Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 05-10-2011, 11:06 AM   #41
Dryer sheet aficionado
Pete44's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Phuket
Posts: 37
Redefining myself hasn't been difficult after selling the house and moving to Thailand. Remembering what day of the week it is, has been a challenge. Finishing the second novel continues at a snail's pace. The 24 year old girlfriend always needs attention.

I can't complain but sometimes I still do.
__________________

__________________
Author of The Essential Thailand Retirement Guide
Pete44 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 05-10-2011, 11:13 AM   #42
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
haha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Hooverville
Posts: 22,384
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete44 View Post
Redefining myself hasn't been difficult after selling the house and moving to Thailand. Remembering what day of the week it is, has been a challenge. Finishing the second novel continues at a snail's pace. The 24 year old girlfriend always needs attention.

I can't complain but sometimes I still do.
Mercy! Please tell us more.

Ha
__________________

__________________
"As a general rule, the more dangerous or inappropriate a conversation, the more interesting it is."-Scott Adams
haha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2011, 11:14 AM   #43
Dryer sheet aficionado
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 27
Yes please! We are not worthy!
__________________
Jamtin34 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2011, 12:45 PM   #44
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 5,072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete44 View Post
Redefining myself hasn't been difficult after selling the house and moving to Thailand. Remembering what day of the week it is, has been a challenge. Finishing the second novel continues at a snail's pace. The 24 year old girlfriend always needs attention.

I can't complain but sometimes I still do.
Livin' the dream huh!

Yes, let us live vicariously through your monologue!
__________________
chinaco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2011, 01:27 PM   #45
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Alberta/Ontario/ Arizona
Posts: 3,139
Interesting discussion. I have been retired for close to 5 years and enjoy it a lot. However, I certainly had a period of adjustment similar to that described above(I have not read the book). both DW and daughter had a tough time with me for 2-3 years. They say things are much better now. This was difficult for me to self diagnose. My career was high powered, highly paid, and bestowed significant power and prestige. I would be superhuman not to miss some of these perks. Obviously my experience would not be the norm.

At the end of my career I was tired of it all(I thought) and despetately wanted to retire which I did at 56. At my level in the organization this was never a unilateral decision. So, I can understand the book's findings. This is not the majority view here or in many places probably as many people dislike (hate?) their jobs or work environment.

Advice I would give based on my experience: If you enjoy your work and are reasonably well paid, keep working until you don't.
__________________
Danmar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2011, 01:40 PM   #46
Recycles dryer sheets
Retch The Grate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Mountain View
Posts: 252
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete44 View Post
Redefining myself hasn't been difficult after selling the house and moving to Thailand. Remembering what day of the week it is, has been a challenge. Finishing the second novel continues at a snail's pace. The 24 year old girlfriend always needs attention.
Where in Thailand do you live? My uncle lives in Phu Noi, south of Hua Hin, and we've got family friends in Bangkok. After visiting Thailand one of my semi-retirement ideas is starting a game development studio on a beach there. Much lower amount of money coming in needed to fund that lifestyle than living here in California.
__________________
Retch The Grate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2011, 02:06 PM   #47
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Thousand Oaks
Posts: 838
Quote:
Originally Posted by Retch The Grate View Post
Where in Thailand do you live? My uncle lives in Phu Noi, south of Hua Hin, and we've got family friends in Bangkok. After visiting Thailand one of my semi-retirement ideas is starting a game development studio on a beach there. Much lower amount of money coming in needed to fund that lifestyle than living here in California.
Sign me up as coder #2 ..
__________________
mh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2011, 02:24 PM   #48
Moderator Emeritus
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 11,043
If transitioning to retirement is a problem now, will it get any easier after working a few more years? It seems to me that, the longer you work, the more you identify with your job and the less you have time to build a strong social network outside of work. Hence working longer could make the transition to retirement that much more painful. Perhaps it is why early retirees on this forum don't identify strongly with the subjects in the study.
__________________
FIREd is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2011, 04:22 PM   #49
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 702
I am still working part time mainly because of the group health insurance. About 5 years ago I cut back to 30 hours/week. Two years ago I cut back to just under 20 hours/week.

I don't know how I ever had time to work 30 or 40 hours each week. I am starting to think about cutting back further, however, I doubt they would pay for my health insurance at that point.

I am a computer programmer and I do like the mental challenge that the job provides.
__________________
FreeAtLast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2011, 04:24 PM   #50
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Southern California
Posts: 916
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete44 View Post
The 24 year old girlfriend always needs attention.

I can't complain but sometimes I still do.
This is kind of the norm in various asian countries.

When I was in the Philippines for a few weeks last year staying in a condotel (furnished condo rented like a hotel), it was very common to meet males between age 45 – 70 having drinks in the bar with very attractive females age 18 – 28. The benefit of the Philippines is English is a primary language. A few were very open about how far their monthly SS check of $1200 - $1600 can go.

One bedroom units were going for about $20 a day, but monthly rates were available for cheap. One guy retired at 38 with less than 1M, living there full time…. Activities = golfing, drinking, dancing, swimming, girls, massages, etc. not always in that order. He will never work again. It was an interesting beer as he thought I should get a divorce and follow his foot steps.

For the record, I needed a 3 bedroom unit as we were visiting with a large party but due to jet lag I didn't sleep much for the time I was there.
__________________
Aiming_4_55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2011, 04:26 PM   #51
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Southern California
Posts: 916
BTW - If one enjoys their job and have no outside demands on their time which is more enjoyable, Congrats on finding that dream. For me, I have many outside interests were my job is only providing $$ and medical benefits for the time being.
__________________
Aiming_4_55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2011, 05:07 PM   #52
Full time employment: Posting here.
urn2bfree's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 711
Regarding this business about "doing nothing" the Italians have a wonderful phrase:
LA DOLCE FARNIENTE =
the sweetness of doing nothing

I look forward to that sweetness --someday.
__________________
urn2bfree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2011, 05:18 PM   #53
Moderator Emeritus
Nords's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Oahu
Posts: 26,617
Quote:
Originally Posted by FD View Post
If transitioning to retirement is a problem now, will it get any easier after working a few more years? It seems to me that, the longer you work, the more you identify with your job and the less you have time to build a strong social network outside of work. Hence working longer could make the transition to retirement that much more painful. Perhaps it is why early retirees on this forum don't identify strongly with the subjects in the study.
"Just one more year"...
__________________
*
*

The book written on E-R.org, "The Military Guide to Financial Independence and Retirement", on sale now! For more info see "About Me" in my profile.
I don't spend much time here anymore, so please send me a PM. Thanks.
Nords is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2011, 05:31 PM   #54
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Southern California
Posts: 916
Quote:
Originally Posted by FD View Post
If transitioning to retirement is a problem now, will it get any easier after working a few more years? It seems to me that, the longer you work, the more you identify with your job and the less you have time to build a strong social network outside of work. Hence working longer could make the transition to retirement that much more painful. Perhaps it is why early retirees on this forum don't identify strongly with the subjects in the study.
Sure with poorer health/stress do to megacrap.
__________________
Aiming_4_55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2011, 08:23 PM   #55
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
martyb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Bossier City
Posts: 2,182
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamtin34 View Post
Fabulous perspective!

Q: What do you do?
A: Nothing

I live for this moment

+1
__________________
martyb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2011, 01:22 AM   #56
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Alberta/Ontario/ Arizona
Posts: 3,139
Quote:
Originally Posted by FD View Post
If transitioning to retirement is a problem now, will it get any easier after working a few more years? It seems to me that, the longer you work, the more you identify with your job and the less you have time to build a strong social network outside of work. Hence working longer could make the transition to retirement that much more painful. Perhaps it is why early retirees on this forum don't identify strongly with the subjects in the study.
I'm not sure it would get easier. In my case (not typical I know) I think I have some regrets about not sticking it out longer and making a greater success of my career. Perhaps getting to the next level was in reach if I had tried harder and enjoyed it more. This isn't a big deal to me but does cross my mind sometimes. I suspect most people here would think I'm nuts.
__________________
Danmar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2011, 01:36 AM   #57
Full time employment: Posting here.
old woman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 551
I didn't retire yet at 63, got a 8% raise this week so now making even more money. I was already saving a major amount of money. I have surpassed my goals for retirement savings but am not thinking so much about retiring.

Two years to Medicare so that is about my minimum. Giving up 60K or so a year to stay home doesn't sound like much fun. First my boyfriend will start asking what I did all day if I don't do cooking and cleaning. I am not motivated without deadlines so knowing how I was as a housewife I can see my days as drinking coffee until afternoon, then a nap or read a book.

I like work because I have to get up, shower and dressed in the car and on the road. The work is easy and the boss appreciates me.

I will wait until I really want to move farther from work so the commute is bad. Then spend the first year getting a new house picked and move and sell the old house. That sounds like so much work I rather go sit at my desk and fiddle with things.
__________________
old woman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2011, 01:45 AM   #58
Moderator Emeritus
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 11,043
Quote:
Originally Posted by Danmar View Post
I'm not sure it would get easier. In my case (not typical I know) I think I have some regrets about not sticking it out longer and making a greater success of my career. Perhaps getting to the next level was in reach if I had tried harder and enjoyed it more. This isn't a big deal to me but does cross my mind sometimes. I suspect most people here would think I'm nuts.
I can understand that. Actually my wife is still working because trying to "get to the next level" is what gets her out of bed in the morning. She was promoted to the VP level of a fairly large company yesterday, so there is only one level left for her to conquer. I doubt she will give up until she reaches that ultimate level. Granted, DW is one who gets a lot of her identity from her work and who (I suspect) will have a harder time transitioning to retirement.
__________________
FIREd is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2011, 02:20 AM   #59
Dryer sheet aficionado
Pete44's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Phuket
Posts: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Retch The Grate View Post
Where in Thailand do you live? My uncle lives in Phu Noi, south of Hua Hin, and we've got family friends in Bangkok. After visiting Thailand one of my semi-retirement ideas is starting a game development studio on a beach there. Much lower amount of money coming in needed to fund that lifestyle than living here in California.
Living in a luxurious apartment, multiple pools, five minutes from the beach in Phuket. You can live a nice life here for $2k a month. You have to be willing to make a few sacrifices however. I've given up on beef, wine and cheese for instance. Live like a Thai instead of a westener. Having said that, this is more of an adult Disneyland than the rest of Thailand.

I'll try and do a post about SE Asia alternatives and the financial aspects of living here. I don't want to get off topic any more than I have.
__________________
Pete44 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2011, 07:22 AM   #60
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Spanky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 4,046
Quote:
Originally Posted by FD View Post
I can understand that. Actually my wife is still working because trying to "get to the next level" is what gets her out of bed in the morning. She was promoted to the VP level of a fairly large company yesterday, so there is only one level left for her to conquer. I doubt she will give up until she reaches that ultimate level. Granted, DW is one who gets a lot of her identity from her work and who (I suspect) will have a harder time transitioning to retirement.
More power to her. She may get there eventually. The question is what is next after that?
By the way, my brother who is in his 60s is still working for the next goal - business success. He is definitely financially independent as he has practiced medicine for years and owns a couple of clinics, but he now has also ventured into the patient data management business.
As for me, I like to get into the next level. However, getting there is not important as I do derive great satisfaction from a promotion.
__________________

__________________
May we live in peace and harmony and be free from all human sufferings.
Spanky is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
50 and working (and will be for a while..) tmm99 Hi, I am... 15 07-23-2008 01:10 AM
Almost 50 ... Still Working jayp465 Hi, I am... 10 10-02-2007 11:23 AM
Keep on working? FunGoals Other topics 17 02-01-2005 07:47 AM
Get this if you're still working dory36 Other topics 2 02-09-2004 03:23 AM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:25 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.