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Old 12-05-2018, 03:11 PM   #121
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Mr. Pal and I live in Manhattan (not Kansas!) We spent an average of $1114/month this year for groceries and eating out combined. Our budget is $1200 but I am trying to undercut that. I used to be able to feed us more cheaply but I am now not allowed much fiber so the bean soups I used to make using dried beans, celery, and a few veggies, and actually really like, are out. replaced by sandwiches with deli chicken and turkey, sometimes ham. I figure if I can stay out of the hospital by avoiding the fiber we will make up for the difference in the food cost.
I am super impressed by some of you folks' low food bills!
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Old 12-05-2018, 03:14 PM   #122
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... If you eat organic, would you still be doing so if you were still saving for retirement?
When I was working I had no choice, I ate whatever was being served in the galley.

Nowadays, most of our friends are small-scale 'market-farmers', and most of them are Certified Organic.

If you tell them what you want grown, they will plant an acre for you. I provide farm produce to a Buyers Club, many of the members want specific crops, so our farmers will take orders in February of what the members want.

My wife barters a lot for our food. She trades our honey, whiskey, apples or pork for veggies.
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Old 12-05-2018, 03:45 PM   #123
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I see so many of you eat organic. I find that interesting. Not because it's more expensive and most on here are so frugal, it's because most people I know do not. And most people I know are not well off.

If you eat organic, would you still be doing so if you were still saving for retirement?

I bought more organic when we were saving for retirement, less now because I'm trying to spend less to stay under the ACA income limits. I still buy organic when there is a reasonable price difference with conventional, but usually not at 4 times the price. At minimum I usually buy organic versions of eggs, beef, carrots and apples.
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Old 12-05-2018, 05:26 PM   #124
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I see so many of you eat organic. I find that interesting. Not because it's more expensive and most on here are so frugal, it's because most people I know do not. And most people I know are not well off.

If you eat organic, would you still be doing so if you were still saving for retirement?

I'm not sure how you could read this thread and think that most here are frugal.


We try to buy some organic but more importantly we stay away from the chemical laden foods.


We are saving for retirement.
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Old 12-05-2018, 06:54 PM   #125
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Because the local Whole Foods clone is close by, I will buy their produce when it makes reasonable sense to do so. The organic leaf lettuce, which is usually very fresh, is the same price as Safeway's regular lettuce, which is a few days old when it hits the store. Potatoes are a little pricier than Sprouts regular potatoes, but Sprouts is 10 plus miles away, or $3.00 more in gas. The green beans are pricey, but the quantities are small and the quality is good. More stable produce is purchased at Sprouts in major shopping trips. So, yes, I think that's a relatively frugal approach to vegetable purchases.
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Old 12-06-2018, 10:09 AM   #126
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Couple hundo a month for two, but I'm a good deal shopper and there's plenty of them here. Couponmom.com is my friend.
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Old 12-06-2018, 10:49 AM   #127
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I'm not sure how you could read this thread and think that most here are frugal.


We try to buy some organic but more importantly we stay away from the chemical laden foods.


We are saving for retirement.
Haha! Good point, but I guess I was thinking of other threads like "Cutting the Cable" where members go to great lengths to save $100 a month on cable (pretty frugal!) but don't bat an eye to spend $1000 a month on food. Not judging at all, I just find it interesting.
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Old 12-06-2018, 01:52 PM   #128
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We spend $600/month on Groceries and $600 on dining. We are just two and don't have specific budget for these two item, we buy what we feel like and dine whenever we want to.
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Old 12-07-2018, 03:24 PM   #129
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For those who enjoy Quest bars, Target carries 4-packs for $7.50 in So CA. Pretty good deal but limited flavor selection. I recently ordered Quest cookies. Thought they were just OK until I heated one up. YUM! Chocolate chip is my favorite but peanut butter and gingerbread are not bad. They are a lot of calories (250) but good for a meal replacement, and pretty filling.
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Old 12-07-2018, 03:25 PM   #130
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Haha! Good point, but I guess I was thinking of other threads like "Cutting the Cable" where members go to great lengths to save $100 a month on cable (pretty frugal!) but don't bat an eye to spend $1000 a month on food. Not judging at all, I just find it interesting.


Itís all about priorities. I could totally cut off TV and not miss it, but canít say the same about Ahi Poke from Gelsonís or center cut filet mignon from Trader Joeís.
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Old 12-07-2018, 07:40 PM   #131
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For those who enjoy Quest bars, Target carries 4-packs for $7.50 in So CA. Pretty good deal but limited flavor selection. I recently ordered Quest cookies. Thought they were just OK until I heated one up. YUM! Chocolate chip is my favorite but peanut butter and gingerbread are not bad. They are a lot of calories (250) but good for a meal replacement, and pretty filling.
Hmm, if they're that good I probably shouldn't have them around. Too easy to indulge in one (or more) as a snack.
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Old 12-07-2018, 08:19 PM   #132
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Amazon charges an arm and a leg for Quest bars but I order a box of them every month or two anyway.
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For those who enjoy Quest bars, Target carries 4-packs for $7.50 in So CA. Pretty good deal but limited flavor selection. I recently ordered Quest cookies. Thought they were just OK until I heated one up. YUM! Chocolate chip is my favorite but peanut butter and gingerbread are not bad. They are a lot of calories (250) but good for a meal replacement, and pretty filling.
I just noticed that right now you can now get 12 of the mint chocolate chunk Quest protein bars on Amazon for $15.89. They used to be $20.99 IIRC. I don't need any more right now, oh well!
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Old 12-07-2018, 09:22 PM   #133
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Haha! Good point, but I guess I was thinking of other threads like "Cutting the Cable" where members go to great lengths to save $100 a month on cable (pretty frugal!) but don't bat an eye to spend $1000 a month on food. Not judging at all, I just find it interesting.
It's all about priorities. Once you have enough income in retirement, you decide what you want to spend your money on, and what you don't want your spend your money on.

For us paying up for really good quality groceries is a priority directly contributing to our daily quality of life. In addition to shopping for the best produce/seafood/meat/wine locally, we order some great stuff online - some of that can be pricey.

TV content is a different ballgame. You don't have to pay much for some of the best content. And a lot of cable is crap. So finding a cheaper way makes a lot of sense. And you can be flexible and subscribe month-to-month for certain premium content when there is a series worth watching.

Yes, we pay way more for monthly food than TV content, because the TV content is much cheaper.
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Old 12-07-2018, 09:25 PM   #134
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Itís all about priorities. I could totally cut off TV and not miss it, but canít say the same about Ahi Poke from Gelsonís or center cut filet mignon from Trader Joeís.
Exactly!

I want my occasionally King Crab* and a very nice white or sparkling wine to go along with it!

* A heck of a lot cheaper at home than in a restaurant!!!
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Old 12-07-2018, 10:13 PM   #135
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Family of seven. Three are currently at college, but I tracked expenses pretty closely both before and during the time they have been at college.

We have averaged about $1100/month for groceries (food only) and dining out. Typically, it has been about $800 for the groceries and $300 on dining out. Dining out includes if they buy lunch at school, any "date nights", etc etc.
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Old 12-08-2018, 05:29 AM   #136
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If you eat organic, would you still be doing so if you were still saving for retirement?
Yes. I am not sure why one wouldn't be, given that one is working while saving for retirement and (might) have more disposable income.
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Old 12-08-2018, 09:44 AM   #137
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I see these numbers and now have confirmation that living in Florida is NOT cheap anymore ! We spend $600 / month on food (very rarely eat out) for 2 and I shop sales like a madwoman. Imagine if I didn't ! Beer and wine is NOT included in that number. That comes out of our individual monthly "allowance" and is not tracked in detail.
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Old 12-08-2018, 01:34 PM   #138
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I see these numbers and now have confirmation that living in Florida is NOT cheap anymore ! We spend $600 / month on food (very rarely eat out) for 2 and I shop sales like a madwoman. Imagine if I didn't ! Beer and wine is NOT included in that number. That comes out of our individual monthly "allowance" and is not tracked in detail.
Our groceries are high here in New Orleans, too, and I don't know why.

I have been ordering what I can online, and that seems to help to some extent. The prices are lower, and I don't buy as many impulse items.
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Old 12-11-2018, 05:56 PM   #139
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DP and I average $390/month on groceries, cleaning supplies, etc., $65 on wine and beer, and $160 on restaurants. We buy organic meat and produce when it makes sense, and do not buy much prepared foods.
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Old 12-11-2018, 06:17 PM   #140
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I budget $600 (includes toiletries and alcohol and cleaning supplies, etc.), but we probably go a little over that and we are just 2 people. Then again I like to stock up on stuff. And we never eat out, except a couple of times on vacation and for the XMAS holiday. Maybe a rare Chinese take out.



But now that we are down to one paycheck, I have been cutting back a bit.
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