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Old 05-25-2016, 10:39 AM   #41
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How many good years to go?

I'm 68 and any year past now is a good year. Very healthy so these years are extra good years.
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Old 05-25-2016, 10:39 AM   #42
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I'm 28 and have anxiety that I will wake up one day and be 65.
I turned 40 in Saudi Arabia....wrote to a (since dead) aunt, and observed that, when last I 'looked' I was 20, and that I had gone from 20 to 40 in one leap that I barely noticed......and that, in another 20 years I'd be 60.....so, in two almost imperceptible steps I'd have jumped from 20 to 60...(and now I'm almost 70% done on the 3rd step).

Your anxiety is well founded.....use it to your best advantage.
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Old 05-25-2016, 10:47 AM   #43
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I am 58 and am fortunate to be in good shape. No issues with back, joints, knees, etc. I really think not being very good in sports that demanded a lot of physicality (football, basketball, etc.) helped me in the long run . Not getting as many hits or running up and down the court as much as some of my friends who excelled in these sports has left me in better physical condition that some of them. I stopped my "weekend warrior" days of playing contact/flag football in my early 40's and full court basketball against my kids and their friends in my early 50's.

I'm learning that just staying active everyday seems to help delaying things... walking, hiking, biking, gym workouts, yoga. Walking the golf course, or riding the course but keeping the cart on the cart path also helps. Even mowing -I've been delaying fixing/replacing my riding mower from last year because I'm finding what a good workout I'm getting with a push mower). Even now working at home I put together a makeshift standing desk so that I could stand up more than I sit during working hours. And then there is, shall I say, "regular physical intimacy" without need for chemical enhancement that I'm sure is a benefit of keeping in shape.

I have been going for thorough annual checkups every year since I was 40... and I am SURPRISED at how few of my male friends do. These annual checks have uncovered several issues that were able to be addressed and resolved in plenty of time and improved my health. It is incredible how the thought of getting their prostate checked strikes fear into them .

I'm also paying much more attention to food... I used to think DW was crazy for counting calories and weighing food, but..now I'm doing it. Using fitbit helps. I look at it as another "nerdy" way to mess around with numbers. It also helps with tracking my weight, which is down almost 30 pounds from when I "peaked". I don't really diet, but eat more balanced and in moderation. While my days of eating a 16 ounce Skittles bags in a single sitting a couple of times a week are over, I'll still enjoy a 2 ounce bag 1-2 times a month guilt free .

So I'm hoping I can get some good years for a while - though I would agree that 70 seems to be when things start catching to most (not all) folks. My goal is to trying to keep moving and active as much as I can. I'll always remember the grandfather of one of my friends growing up who must have been in his 80s but was still very active. Once he was doing some work in their yard, and we offered to help, and he said, "Thanks, but I'm fine and I like the activity. The day will come when I won't be able to do this anyone, so I want to do it for as long as I can." Wise words.
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Old 05-25-2016, 10:53 AM   #44
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I'm 62 and I play competitive doubles tennis 3 times a week in a league of folks between 55 and 70. In the summer I play in an over 60 competitive USTA league also. My body recovers well with a one day's rest but some of the older guys who are 70 are not recovering as well and lately have reduce their playing to once a week. So I'm thinking I still have a few more years of competitive tennis in me before I'll have to revert to recreational tennis once or twice a week.
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Old 05-25-2016, 10:54 AM   #45
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I think worrying about how many good years do I have left is wrong-headed. When and if your years become other than good, you will know. Until then, laissez les bon temps rouler!

Ha
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Old 05-25-2016, 11:07 AM   #46
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65 here, still mountain biking 10-15 miles 3x a week, do all the yard work and maintenance but do try to avoid ladders..
If it wasn't for the yard work I scheduled for today, I'd be out on a bike for at least a 12 mile ride, it is such a nice day. Biking is the one activity I very much enjoy and while my speed and mileage is not the same as it once was, it's great exercise and easier on my joints. Haven't worked up to doing my hilly farm country course yet after the winter break, but have enjoyed the flat 16 mile beach roads several times.
I must admit, I'd probably enjoy activities more if I'd drop about 15-20 pounds that have slowly been added. Marathon running weight was 25 pounds and 25 years ago!
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Old 05-25-2016, 11:25 AM   #47
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Kind of a depressing thread, but a good reminder to make the most out of my 30's, 40's and 50's. For general planning purposes, I figure I'll fall apart some time in my 60's. Two male grandparents didn't last much longer than 70 before things fell apart. I've noticed a huge change between age 58 or 59 and age 64 for my dad. I figure that's the script I'll follow largely because of genetics.

At 35 I can still do pretty much anything I could at 18 though it's not always as easy (and sometimes hurts more the next day ).
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Old 05-25-2016, 11:28 AM   #48
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Ah, at some point, you will think "Why even bother", and just sit in your rocking chair and enjoy the petunia on your front porch.

Is it depressing? No, it's just life. Life is not always about jumping up and down with exuberance. Life can be very sober, and even sad.
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Old 05-25-2016, 11:33 AM   #49
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Will turn 60 in a couple of weeks but still very active. I run at least 3 days a week, lift weights 3 days a week, hike, bike, kayak, waterski, play basketball, etc. I have not really noticed much decline in physical abilities other than a bit slower pace when running.

I do think resistance training helps one age more slowly. I also switched to a LCHF diet a couple of years ago, and it suits me well as I have no problem staying at an almost ideal weight (for me) while eating as much as I desire. I feel much younger at almost 60 than I ever hoped/expected -- guess when I was a youngster, most folks over 55 seemed to be quite inactive (and old).
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Old 05-25-2016, 11:33 AM   #50
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Ah, at some point, you will think "Why even bother", and just sit in your rocking chair and enjoy the petunia on your front porch.
that's why I have a ps4
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Old 05-25-2016, 11:40 AM   #51
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I think worrying about how many good years do I have left is wrong-headed. When and if your years become other than good, you will know. Until then, laissez les bon temps rouler!

Ha
I agree with this attitude. I "discovered" exercise late, at age 47; prior to then I was an overweight couch potato. I'll be 64 in a couple of months. These past 17 years have been great.
As I've aged some accommodations have already been made. I no longer run marathons or even half-marathons due to back issues. But I still enjoy my shorter runs, along with cycling and swimming.
I get encouragement from 3 things:1) my brother is 6 years older than I and still cycles almost every day. If my back ultimately prevents me from any running, I'll replace the running days with cycling days. 2) at the Y where I swim, there are many older guys still swimming their laps. I don't know how far they go, but I see them each of the 4 days that I'm there. 3) Several years back I met a fellow racer at a 10 mile race. He was 72 years old, and celebrating a 5 year anniversary of his heart surgery. Now, that is encouraging, that even if a bad medical issue arises there is the real possibility of bouncing back.
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Old 05-25-2016, 11:41 AM   #52
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Kind of a depressing thread, but a good reminder to make the most out of my 30's, 40's and 50's. For general planning purposes, I figure I'll fall apart some time in my 60's. Two male grandparents didn't last much longer than 70 before things fell apart. I've noticed a huge change between age 58 or 59 and age 64 for my dad. I figure that's the script I'll follow largely because of genetics.

At 35 I can still do pretty much anything I could at 18 though it's not always as easy (and sometimes hurts more the next day ).
You'll notice a much bigger drop off in your 40s. Stuff at 35 that ached for a couple days and was funny/annoying becomes "man... my shoulder has hurt for two years now..."
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Old 05-25-2016, 11:45 AM   #53
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Ah, at some point, you will think "Why even bother", and just sit in your rocking chair and enjoy the petunia on your front porch.

Is it depressing? No, it's just life. Life is not always about jumping up and down with exuberance. Life can be very sober, and even sad.
And here's the anthem:

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Old 05-25-2016, 11:45 AM   #54
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You'll notice a much bigger drop off in your 40s. Stuff at 35 that ached for a couple days and was funny/annoying becomes "man... my shoulder has hurt for two years now..."
Had to laugh! Or, "my shoulder hurts all the time, but I just don't pay attention to it anymore."
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Old 05-25-2016, 11:46 AM   #55
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I won't turn 55 until later this year, so maybe I'm not old enough to have the right perspective. One of the first things I'll do after I turn 55 is run another 100 mile race. Someone talked about joints wearing out, but that doesn't happen uniformly. My joints are fine, and I know older people who run a lot more than me who are fine, and people who do a lot less who are not.


I had two ski friends still out there in their early 90s. Another mid 80s friend who skis and took 3 cruises last year where he and his wife (same age) closed down the dance floor every night, which they'll also do around town on occasion. Another 70 year old friend still runs more than one 100 miler a year.


I try to picture myself being like these people more than those who are on a steep downhill slide in their 60s. If it happens to me, it happens, but I'm going to enjoy the active life as long as I can and not worry about when it will end.
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Old 05-25-2016, 11:52 AM   #56
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I turn 60 in August, but have been fighting cervical disc degeneration for ten years. Pain management has kept me going but things like lower back issues, essential tremors and arthritis have been doing their best to slow me down further. Walking is my exercise of choice and has helped me lose weight and kept my energy levels good. My days of strenuous activities are long gone, but I had some great adventures while I was young, especially while in the Air Force. These days I love walking the beach, reading and going on cruises. DW's knees are shot and can't get them fixed until she loses some weight, which she is working on. Then we hope to do some traveling around Europe and east Asia. I lost my mom at 61 and my dad at 72, but I hope to beat them by quite a bit.


Enjoying life!
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Old 05-25-2016, 11:58 AM   #57
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I'm 28 and have anxiety that I will wake up one day and be 65.
Occasionally, I lie in bed at night and think on the possibility that any one of a thousand things in my body could suddenly stop working while I'm sleeping, and I'd be completely out of luck. I mean, A Ford Pinto is considerably less complex than a human body, and those things broke down all the time

Both my parents made it to their mid-80's, with their last few years not being so great, so I'm working on the assumption that any fun that requires the full use of my body should be done in the next 20 years (I am now 52). But heck, as NW-Bound says, life is life, and if you've had plenty of fun when younger, whose to say that sitting on the porch isn't enjoyable too? I already spend a lot of time kickin' back with my kitties at home, and love every minute of it.
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Old 05-25-2016, 12:05 PM   #58
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Turning 65 next month and have been retired now eleven years and all very good years. That said, I have noticed some change in what I can do as opposed to what I use to be able to do. Can't drive the golf ball 270 yards, maybe 220 now with a little roll. Can't run the bases and slide like I could twenty years ago, basketball skills have taken a hit as well. The bottom line is, we are all different, some at 50 don't have any good years left and some at 70 have quite a few. Enjoy the day and try not to worry about it and just live life the best you can.
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Old 05-25-2016, 12:37 PM   #59
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I think worrying about how many good years do I have left is wrong-headed. When and if your years become other than good, you will know. Until then, laissez les bon temps rouler!
True enough. Just keep on keeping on.

If all goes well, I'll turn 70 next month. I can (and do) still do everything I did at 40, just not as fast, not as heavy, not as frequently, more gently, etc.

Life is good until it isn't.
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Old 05-25-2016, 01:01 PM   #60
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How many GOOD years do you think you have left?

All

At age 80, every day is a gift. Some of the items on the "lists" that others have posted, have never been in my own repitoire, like hiking tall mountains. (Mt Marcy was my limit 30 years ago). Golf, or running never a favorite.
Swimming was the thing until about 4 years ago, when pool access became more time consuming.

Age 75 was the tipping point. Up until then virtually no limits as to the activities (though naturally, endurance changed.) So boogie boarding, sailing, and limited sports were still in the mix.

Limitations? Arthritis, idiopathic hand neuropathy and newly discovered asymptomatic Afib... but nothing to limit the physical activities, so I still bike, 15 to 20 miles (mostly on the flat), canoe... about an hour is my limit, and use my antique Vitamaster exercise bike 1/2 to 1 hr/day. (no resistance)

So much for sporty kind of stuff. More important is the physicality of work. Our lakeside camp is a full time never ending project. Repairs to a 40 year old camp, 400sf deck, a 400sf add a room cabin, water, heat , 13 40 foot+ oak trees, and an aging wooden seawall... plus flowers, mowing, mole repair, bird feeder maintenance... and controlling Rocky the Raccoon's attack and damages... Up, down, over and under, a continuous muscle challenge. Now rebuilding my pontoon boat. Exhausting but totally fun. Begin at 6AM, work til lunch at 1PM, and then vegetate watching TV and napping.

So yeah... still there, at half speed or less. Initially not much of a difference, except maybe off road biking changed to paved roads, and moving, pushing, carrying or lifting changed from 50 pounds to 25 pounds. the mental acceptance was slow in coming, but now that it's here, not so much frustration. In another year, will probably hire people to do some of the stuff that I've been doing my whole life.

Every year is a good year... Every day, a good day... Slower, but still really GOOD.
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