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Old 05-11-2011, 07:50 AM   #61
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I lost my identity in retirement.Yes it"s everything I thought it would be.Love it!Love the solitude also.
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Old 05-11-2011, 08:05 AM   #62
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What a great thread! Agree with most that I won't have a problem being "retired." Soon to be 50 and one year away from my retirement date, I've had a great military career and will leave with no regrets, only fond memories. Most of my friends serving on active duty have transitioned to the Federal civilian workforce in the DC area and continue the same grind they had on active duty for most of the same reasons mentioned earlier: prestige, money, few interests outside of work, lifestyle, maybe defining themselves by what they do for a living, etc. I get lots of raised eyebrows when asked what my plans are when I get out of the service, especially when I tell them I'm building a dream home (with cash) on 40 acres (I own) in the boonies of Northern Michigan, where it's so "depressed." When asked what will you do, I simply say "whatever I want" then watch their expression. My only dilemma will be .... how am I going to possibly do all of this fishing, golfing, hunting, reading, gardening, hiking, camping, travelling, camping, exercising, biking, visiting friends and family, volunteering?
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Old 05-11-2011, 08:18 AM   #63
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My only dilemma will be .... how am I going to possibly do all of this fishing, golfing, hunting, reading, gardening, hiking, camping, travelling, camping, exercising, biking, visiting friends and family, volunteering?
UP! Forgot to add: shoveling snow, battling mosquitoes, black fly, etc
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Old 05-11-2011, 09:02 AM   #64
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Lot's of responses that imply "no problems with retirement". This is to be expected with a FIRE discussion board. There are more complicated and diverse views though(perhaps including mine). For those with a fulfilling and interesting career(minority here for sure) retirement isn't as "cut and dried" as some might think. Would be interested in hearing more of these views if possible.
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Old 05-11-2011, 09:07 AM   #65
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For those with a fulfilling and interesting career(minority here for sure) retirement isn't as "cut and dried" as some might think. Would be interested in hearing more of these views if possible.
Why would someone with a fulfilling and interesting career be hanging around an early retirement board? If it were me I'd be too busy to waste my time here.
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Old 05-11-2011, 09:08 AM   #66
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...... Would be interested in hearing more of these views if possible.
Sorry, I can't help. I had a boring and unfulfilling career. I only have uncomplicated and undiverse views.
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Old 05-11-2011, 09:29 AM   #67
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I sometimes wonder if the type of career you had before you retired has alot to do with how happy you are after you retire. IN GENERAL, my guess is that people in high prestige types of careers (ie. doctor, lawyer, ceo, etc.) have a more difficult time adjusting to retirement than people in non high prestige types of work because they miss the extra attention they don't get after they retire. Also, they probably invested more time and effort getting to that level of prestige and have a hard time justifying early retirement because it took so much effort to get to that point. My brother in law is a doctor and almost 70 years old and continues to work and my impression is that his identity is so tied to being a doctor that he has a hard time letting go of it. I was a computer programmer before I retired at 53 and although it was a good career for 30 years, in my opinion it didn't impress people very much...I had little trouble letting go of it and adjusted to retirement fairly quickly.
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Old 05-11-2011, 09:45 AM   #68
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For those with a fulfilling and interesting career(minority here for sure) retirement isn't as "cut and dried" as some might think. Would be interested in hearing more of these views if possible.
I had an interesting and fulfilling career as discussed here. But it wasn't so interesting and fulfilling that I wanted to devote my every waking moment and thought to it. I have other things I want to do in life, and my career prevented me from doing those things . . . so it had to go.

What's more, I can't think of an interesting and fulfilling career that isn't all consuming. It seems that you either punch a clock or are racing against the clock. There is no in between, at least as far as I can tell. I'm sure some folks have found Nirvana: the perfect trade-off between a fulfilling career and a fulfilling life outside of work. Unfortunately I never saw it from any vantage point I've ever held.
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Old 05-11-2011, 10:34 AM   #69
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I didn't retire yet at 63, got a 8% raise this week so now making even more money. I was already saving a major amount of money. I have surpassed my goals for retirement savings but am not thinking so much about retiring.

Two years to Medicare so that is about my minimum. Giving up 60K or so a year to stay home doesn't sound like much fun. First my boyfriend will start asking what I did all day if I don't do cooking and cleaning. I am not motivated without deadlines so knowing how I was as a housewife I can see my days as drinking coffee until afternoon, then a nap or read a book.

I like work because I have to get up, shower and dressed in the car and on the road. The work is easy and the boss appreciates me.

I will wait until I really want to move farther from work so the commute is bad. Then spend the first year getting a new house picked and move and sell the old house. That sounds like so much work I rather go sit at my desk and fiddle with things.
The sarcasm of this post seems too subtle even for me.

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Would be interested in hearing more of these views if possible.
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Why would someone with a fulfilling and interesting career be hanging around an early retirement board? If it were me I'd be too busy to waste my time here.
You know that scene in [insert movie name here] where the main characters realize that they've wandered into the wrong bar?
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Old 05-11-2011, 10:34 AM   #70
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I sometimes wonder if the type of career you had before you retired has alot to do with how happy you are after you retire. IN GENERAL, my guess is that people in high prestige types of careers (ie. doctor, lawyer, ceo, etc.) have a more difficult time adjusting to retirement than people in non high prestige types of work because they miss the extra attention they don't get after they retire.
The book pointed out that many physicians keep working into their 70's (perhaps in a reduced manner). They indeed like the status and the income which their career provided.

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Lot's of responses that imply "no problems with retirement". This is to be expected with a FIRE discussion board. There are more complicated and diverse views though(perhaps including mine). For those with a fulfilling and interesting career(minority here for sure) retirement isn't as "cut and dried" as some might think. Would be interested in hearing more of these views if possible.
There have been a number of threads containing references to this topic...

Our member CarDude (among others) was fiancially successful but didn't quite enjoy all of that free time. He went back into business a couple days a week. You can read his post about it here:

Sucked back into the car business.....

Another member (Emshays) wanted to go back and work (part time):

I flunked retirement

There are more similar posts if you keep looking in the archives...
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Old 05-11-2011, 10:44 AM   #71
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You know that scene in [insert movie name here] where the main characters realize that they've wandered into the wrong bar?
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Old 05-11-2011, 10:44 AM   #72
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More power to her. She may get there eventually. The question is what is next after that?
I guess we'll see when we get there...

As I have said before, I am not militant when it comes to retirement, let alone early retirement. I understand that retiring is not for everyone. If my wife decides that it is not for her, then I am not going to stand in the way. Retiring made me happier and she respects that. If working is what makes her happier, I will respect that.
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Old 05-11-2011, 10:50 AM   #73
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For me, the FI part of FIRE is much more important than the RE part. Everyone is different though. So to each his own...


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Advice I would give based on my experience: If you enjoy your work and are reasonably well paid, keep working until you don't.
I agree with that logic
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Old 05-11-2011, 11:51 AM   #74
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For me, the FI part of FIRE is much more important than the RE part.
Yep, that is what it really is about. I liked my previous boss so much that I would have stayed as long as he did. Told DW they could drag me out of there. And there were some medical issues. But stayed 2 years after FI because I enjoyed work and liked the income & benefits. Now I had 2 two year periods in my 35 year career that I 'worked for a jerk'. Becoming FI meant I jerk proofed my work life and it just got better.

I REALLY agree that the point is FI, then do whatever you want, nothing wrong with work if you like it. Actually getting to FI was an important psychological point for me as I could no longer claim that I 'had' to work and I had to admit that I was actually doing whatever I want.
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Old 05-11-2011, 12:04 PM   #75
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Jerk-proof... that's beautifully said!
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Old 05-11-2011, 01:56 PM   #76
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DW's grandparents are in their late 70's. Grandpa finally stopped working his part-time job last year (he's quite 5 times but 5th time seems to be the charm). He did enjoy the social interaction and ability to educate people but doesn't seem to miss the workplace for even a fraction of a second (I mentioned they're hiring in his area and they have new managers but he just laughed). Grandma has been retired for a good long time.

They're both so busy that they need to schedule us on the calendar when we're getting together. I'm pretty sure we have a lot less going on then them.
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Old 05-11-2011, 02:31 PM   #77
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Sorry, I can't help. I had a boring and unfulfilling career. I only have uncomplicated and undiverse views.
I didn't mean to insult. It's just that the mainstream views have been well expressed here already.
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Old 05-11-2011, 02:33 PM   #78
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Why would someone with a fulfilling and interesting career be hanging around an early retirement board? If it were me I'd be too busy to waste my time here.
Maybe not before they retire but once retired they may have more time and desire to "waste their time here"?
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Old 05-11-2011, 02:37 PM   #79
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Maybe not before they retire but once retired they may have more time and desire to "waste their time here"?
Good point. I didn't think anyone with a career as you described would retire unless they were unable to function - even on an internet board.
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Old 05-11-2011, 03:22 PM   #80
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This is kind of the norm in various asian countries.

When I was in the Philippines for a few weeks last year staying in a condotel (furnished condo rented like a hotel), it was very common to meet males between age 45 – 70 having drinks in the bar with very attractive females age 18 – 28. The benefit of the Philippines is English is a primary language. A few were very open about how far their monthly SS check of $1200 - $1600 can go.

One bedroom units were going for about $20 a day, but monthly rates were available for cheap. One guy retired at 38 with less than 1M, living there full time…. Activities = golfing, drinking, dancing, swimming, girls, massages, etc. not always in that order. He will never work again. It was an interesting beer as he thought I should get a divorce and follow his foot steps.

For the record, I needed a 3 bedroom unit as we were visiting with a large party but due to jet lag I didn't sleep much for the time I was there.
Living expense sounds great.

I see a lot of men go to Thailand/Phillippines for all these reasons, but do you see retired single women there? What do they do?
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