because they don't know what else to do when they wake up every morning, and their job provides the sense-of-purpose they require.

So, to the OP's question, I agree with others... once you know the finances will work, it becomes a pretty simple decision process: What do you plan to do after retirement? Is your job preventing those things? Which is more important to your overall happiness, sense-of-purpose, and identity? If you are happy with the current situation, why change? Don't retire simply because you can. It should be because the next chapter is more compelling than the current one.

Anyway, those are the thoughts going through my head when I pulled the trigger.
__________________
Retired at 52 in July 2013. On to better things...
AA: 55% stock, 15% real estate, 27% bonds, 3% cash
WR: 2.0% SI: 2 pensions, some rental income, SS later
Cobra9777 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2014, 05:05 PM   #33
Recycles dryer sheets
pletal's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Tampa
Posts: 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Senator View Post
Thank you for all of the responses.

I have been on the go for the past several years. I have been a landlord since 2000, but in 2008, I started buying additional properties. I was looking in 2006 - 2007, but no properties were cash flowing enough. In 2007 that changed.

So I purchased five 4-plexes, one each year. All were foreclosures. Most were purchased with creative buying strategies so I got excellent deals, buying for fifty cents on the dollar. I did a complete remodel on the unitsí one at a time. New kitchens, bathrooms, remove walls, etc. I poured a lot of money back into them. Now that I am slowing down on the remodels, I realize that I have quite a bit of cash flow and profit. Thatís especially true when I start to look at my taxes that I will have to pay this April.

So the concept of FI is still new to me. Slowing getting my head around the idea of being able to retire, but thatís another obstacle. In my head, retirement is for Ďoldí people, not people like myself. I would still continue to do the property thing, but at my own pace. Not working every minute of the days that I have off, and taking vacations to work on the properties. I may even start a new type of venture, some ideas I have had in my head for a while. So I will still be busy, and working, just not for a company.

I also grew up relatively poor, with a single mother, and we had a Coleman cooler we used for a cheap refrigerator. It was small, but it worked. So, I know I want to make sure of what I have, and not quit just before the finish line.

I also just got the 10% disability rating from my time in the service, back in 1978-82. That capped one of my large expenses, health care. If the VA care isn't what itís cracked up to be, I can just purchase a policy without worries about pre-existing conditions. I donít have any now, but every day is different. I am healthy, but not as solid as I used to be.

Anyway, I have been scouring many retirement websites and looking for ideas to give more confidence. Intuitively I know I could do it, but feel like I am on the high-dive looking over the edge.
I think I know where you are. Growing up poor, you may be trying to get as much space as you can between being poor and doing well. I am having the same issues. Have saved and have rental properties. We have saved and have over 4 million saved. Still working like a fool. Courage may be the thing I am lacking. No debt, no mortgage. Hard to change habits after 30 years. Have a great paying job, making 400 plus, . The future is scary, if you are like me, I don't feel like I deserve to retire early. Looking over the edge with you. All the advice you get will mean nothing until you can wrap your head around it. Mentally getting ready for the next stage in life is something I am also struggling with. Don't know if I'm ready to just " watch the wheels go round" (good luck, and congratulations for setting yourself up with many options)
__________________
pletal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2014, 05:12 PM   #34
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Senator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Eagan, MN
Posts: 3,045
Thanks for all of the encouragement and advice!
__________________
Senator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2014, 05:57 PM   #35
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Midpack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 11,968
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ready View Post
What I don't get much of a sense of from your post is whether you are enjoying your job, think it's just OK, or can't stand it. If you still enjoy it, I don't see any reason to leave. If it's wearing on you, I think you already know that you have enough to call it quits.
Quote:
Originally Posted by brewer12345 View Post
Do you hate your job or your workload? For me it was a case of get busy living or get busy dying. I was in a dull, astonishingly bureaucratic job with no upside. Tomorrow is promised to no man.
I still haven't seen the OP's answer to this.

Everyone should work toward FI, but reaching FI is not in itself a reason to retire, early or otherwise. If you still enjoy your work, or don't have something better to do with your time, it could be a mistake to retire. Some naturally flourish, some find themselves bored (even depressed) and returning to work can be difficult.

'It's not enough to retire from something, you need to have something to retire to also...'
__________________
No one agrees with other people's opinions; they merely agree with their own opinions -- expressed by somebody else. Sydney Tremayne
Retired Jun 2011 at age 57

Target AA: 60% equity funds / 35% bond funds / 5% cash
Target WR: Approx 2.5% Approx 20% SI (secure income, SS only)
Midpack is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2014, 06:01 PM   #36
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Ready's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Southern California
Posts: 1,823
Quote:
Originally Posted by Midpack View Post
'It's not enough to retire from something, you need to have something to retire to also...'
I remember seeing this comment in several posts when I was contemplating retiring from my position last year. It always concerned me because I can't say that I had anything specific that I was "retiring to", other than a lot of leisure time. I guess some people don't do well with too much unstructured leisure time, but I find myself as busy as I want to be and never wishing I had more to do. Yet if I had to answer the question "What did I retire to?", I wouldn't have a clue how to respond.
__________________
Ready is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2014, 06:02 PM   #37
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
steelyman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Triangle
Posts: 3,218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Midpack View Post
I still haven't seen the OP's answer to this.

Everyone should work toward FI, but reaching FI is not in itself a reason to retire, early or otherwise. If you still enjoy your work, or don't have something better to do with your time, it could be a mistake to retire. Some naturally flourish, some find themselves bored (even depressed) and returning to work can be difficult.

'It's not enough to retire from something, you need to have something to retire to also...'
Will you be going back?
__________________

steelyman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2014, 06:31 PM   #38
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
brewer12345's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 16,391
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ready View Post
I remember seeing this comment in several posts when I was contemplating retiring from my position last year. It always concerned me because I can't say that I had anything specific that I was "retiring to", other than a lot of leisure time. I guess some people don't do well with too much unstructured leisure time, but I find myself as busy as I want to be and never wishing I had more to do. Yet if I had to answer the question "What did I retire to?", I wouldn't have a clue how to respond.
People keep asking me what I will do next and I don't really have an answer. Didn't really retire to anything in particular except getting to recover and figure out what I want out of life at this stage of things. Admittedly I am grappling with some confusing stuff as I make the transition, but I am not about to willingly go back to the cube.
__________________
"There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest have to pee on the electric fence for themselves."



- Will Rogers
brewer12345 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2014, 06:36 PM   #39
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Largo
Posts: 1,945
Quote:
Originally Posted by Senator View Post

I also just got the 10% disability rating from my time in the service, back in 1978-82. That capped one of my large expenses, health care. If the VA care isn't what itís cracked up to be, I can just purchase a policy without worries about pre-existing conditions. I donít have any now, but every day is different. I am healthy, but not as solid as I used to be.

Anyway, I have been scouring many retirement websites and looking for ideas to give more confidence. Intuitively I know I could do it, but feel like I am on the high-dive looking over the edge.
The 10% disability rating currently gives you Priority 3 access to the VA but be very careful because if you get seriously injured away from a VA hospital you could rack up $100,000 in medical bills that would be your responsibility before you could get transferred to a VA facility. I am eligible for VA but I have always purchased individual high deductible health insurance because of the issue with emergency care.
__________________
Buckeye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2014, 06:55 PM   #40
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Largo
Posts: 1,945
Quote:
Originally Posted by brewer12345 View Post
People keep asking me what I will do next and I don't really have an answer. Didn't really retire to anything in particular except getting to recover and figure out what I want out of life at this stage of things. Admittedly I am grappling with some confusing stuff as I make the transition, but I am not about to willingly go back to the cube.
I can't say I was retiring to anything in particular at 52 but I knew I had to get away from the fools. I decided no idiot was ever going to control my day again. I was on the edge of being FI but that was close enough for me. Life is too short. DH and I both grew up poor so we knew we could make it no matter what. We had 'been there, done that.' If Obamacare had been available back then, it would have been a slam dunk.

I am writing this on a Sunday night and I don't have Sunday-itis. Monday? Only another day of the week!
__________________

__________________
Buckeye is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Trying to get the courage......... Rena Hi, I am... 10 09-11-2013 04:42 AM
Big-Name Investors Get Long, Get Loud and Get Richer timo2 Stock Picking and Market Strategy 2 08-16-2013 09:02 AM
Have the courage to do nothing! Trek Other topics 4 12-11-2007 12:58 PM
Need courage piano88 Hi, I am... 11 12-01-2005 06:27 PM
Courage... Brat Other topics 13 03-04-2005 09:37 AM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:08 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.