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Lost that loving feeling
Old 11-05-2015, 09:44 AM   #1
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Lost that loving feeling

My target date is July and I have not said a word; i will be 62. I am scheduled for TKR surgery later in the month and I heard the boss say Ray will be out until the new year "hopefully he comes back". She is a nice person.



I feel a bit guilty as I called HR and they said your eligible for 25 weeks s/t disability... It is kinda sad after 32 years I don't feel in any rush to come back to work. Gone are the days when I'd would have used a walker to get to my desk....why you say?



I remember it like it was yesterday I was in my thirties - Bob my colleague 53 was a competent guy with 35 years with the company. The firm had a early retirement package/promised RIF (reduction in force) Bob was told if you don't take a package you may not have a job.. He lost about 22% (as I remember) of his pension because he wasn't old enough even with the buyout. At his retirement dinner his wife told me he only missed 1 day in all those years ... Bob had been an accident and hurt his leg - "he just couldn't lift his leg high enough to get on the bus."



My buddy Kenny was also let go a few years ago 37 years on the job. His Tears welled up as he walked out. I felt terrible about it too. Then just A couple days a ago a colleague with 41 years was also shown the door. The firm is highly profitable ...Words fail me.



Like it or not each paycheck starts the relationship anew. I owe them nothing and they owe me nothing... In doing so They've lost something but they simply don't care. I'm glad I'll be out of the game.



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Old 11-05-2015, 09:53 AM   #2
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Great post; I agree that companies will keep you around as long as they find you useful. Period. Just before I left a previous employer (had gotten a new job because I could see my current one vanishing), I walked by a guy I'd seen around for years, probably late 50s, saying to somebody, "They're letting me go- they say there's no work for me". It told me a lot- I'm guessing no one wanted to tell him that his skills were becoming less useful and he needed to upgrade them or find another job.
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Old 11-05-2015, 09:56 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by rayinpenn View Post
My target date is July and I have not said a word; i will be 62. ...


I remember it like it was yesterday I was in my thirties - Bob my colleague 53 was a competent guy with 35 years with the company. The firm had a early retirement package/promised RIF (reduction in force) Bob was told if you don't take a package you may not have a job.. He lost about 22% (as I remember) of his pension because he wasn't old enough even with the buyout. At his retirement dinner his wife told me he only missed 1 day in all those years ... Bob had been an accident and hurt his leg - "he just couldn't lift his leg high enough to get on the bus."

My buddy Kenny was also let go a few years ago 37 years on the job. His Tears welled up as he walked out. I felt terrible about it too. Then just A couple days a ago a colleague with 41 years was also shown the door. The firm is highly profitable ...Words fail me.

Like it or not each paycheck starts the relationship anew. I owe them nothing and they owe me nothing... In doing so They've lost something but they simply don't care. I'm glad I'll be out of the game.
Wow, I bet you can't wait to get out. In my opinion, the company has fallen down on the job.

These type of threads are always interesting--such a wide variance of notice and work environments. I just decided to let the cat out of the bag this week. We are swamped and as a result, we were going to be looking to hire another lawyer or two. Thought it best to let the 2 senior partners know that DW had given her notice in early summer and that we would be retiring no later than fall of '17.

Given my experience level and what I do, my impending departure will impact the type of person(s) that they are looking to hire. Thus, the heads up will help the firm and my co-workers--and they've dealt with me in a very collegial manner over the years.

Be that as it may, I think both of us are approaching the matter correctly.
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Old 11-05-2015, 10:05 AM   #4
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It really does depend on the company culture. One actuary I know, a rocket-scientist genius type with great visibility in the industry, told his employer 5 years ahead of time! It didn't seem to have hurt his career. He stayed with them the full 5 years.

OTOH, my younger brother was working in a place with toxic politics and a sweatshop work ethic (he was expected to be available by company-supplied mobile phone 24/7, including vacations). He was VERY secretive about his ER plans. They put their house on the market and told everyone they were downsizing. It wasn't till my brother was ready to drop the news that he was retiring that they admitted the new home was going to be on a lake in the Carolinas! They actually persuaded him to stay on a couple of months longer, but I could see why he wanted to keep his plans confidential, just in case it went the other way.
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Old 11-05-2015, 10:10 AM   #5
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It really does depend on the company culture. One actuary I know, a rocket-scientist genius type with great visibility in the industry, told his employer 5 years ahead of time! It didn't seem to have hurt his career. He stayed with them the full 5 years.

...
Yeah, DW actually interviewed one prospective replacement last week. Her partners, when given the choice of whether to include her, thought she'd have great insight into whether the personality would mesh well with her present patient population.....
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Old 11-05-2015, 10:33 AM   #6
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Like it or not each paycheck starts the relationship anew.
Sad but true. They made the rules.
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Old 11-05-2015, 10:34 AM   #7
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Like it or not each paycheck starts the relationship anew. I owe them nothing and they owe me nothing... In doing so They've lost something but they simply don't care. I'm glad I'll be out of the game.
Very true, most organizations today place little value on humans. It's up to each of us to protect ourselves from the bs. Megacorp knew me as a number, that's all I was in the majority of eyes. A number to be replaced. Never mind working 80 hour weeks for months, forget about hating to travel but leaving home for 50% of the year. Forget about my DW's disability or my desire to keep it confidential as policy allowed.

Take care of yourself.
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Old 11-05-2015, 10:42 AM   #8
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You've had some great comments on this thread. Here are two, for example.
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Originally Posted by athena53 View Post
Great post; I agree that companies will keep you around as long as they find you useful. Period. Just before I left a previous employer (had gotten a new job because I could see my current one vanishing), I walked by a guy I'd seen around for years, probably late 50s, saying to somebody, "They're letting me go- they say there's no work for me". It told me a lot- I'm guessing no one wanted to tell him that his skills were becoming less useful and he needed to upgrade them or find another job.
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Very true, most organizations today place little value on humans. It's up to each of us to protect ourselves from the bs. Megacorp knew me as a number, that's all I was in the majority of eyes. A number to be replaced. Never mind working 80 hour weeks for months, forget about hating to travel but leaving home for 50% of the year. Forget about my DW's disability or my desire to keep it confidential as policy allowed.

Take care of yourself.
+1, and +1. These days a job is just a job, no matter how many years one has worked at that job. It's a cold, hard world out there and if desired we can reciprocate in kind when we retire. I didn't, and gave them plenty of notice and so on, but not for their benefit so much as for what I would think about myself in the years to come.
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Old 11-05-2015, 11:45 AM   #9
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Psychologically, I feel that it is always good to go out on your own terms and hopefully on a high note!


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Old 11-05-2015, 01:05 PM   #10
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I work for a great guy (have known him for 25+ years through 3 company/rollovers, but have only worked for him since Jan.) and work with great people, many my closest friends. But megacorp is a mediocre company at best and I KNOW they would care less about my 29 years and drop like a hot stone if they thought it was a wise business decision. I don't hate my job, but I know there will be no love lost when I walk in 15 months, likely a day or two before my 55th birthday. I am grateful to have survived these 29 years...... the bombs have fallen very close many times.

I am struggling a bit with the "when to tell" thing, although my close friends here all know my date well. I am thinking sometime next spring, at the T-minus 10 months or so. I respect the guy and "succession planning" is a big thing for him....
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Old 11-05-2015, 01:27 PM   #11
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I would have the operation and I would take as much S/T disability time as possible. It is part of your benefits package. Chances are it will be paid to by an insurance company. Say nothing to anyone about your desire to retire.

Wait until after the surgery an recovery to make your plans. You will have time to consider your future during S/T disability time off. The surgery and the recovery may change your opinion/timing.

I would keep quiet and keep your options open.
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Old 11-05-2015, 01:40 PM   #12
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I would have the operation and I would take as much S/T disability time as possible. It is part of your benefits package. Chances are it will be paid to by an insurance company. Say nothing to anyone about your desire to retire.

Wait until after the surgery an recovery to make your plans. You will have time to consider your future during S/T disability time off. The surgery and the recovery may change your opinion/timing.

I would keep quiet and keep your options open.
That would be my suggestion as well.
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Old 11-05-2015, 01:41 PM   #13
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I would have the operation and I would take as much S/T disability time as possible. It is part of your benefits package. Chances are it will be paid to by an insurance company. Say nothing to anyone about your desire to retire.

Wait until after the surgery an recovery to make your plans. You will have time to consider your future during S/T disability time off. The surgery and the recovery may change your opinion/timing.

I would keep quiet and keep your options open.
+1, Very good post.
As hard as it might be, keep quiet about your plans until you are ready to walk out the door. You never really know how they will take it. You can always say that your operation and recovery is what caused you to decide to do it now, rather than later.
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Old 11-05-2015, 01:46 PM   #14
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Take the ST and go for it!

I'm always reminded of a colleague who I worked with for 30+ years. He was "fortunate" not to have been shown the door (like I was--not that I had anything to complain about) when the company was acquired.

He wanted to work "just two more years" to get his full FRA from SS. You guessed it: he came down with pancreatic cancer and only got about six months of SS.

Lessons........
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Old 11-05-2015, 01:49 PM   #15
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+1, Very good post.
As hard as it might be, keep quiet about your plans until you are ready to walk out the door. You never really know how they will take it. You can always say that your operation and recovery is what caused you to decide to do it now, rather than later.
In my old company "I'm giving you a one months' notice" was met with: " One month? I think one hour should be all you need to clean out your desk".

Our approach/thinking was having "dead men walking" created problems and often made martyrs out of those leaving. Better to just go when the time is right.
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Old 11-05-2015, 01:59 PM   #16
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In DW's efforts to depart the company, she's been met with a tidal wave of reciprocal generosity. Slight hints of possibly retiring soon have been met with raises and bonuses. "I want to take my paid sabbatical now or I might just leave" was met with an extra 5 weeks paid time off last year and the full 3 months paid time off this year.

Even when she resigned in September, they offered to cut her hours 20%, keep paying full time and let her work from home all the time. So she stayed.

They are working to find a few people to replace her and also on-shore some of the work back from India (Raleigh workers cost less apparently...), and so far hired person with one more on the way.

So far the relative transparency has been met with nothing but generosity from the company. DW is hoping for a layoff and severance since they are in the middle of massive layoffs. The boss men know she's looking for an exit.
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Old 11-05-2015, 02:00 PM   #17
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The sad but true fact is, no matter how long, how loyal or how good of a worker you have been there comes a time after you have aged and have topped out in your pay grade that it is simply more cost effective to buy you out/let you go and replace you with someone younger at a cheaper wage. It's the constant evolution of the workplace and nothing personal. No one is special and everyone is replaceable. It's not a question of how good and loyal of an employee you have been, it is a question of economics. That is why it is so important that you have your priorities in order and are ready when the time comes.
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Old 11-05-2015, 02:14 PM   #18
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I worked for two mega corps in my career, and while I think I was very well "compensated", especially the last company, I was never under any illusion that they cared about anything more than what I could do for them.
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Old 11-05-2015, 02:24 PM   #19
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It is sad, but true for most, including me. I can remember how much I enjoyed my work, put in crazy hours of my own volition, advancing up the ladder, relocations, etc. Probably lasted almost 25 years, but then began a slow decline that really accelerated in the last year or two. Best we can do is leave at the top, though some companies have other ideas that we can't possibly foresee...
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Old 11-05-2015, 02:25 PM   #20
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Rayinpenn,

Good post. I just wanted to make a couple of comments regarding your upcoming total knee replacement surgery. I worked for MegaCorp and had 2 total hip replacement surgeries while employed. Like your company, MegaCorp had 26 weeks short-term disability per year; however, the insurance company has it down to a "science" regarding how long your particular disability period will last - provided all goes well with the surgery and the rehabilitation afterwards. For both total hip replacements 5 years apart, my insurance claims worker told me prior to the surgery I would be back to work in "89 to 93 days". I was back to work in 91 days both times. Unless things go badly, you won't be able to take the full 26 weeks.

Speaking of rehab, hope you have lined up a good physical therapist. That made all the difference for me. I really liked the company I picked and the physical therapist in charge of that office. TKR rehab is more difficult than THR from the standpoint of having to get a certain degree of bend in the new joint after surgery. Just remember, the physical therapist is putting you through those exercises for your benefit - even when you think they enjoy inflicting "pain" .

Good luck.
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