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Old 07-07-2016, 06:25 AM   #21
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Well, I do not do raw shellfish or sashimi. They do not work for me.

I would grill them all. You may not care for it, but I like them that way.
I love grilled oysters. Even fried, just can't do raw.

I'm splurging tonight as I'm having buddies over for a cookout. Bought a few NY Strips to grill. Hope I won't regret it later when I'm counting my stash in my old age.
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Old 07-07-2016, 06:55 AM   #22
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The oysters will be shucked at the sink and eaten there, no ice or plates needed.

I think we'll do the shrimp tails raw and fry the heads as suggested.

The fish will be boring by comparison (grilled) and consumed the day after.

And you can do the same thing at home just like me!

Live Sashimi Grade Spot Prawns / Sweet Shrimp (Amaebi) – Catalina Offshore Products
I'm lucky enough to live near their warehouse - they have in-person deals as well - you have to don a hairnet and have to have close toed shoes on - but you can go back and talk to the guys in the warehouse and get even better prices on their sushi grade fish.

We always hit them on 12/24 - to buy fish for our "7 fishes" Christmas eve dinner.
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Old 07-07-2016, 07:01 AM   #23
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Interesting article. I have noticed that even with some unexpected expenses (about 8K last year and now around 5K this year so far, which isn't bad at all) I am still saving a significant amount of $. My numbers indicated that when I FIREd, I would be saving *some*, but not to the extent that I have been. Of course, some of this is because my DW continues to w*rk, but even if she quit today, we would *still* be saving. It's an odd thing...so if it keeps up, well...I guess I will need to figure out where all that $$$ will go when we die since we are childless childfree.

I do think that there is the excitement of seeing my portfolio grow...it gives me a lot of security and a big, fat grin on my face.
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Old 07-07-2016, 07:11 AM   #24
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In my grandmother's case, her net worth continued to grow right up until the final year. But from August 2014, when she had to go into the emergency room until her death in May of 2015, she blew through something like $62K. However, $14,000 of that was to re-do the bathroom to make it wheelchair accessible, and putting in a walk-in tub, as we initially thought she'd be coming back home. And, I remember the funeral being $12,000. The remaining $34,000 was for assisted living facility costs, and then for nursing home care once she got too sick to be in the assisted living place.

In Grandmom's case though, she got a pension and social security that probably totaled about $40,000 per year, so it's not too hard to grow your net worth when you have that advantage.
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Old 07-07-2016, 07:16 AM   #25
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In my grandmother's case, her net worth continued to grow right up until the final year. But from August 2014, when she had to go into the emergency room until her death in May of 2015, she blew through something like $62K. However, $14,000 of that was to re-do the bathroom to make it wheelchair accessible, and putting in a walk-in tub, as we initially thought she'd be coming back home. And, I remember the funeral being $12,000. The remaining $34,000 was for assisted living facility costs, and then for nursing home care once she got too sick to be in the assisted living place.
That's what I have been telling my Dad. He seems a bit frustrated at the amount of $ he has accumulated over his life and feels like there is nothing he wants to do with it. He doesn't express much regret, but I do know he wishes he had traveled more before Mom got sick. But, as I remind him, they traveled A LOT before and after he retired, and I think that they had slowed down on that considerably a few years before Mom wasn't able to travel (and enjoy it). I think it's good he has a good amount of $, because if he gets ill, he has the means to stay in the home for a long while and I know that is what is most important to him.
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Old 07-07-2016, 07:22 AM   #26
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...NW Bound, that food looks delicious.
Thank you. We still go to restaurants occasionally, but I try to do a lot of things at home. For me, part of the fun of food is in cooking, as I try to not eat too much.

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I love grilled oysters. Even fried, just can't do raw.

I'm splurging tonight as I'm having buddies over for a cookout. Bought a few NY Strips to grill. Hope I won't regret it later when I'm counting my stash in my old age.
Eating at home saves money and makes your stash last longer. And for me, it can be more fun than going to restaurants, and certainly more challenging.
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Old 07-07-2016, 07:31 AM   #27
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It's OK.



"Money is much more exciting than anything it buys" -- Mignon McLaughlin
lol, dude is not doing it correctly then, I most definitely did not work 30 years just to "watch" my money sit in a bank account.

Personally I think a lot of traits you had during your younger, working years, you keep when you are retired. If you tend to be on the frugal side of life while working most likely you'll remain that way.

Now I always say I'm the exception to the ER board rules. Yep, I like my toys and I have no problem spending money on my toys. while I have no intention of spending down to nothing, I also have no problem with spending $2,000 on a luxury handbag if I really like it.

And to me, eating at home all the time is against my religion, lol that's why God invented restaurants. Do I do it every day? nope, do I stress because I love maryland style Crabs and for the 4th of July, I sprang for a bushel of crabs and had them cooked and cleaned? nope.

I try very hard to live below my means (some years hubby and I succeed way better than other years) but I'm not giving up vacations to pay my mortgage off early.
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Old 07-07-2016, 08:00 AM   #28
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I also enjoy building & counting the stash for the security & peace of mind. We've never had to spend principal, it's almost an anathema to me. But we don't want for anything with the six figure income the portfolio produces. But eventually we'll need to look at splurging a bit more, since we have no children and have no reason to leave a large legacy. But I'm only 57, DW is 48 so there is time. We're talking with our accountant about setting up a charitable trust or foundation of some kind.
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Old 07-07-2016, 08:08 AM   #29
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Hey, it's fine that some people do not like to cook. When we see so many restaurants, we tell each other that if people ate out as little as we do, so many workers would be unemployed. So, you are contributing to society by spreading your wealth. How do I criticize that?

If we were all alike, the world would be a boring place. Also, the right of people to seek happiness in their own way (as long as it does not harm somebody else) is written in the Declaration of Independence. Is this adopted country of mine great or what?

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This issue is one I think of quite a bit. I have to admit it is hard to actually spend principal, and I guess that means I like to count it too. At some point though, I really need to spend it on something or give more away while alive. I think I can muster up the courage.
You have so much more than I do, and if you spend your stash down to 1/3 or possibly even much less, you still have more than I do now. But can you see yourself doing that?

Again, I have much less and I also cannot bear seeing having 1/2 of what I do now. I keep a diary logging the total of my investable assets (who cares about the homes), and can see when I had only 1/2 of the current value. Do I want to go back there? No. If the market god takes some back, I cannot help it, but I cannot willingly bear to do it myself. Call me Scrooge, I don't care.

By the way, grilling oysters obviates the hassle of shucking them. They've got a built-in cooking indicator too. When they open up, time to get out that lemon slice. Yummy!
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Old 07-07-2016, 08:10 AM   #30
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The way I look at it, if the day comes when I need expensive end of life care, I don't want to feel like I'm impoverishing DW by buying it. She may also need expensive end of life care and she shouldn't have to rely on Medicaid. If there is money left over, someone else can have it.

So, you can have your oysters and Gucci, I have my piece of mind. YMMV
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Old 07-07-2016, 08:19 AM   #31
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I doubt that many people want to spend down to nothing. Most would rather live well and leave as much as possible to heir families or charities. If I had no kids I would set up some kind of charitable foundation and leave everything to that. I would still try to maximize the remaining portfolio while living an active, comfortable life. We sold our weekend house earlier this year giving us substantially increased spending power (~4% of the principle + house costs) yet we haven't changed how large we live at all. The main difference we expect is more travel replacing the time spent at the weekend place.
Congrats on the sale of the weekend place. I still recall seeing some posts of yours about the place (how often have I told y'all about my superior memory?).

When I bought my 2nd place 10 years ago, I was not into RV'ing. Now, I like to do RV, and still want to do fly-and-drive, so do not spend as much time at my high-country home as I thought. I do not want to sell it though. At some point, I may be old and tired of travel, and the home will be the place to where I escape the summer heat and to rest my bones.
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Old 07-07-2016, 08:22 AM   #32
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So, you can have your Gucci, I have my oysters and peace of mind. YMMV
Fix it for you. For crying out loud, these oysters are not gold plated!
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Old 07-07-2016, 08:22 AM   #33
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Use it or loose it. You don't want to be the richest man in the grave yard.
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Old 07-07-2016, 08:25 AM   #34
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Most excellent, dude! Your spending stimulates the economy, driving up the price of the stocks that I hold. We both win.
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Old 07-07-2016, 08:27 AM   #35
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Use it or loose it. You don't want to be the richest man in the grave yard.
But when you're dead, it's not going to matter anymore.
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Old 07-07-2016, 08:28 AM   #36
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But when you're dead, it's not going to matter anymore.
Yeah, the important thing is while you are still alive, you feel rich and secure.

Note that I said "feel", as I do not believe in flashing it.
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Old 07-07-2016, 08:30 AM   #37
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We we are spending down currently given market returns so far this year. Kids off to college next year then downsize which will reduce rate quite a bit. Finally SS kicking in @ 70 year which will cover nearly 1/2 of budget.


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Old 07-07-2016, 08:31 AM   #38
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Why should someone else spend it? "Feeling" rich is not as fun as spending it.
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Old 07-07-2016, 08:43 AM   #39
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Who says we are not spending?

The joy of spending must be balanced against the joy of "counting". We all have different weights to give to each of the two pleasures.

When I learned Optimal Control Theory in engineering school many years ago, the first thing taught was that there are an infinite number of optimal strategies. It is because there are an infinite number of criteria one can choose from. First, you decide what is optimal for you, then you apply the theory to find a way to achieve that criteria. The theory tells you how to get to the point you have chosen. It cannot chose the end goal for you.

So, some want to spend down to 0. Some spend minimally. Most of us are in between those two extremes, and there are infinite shades of gray.
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Old 07-07-2016, 08:54 AM   #40
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Our spending on things has gone down substantially in retirement. And it went down even more when we downsized our home and went down to one car.

But our travel costs have increased significantly, more so than the decreases in our living costs. So we are spending. Not the assets, but certainly a healthy portion of the income that is derived from those assets. Our intention is to be financially prudent but to keep doing this until such time as we do not have the health or the inclination to travel. After all, we could get hit by a bus tomorrow or drop dead with some ailment.

Neither of us want to be the richest person in the retirement home nor do we want to sit there regretting all the things we wanted to do but never got around to doing.


There are some n'er do well relatives that we could help but there would be little use in that. Any help would be squandered so why waste the money? Our assets will flow down to our children, and to some degree, our grandchildren.
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