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Old 10-10-2017, 04:59 PM   #61
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it depends at what age her own fra is . but as an example if it is 66 then at 62 she will get 1/2 your full amount, not 70 amount , less 30%

https://www.ssa.gov/OACT/quickcalc/earlyretire.html
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Old 10-10-2017, 05:01 PM   #62
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Originally Posted by pb4uski View Post
She will get SS based on her work record plus the excess of 1/2 of your SS at your FRA over her SS at her FRA. If she takes at 62 the part based on her work record will be discounted because she is taking SS before her FRA.

Check out SS Analyze.
he stated she does not have enough of a work history for her own
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Old 10-10-2017, 05:03 PM   #63
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good point... I missed that.
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Old 10-10-2017, 06:51 PM   #64
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Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
it depends at what age her own fra is . but as an example if it is 66 then at 62 she will get 1/2 your full amount, not 70 amount , less 30%

https://www.ssa.gov/OACT/quickcalc/earlyretire.html
So if i delay til 70 (she would be 62) then should she wait to collect hers until FRA (67) if we are looking to increase the total SS amount?

I entered data into bedrock capital SSanalyze and got the following:
Recommended Solution


Based on the data above, the following plan of action is recommended:


  1. I will file for my benefit to start on 1/1/2039, the month after I turn 70 and receive 124% of my full retirement age benefit. (WIFE) will file for her spousal benefit to start on 2/1/2042, when she is 66 and receive 45.83% of my full retirement age benefit.
  2. After she is widowed, she will receive her survivor's benefit which will be 124% of my full retirement age benefit.
Sound right? Thanks, I appreciate the help (I know I have a ways to go but never too early to plan ahead)
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Old 10-10-2017, 09:05 PM   #65
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That sounds sensible.
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Old 10-11-2017, 07:29 AM   #66
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Originally Posted by sjwil1 View Post
So if i delay til 70 (she would be 62) then should she wait to collect hers until FRA (67) if we are looking to increase the total SS amount?

I entered data into bedrock capital SSanalyze and got the following:
Recommended Solution


Based on the data above, the following plan of action is recommended:


  1. I will file for my benefit to start on 1/1/2039, the month after I turn 70 and receive 124% of my full retirement age benefit. (WIFE) will file for her spousal benefit to start on 2/1/2042, when she is 66 and receive 45.83% of my full retirement age benefit.
  2. After she is widowed, she will receive her survivor's benefit which will be 124% of my full retirement age benefit.
Sound right? Thanks, I appreciate the help (I know I have a ways to go but never too early to plan ahead)
AFAIK, your wife's survivor benefit would be 100% of your full retirement age benefit, as she would not get any benefit for the additional years you deferred.
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Old 10-11-2017, 08:40 AM   #67
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AFAIK, your wife's survivor benefit would be 100% of your full retirement age benefit, as she would not get any benefit for the additional years you deferred.
We've been through this discussion before! I don't know how to copy and paste this so that it looks correct, but MichaelB had a post a few months ago:

Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelB View Post
This should clear things up. From the SSA https://www.ssa.gov/OP_Home/cfr20/404/404-0313.htm Learn something new every day.
Quote:
(e) What is the effect of my delayed retirement credits on the benefit amount of others entitled on my earnings record?ó(1) Surviving spouse or surviving divorced spouse. If you earn delayed retirement credits during your lifetime, we will compute benefits for your surviving spouse or surviving divorced spouse based on your regular primary insurance amount plus the amount of those delayed retirement credits. All delayed retirement credits, including any earned during the year of death, can be used in computing the benefit amount for your surviving spouse or surviving divorced spouse beginning with the month of your death. We compute delayed retirement credits up to but not including the month of death.
If you click the little box to the right of MichaelB in the first quote, it will lead you to the thread where this was discussed.

This should almost be part of a Social Security FAQ for this group.
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Old 10-11-2017, 09:18 AM   #68
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I understand that if my wife takes SS at 62 she will get about 30% of my FRA (50% -20% early retirement cut). but how do they determine my FRA amount? I may still be working which would drive my benefit at FRA up. Does my wife's benefit go up every month as my FRA benefit goes up? or what?
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Old 10-11-2017, 09:20 AM   #69
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Originally Posted by DFW_M5 View Post
AFAIK, your wife's survivor benefit would be 100% of your full retirement age benefit, as she would not get any benefit for the additional years you deferred.
Nope, she would get the benefit of the delay to age 70,

This is one of the most important financial things a high earner in a marriage can do for their spouse (of either sex).
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Old 10-11-2017, 09:39 AM   #70
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Originally Posted by Clone View Post
We've been through this discussion before! I don't know how to copy and paste this so that it looks correct, but MichaelB had a post a few months ago:





If you click the little box to the right of MichaelB in the first quote, it will lead you to the thread where this was discussed.

This should almost be part of a Social Security FAQ for this group.
+1
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Old 10-11-2017, 10:22 AM   #71
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Nope, she would get the benefit of the delay to age 70,

This is one of the most important financial things a high earner in a marriage can do for their spouse (of either sex).
+1
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Old 10-11-2017, 12:33 PM   #72
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sjwil1 View Post
So if i delay til 70 (she would be 62) then should she wait to collect hers until FRA (67) if we are looking to increase the total SS amount?

I entered data into bedrock capital SSanalyze and got the following:
Recommended Solution


Based on the data above, the following plan of action is recommended:


  1. I will file for my benefit to start on 1/1/2039, the month after I turn 70 and receive 124% of my full retirement age benefit. (WIFE) will file for her spousal benefit to start on 2/1/2042, when she is 66 and receive 45.83% of my full retirement age benefit.
  2. After she is widowed, she will receive her survivor's benefit which will be 124% of my full retirement age benefit.
Sound right? Thanks, I appreciate the help (I know I have a ways to go but never too early to plan ahead)
I don't understand why she wouldn't wait until she is 67 in 2043 and will receive 50% of your FRA benefit.

At what ages are you assuming each of you die?
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Old 10-12-2017, 06:41 AM   #73
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Nope, she would get the benefit of the delay to age 70,

This is one of the most important financial things a high earner in a marriage can do for their spouse (of either sex).
Thanks, that is something I am delighted to hear as it will help my spouse.
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Old 10-12-2017, 08:12 AM   #74
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Sometimes it is a mental challenge. If I defer filing until 70 to add potential protection to DW (who is 5.2 years older and has some health issues) I am also potentially providing the same added benefit to my ex, who would likely live longer. She did absolutely nothing to deserve that benefit (in fact, I filed at 9 years of marriage, though we were already separated for almost 2, and her lawyer kept postponing until the 10 year mark had passed. My suckful attorney said it was no skin off my bottom line (which it isn’t) and delayed me paying her anything (which it did) so don’t worry about it) and it really grates me that she gets a benefit due to the work income I made for 25 years after the divorce.
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Old 10-12-2017, 08:42 AM   #75
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Sometimes it is a mental challenge. If I defer filing until 70 to add potential protection to DW (who is 5.2 years older and has some health issues) I am also potentially providing the same added benefit to my ex, who would likely live longer. She did absolutely nothing to deserve that benefit (in fact, I filed at 9 years of marriage, though we were already separated for almost 2, and her lawyer kept postponing until the 10 year mark had passed. My suckful attorney said it was no skin off my bottom line (which it isnít) and delayed me paying her anything (which it did) so donít worry about it) and it really grates me that she gets a benefit due to the work income I made for 25 years after the divorce.
I'd put that totally out of mind and not make potentially the wrong decision out of spite. Whatever you do should be based on your and DW's situation. Don't let the ex- get one last shot in by letting how it affects her influence your decision in any way.
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