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Re: Mutual Fund to ETF/ Index mapping website ?
Old 11-23-2006, 09:54 PM   #21
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Re: Mutual Fund to ETF/ Index mapping website ?

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Originally Posted by Delawaredave
Any good websites / analyses that suggest a corresponding Index or ETF for a given mutual fund ?

I have a bunch of managed funds - interested in finding the "best matching" index or ETF.

I'd like to make a table of my current managed funds and the "best match" index or ETF.

Thanks !
Maybe I am mis-reading your question, but........the annual reports for every managed fund I have list a "correspoding" index that the manager is trying to "beat". They usually also include a graph with the fund and the index overlayed for x years showing, for example the growth of $10k investment over 5 yrs or more. Morningstar also "selects" an index that it deems appropriate for comparison to the fund. Any large fund company (Fidelity/Vanguard/etc) generally has the M* analysis.
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Old 11-26-2008, 06:24 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by LOL! View Post
One can use a limit order to buy ETFs, but not mutual funds.

I like to purchase ETFs on big down days in the market. This is because studies show that if you miss the worst N days in a give time span, that you come out ahead of the market averages. It is very easy to determine when a day is a "worst" day just by looking at the stock market about 15 minutes before the close of trading. So that's when I tend to purchase a chunk of shares. I use a limit order so I know the max price I am going to pay. It's probably not an advantage, but it seems so to me.

OK, the above quote is dated 11-22-06. In another post LOL talks about trying to take advantage of 150 point drops. Screw the 150 point drops. LOL, if you're out there, are you still pursing this strategy amongst the 400+ point drops? And, if so, how well is your approach working? You most be in hog heaven because there have been so many "worst days" to choose from.
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Old 11-26-2008, 06:33 PM   #23
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But of course!

However, I no longer have the income I used to have, since I am semi-retired. Thus, I don't really much cash anymore. However, I still do my rebalancing into stocks on those big down days.

And you have noted that "best days" and "worst days" seem to come close together in time, right?
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Old 11-26-2008, 08:39 PM   #24
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But of course!

However, I no longer have the income I used to have, since I am semi-retired. Thus, I don't really much cash anymore. However, I still do my rebalancing into stocks on those big down days.

And you have noted that "best days" and "worst days" seem to come close together in time, right?

Duly noted. And, it must take a certain amount of bravery to rebalance when the "worse" days are followed by several "worser" days. I admire your approach.
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