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Old 02-10-2015, 08:10 AM   #41
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rodi and MichaelB you made me laugh! Just what I was thinking on both counts!
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Old 02-10-2015, 08:46 AM   #42
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Part of my ER plan was to set up a monthly dividend income stream from a bond fund I would invest the proceeds of sale of my company stock when I left the company back in 2008. Back then, I owned fewer shares than now but they paid more dividends per share than they do now. For a while those 2 items working in opposite directions pretty much canceled each other out but now the slowly declining DPS has dominated more. I have since supplemented my monthly income stream with the quarterly dividends coming from a stock fund (taken as cash instead of reinvesting), something I had always considered when I set up my ER plan.


I recall initially it took a little getting used to just to have a monthly income stream instead of a biweekly paycheck, but I quickly got over that by doing a little more planning. I had been working part-time before tat, so it wasn't a really big deal to do some extra planning, especially when it came to the larger, "lumpier" expenses I had to make sure I built up surpluses in advance to cover.
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Retired in late 2008 at age 45. Cashed in company stock, bought a lot of shares in a big bond fund and am living nicely off its dividends. IRA, SS, and a pension await me at age 60 and later. No kids, no debts.

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Old 02-10-2015, 08:47 AM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
women want security , I know that because when I approach women in clubs they usually call out security ,security, ha ha ha
I just had to quote this because it literally made me laugh out loud!!!


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Originally Posted by pb4uski View Post
While it may be a stereotype, it is also probably true more often than not ... the men are the ones who manage the investing and I think mathjak is wise to consider his wife's inclinations in his planning. I'm guessing that if one did a poll of forum members that a high percentage of married households would have the man managing the investing and the woman disinterested - of course there will be some exceptions... but I'm guessing 75/25 or more.
I agree, it is a stereotype, but yes it appears it is true more often than not. I can admit to that as a woman, BUT, I stand proud that I am the investor/financial kingpin in this household! And I feel a special kinship to the women on this board as it obviously appears we are in the minority and are a unique breed.

However, in our household it isn't that my husband isn't interested nor financially inclined - quite the opposite. He is extremely good at understanding the complex topics that come up on this board. He is an engineer and has a very strong mathematical background. He is a fantastic sounding board for me - we often discuss topics, and I find his input invaluable. Many times he is able to help me with something I am having difficulty understanding. I do not make big decisions without his added analysis and input. Our financial decisions are all made together.

However, I am the detail-oriented one, the researcher, kind of like a pitbull once I set my mind to learning something...I am extremely tenacious. This makes me the strong one when it comes to laying out a plan and monitoring it - so I am the one best inclined to steer our financial ship.
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(49, married; DH 53. I am fully retired as of 2015 (well ok, I still work part-time but only because I love the job and have complete freedom to call off if I want to travel with hubby for work), DH hopes to fully retire 2018 when he turns 55 to access 401K penalty-free...although he may decide to do part-time consulting)
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Old 02-10-2015, 09:41 AM   #44
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Statistically, there are differences in the investing styles of men and women. I have read that women are less likely to make risky decisions. Different priorities does not mean better or worse.

My (now deceased) parents did not fit this gender stereotype. They kept joint accounts for household expenses (which my mother managed), but also had their own investments. My never ventured beyond bonds despite the fact that he had a DB pension. My mother maintained a large equity portfolio and watched the markets daily.
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Old 02-10-2015, 10:23 AM   #45
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My mother maintained a large equity portfolio and watched the markets daily.

What a great role model for you!

My parents were quite poor and never knew anything about investing. But I learned a lot about budgeting and living on a tight budget from them - my mother was so good at stretching every penny!
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(49, married; DH 53. I am fully retired as of 2015 (well ok, I still work part-time but only because I love the job and have complete freedom to call off if I want to travel with hubby for work), DH hopes to fully retire 2018 when he turns 55 to access 401K penalty-free...although he may decide to do part-time consulting)
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Old 02-10-2015, 11:54 AM   #46
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$60,000 a year spending is modest? Really

If so, my spending isn't modest but I am a miser. Just went through 2014 expenses recently and my wife and I spent $47,000 last year not including taxes. We purchased some toys for ourselves so our spending was up. Most years it is less than $47,000.

Looks like I am running with the wrong crowd here.
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Old 02-10-2015, 12:38 PM   #47
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I spent CDN$47,000 last year not including taxes. I took 5 trips, including a month in Europe. I am single. 2013 expenditures were almost identical. My budget was $55,000.
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Old 02-10-2015, 07:00 PM   #48
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My wife and I have been keeping tract of our annual expenses for the last 2 years as we prepare for the big change. Totals came in at $26,000 2 yrs ago and $28,000 last year. No debt helps keep them down, along with no major purchases other than a 2 week trip last year.
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Old 02-11-2015, 04:24 AM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simple girl View Post
I just had to quote this because it literally made me laugh out loud!!!




I agree, it is a stereotype, but yes it appears it is true more often than not. I can admit to that as a woman, BUT, I stand proud that I am the investor/financial kingpin in this household! And I feel a special kinship to the women on this board as it obviously appears we are in the minority and are a unique breed.

However, in our household it isn't that my husband isn't interested nor financially inclined - quite the opposite. He is extremely good at understanding the complex topics that come up on this board. He is an engineer and has a very strong mathematical background. He is a fantastic sounding board for me - we often discuss topics, and I find his input invaluable. Many times he is able to help me with something I am having difficulty understanding. I do not make big decisions without his added analysis and input. Our financial decisions are all made together.

However, I am the detail-oriented one, the researcher, kind of like a pitbull once I set my mind to learning something...I am extremely tenacious. This makes me the strong one when it comes to laying out a plan and monitoring it - so I am the one best inclined to steer our financial ship.

don't forget the women here or the women you see on most forums are here in this section because they do take an interest and do understand investing.

many many women do not and leave it to their husbands to set the path.

only until it is dropped in their lap they have little clue as to what they even have . odds are they will not like the volatility either now that they have to deal with it.


more and more i am seeing more planners have different strategys for men and women who have different goals.

the fact that women can live longer , die alone and tend to shun volatility more than most men can make for some difficult creative planning.

most women are more concerned wiith out living their money and or growing poorer as opposed to growing richer and beating indexes . there ar3e exceptions to exeything but odds are this is how it mostly plays out.
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Old 02-11-2015, 07:29 AM   #50
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don't forget the women here or the women you see on most forums are here in this section because they do take an interest and do understand investing.

many many women do not and leave it to their husbands to set the path.

only until it is dropped in their lap they have little clue as to what they even have . odds are they will not like the volatility either now that they have to deal with it.
I agree this is all very true and realize the women on this board appear to be the exception, not the rule. I don't have any friends who have any interest in learning about investing. And my mother-in-law was left in the same position when her husband died - she made some poor financial decisions, then contacted us AFTER the fact.
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(49, married; DH 53. I am fully retired as of 2015 (well ok, I still work part-time but only because I love the job and have complete freedom to call off if I want to travel with hubby for work), DH hopes to fully retire 2018 when he turns 55 to access 401K penalty-free...although he may decide to do part-time consulting)
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