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Old 06-03-2014, 06:28 AM   #21
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Sorry for the side track:
Who knew you can buy Vanguard ETP,s at Fidelity, thanks for the info! How does a person research which ones they sell? (I tried 1/2 hour of research at Fidelity and didn't come up with much other than VIMSX, VMCIX & a couple of other ones.)
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Old 06-03-2014, 06:40 AM   #22
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Sorry for the side track:
Who knew you can buy Vanguard ETP,s at Fidelity, thanks for the info! How does a person research which ones they sell? (I tried 1/2 hour of research at Fidelity and didn't come up with much other than VIMSX, VMCIX & a couple of other ones.)
One can buy/sell ALL of Vanguard's ETFs at Fidelity since Fidelity is a normal brokerage that allows one to buy.sell stocks and ETFs. ETFs are NOT like open-ended mutual funds. One will have to pay a commission to buy/sell Vanguard ETFs at Fidelity. Fideiity does have a deal for no commissions on several ETFs, but those ETFs are not Vanguard ETFs; I think they are iShares ETFs.

I don't know what an ETP is.

VIMSX and VMCIX are not ETFs. They are open-ended mutual funds. One can probably buy most Investor-share class Vanguard mutual funds at Fidelity, too. But the commission would make it not worthwhile to do so.

As for research at Fidelity, why not simply go through the motions of entering an order and cancel before clicking on "submit" or "place order"?
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Old 06-03-2014, 06:56 AM   #23
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I really appreciate all of your replies. To be brief, I've been invested in mutual funds for 20 years and sold out in 2011. I have been in many of the funds you all have suggested. I got spooked by people and doomsday articles, so I bailed. Have been patient waiting for a correction that hasn't occurred. Have upper 6 figures in money market. Ughh! I am 61, retired,with a pension and would be happy with a 3-4% return. Knowing that retirement could last 30 years a conservative portfolio may not be in my best interests but I want to sleep at night. Actually some bond funds are actually lower than when I sold in 2011. When I read interest rates will be going up and QE will be lessening I feel hesitant. I've been through the crashes of 2000 and 2008, but finding when to get back in seems to be elusive.
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Old 06-03-2014, 07:05 AM   #24
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Maybe what you are really looking for is a conservative growth investment with limited volatility?? Vanguard Wellesley is my favorite for this... you can buy it at Fidelity if that's where you want to be but you'd have to pay a $75 transaction fee (not bad if it's a large enough investment).

You could also put together a vaguely similar portfolio on your own using Fidelity No Transaction Fee (NTF) funds. I haven't reviewed Wellesley's holdings lately but I know it has historically been around a 30-70 allocation. Of course, you'd have to spend more time managing/rebalancing then. Here are some decent ones and what I see as a possible allocation you could consider / tweak:

70% bonds (60% Thompson Bond, 5% Fidelity Capital & Income, 5% Loomis Sayles Global)
23% US Stocks (Fidelity Spartan Total Stock Mkt)
7% Foreign Stocks (Harbor International or Artisan International)

Just some ideas based on some NTFs I've stumbled upon... one of many many ways to go.
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Old 06-03-2014, 07:52 AM   #25
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I would give Vanguard a call and have them do a financial review for you. If you put your cash in their MM fund temporarily, they will do the assessment for you without charge, I believe. Then you can look at some short term bond or if you are high income, short term muni bond funds. Vanguard has two that I'm using; muni short term and muni limited term. I get almost 1% tax free compared to most money market funds that pay .01% taxable. Then I'd set up a monthly investment plan in the funds you want, averaging in over a few months to a couple of years, whatever you feel comfortable with. I'd look at total stock, total international and either a balanced or muni balanced stock/bond fund. Decide on your split between bonds and stocks and fit all this in for the long term. I remember many, many years ago I waited for the market to drop so I could buy in .....I waited 3 years and lost tons of money. Now I'm always in but I save a little cash in short term bonds to buy in if the market has a correction. Good Luck, I've dealt with both Vanguard and Fidelity.....have money with both but find Vanguard cheaper and they don't try to sell you as many high cost funds.....Fidelity tries to get you into higher cost mututal funds and ETFs that make them more money. Good Luck!
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Old 06-03-2014, 08:17 AM   #26
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Knowing that retirement could last 30 years a conservative portfolio may not be in my best interests but I want to sleep at night.
What percentage of your portfolio did you have in mutual funds/equities before 2011? What would you like it to be going forward?

I think controlling our emotions is the biggest factor in successful investing. It's easier to do this if you simply ignore all financial news.

Another option may be to find a financial advisor to help you weather bears.
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Old 06-03-2014, 08:49 AM   #27
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Another option may be to find a financial advisor to help you weather bears.
Cheaper yet (by far) is to spend time here participating in (mostly) rational discussions to 'stay the course' rather than paying a third party to hold your hand.
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Old 06-03-2014, 09:22 AM   #28
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Someone risk averse with a 3-5 year (or longer) horizon would probably find Vanguard Wellesley to be an attractive option. Does Fidelity have anything similar?
Not really. He's better off buying in a Vanguard account.
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Old 06-03-2014, 09:32 AM   #29
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Not really. He's better off buying in a Vanguard account.

Not really. My Fidelity Roth IRA is finally old enough that I can switch the funds out of Vanguard. I am not a Boglehead, although I understand the viewpoint.
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Old 06-03-2014, 12:12 PM   #30
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Cheaper yet (by far) is to spend time here participating in (mostly) rational discussions to 'stay the course' rather than paying a third party to hold your hand.
Good point. But I thought we also have a fair number of market timers (and closet market timers) here too?
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Old 06-03-2014, 03:27 PM   #31
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OP, Do you have a dedicated client rep? Have they helped you with the planning tools to determine your ideal asset allocation? If no, call them.
Don't let them sell you anything, but my yearly review helps. They will make fund recommendations. You're going to have to ensure, the ER. Is ok or just stick with Spartan funds.
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Old 06-03-2014, 03:51 PM   #32
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Not really. My Fidelity Roth IRA is finally old enough that I can switch the funds out of Vanguard. I am not a Boglehead, although I understand the viewpoint.
Huh?

Buying Vanguard funds like Wellesley incur a $50 transaction fee at Fidelity, so better off buying such a fund at Vanguard. And, no, Fidelity does not have an equivalent mutual fund.
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Old 06-03-2014, 05:58 PM   #33
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Not really. He's better off buying in a Vanguard account.
There's FFANX, 60% fixed income, 40% equities. Fairly heavily into treasuries, though.
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Old 06-03-2014, 07:51 PM   #34
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I use OAKBX, a balanced fund available at Fidelity. It's about 70% stock, with more cash than bonds right now. Lower volatility than a pure stock fund, but the long term performance is very close.
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Old 06-04-2014, 12:47 AM   #35
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Huh?

Buying Vanguard funds like Wellesley incur a $50 transaction fee at Fidelity, so better off buying such a fund at Vanguard. And, no, Fidelity does not have an equivalent mutual fund.

Well, don't buy Wellesley. There are lots of funds out there.
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Old 06-04-2014, 03:36 AM   #36
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i have used a newsletter for more than 25 years that caters to fidelity funds.

i have followed the models in fidelity insight since i started investing decades ago. i can put portfolios together in my sleep yet i still follow the newsletter.

why?

it gives me discipline , less stress making decisions and keeps me from myself.

that has given me great success as an investor .

i don't always 2nd guess myself, worry about thinking about my next move all the time and it keeps me from thinking i know better and trying to outsmart things.
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Old 06-04-2014, 08:48 AM   #37
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@Mathjck107 - Are those portfolios bases on active or passive funds?
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Old 06-04-2014, 09:15 AM   #38
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All active funds
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Old 06-04-2014, 11:57 AM   #39
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If you buy Wellesley in one big chunk the one time $75 fee (looks like VWINX is $75 not $50) is not too bad. And unlike other places, the fee is only charged when you buy. So you can sell piecemeal in retirement without extra fees. In a situation like that, with a reasonable holding time, $75 might end up being equivalent to a 0.01% ER or less. Just don't rebalance by buying a few more shares.
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Old 06-04-2014, 01:23 PM   #40
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One option to Wellesley if Buffalo Flex Income BUFBX)--it is a Moderate Allocation fund so more like Wellington but a M* 5 Star. BUFBX is a no NTF fund at Fido. Exp ration higher than Wellesley but out-performs both Wellesly and Wellington.
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