Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Re: No pension. No health benefits.
Old 09-17-2005, 05:41 PM   #41
Moderator Emeritus
Martha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: minnesota
Posts: 13,212
Re: No pension. No health benefits.

Latest from Business Week on healthcare costs:

http://www.businessweek.com/magazine...2/b3915436.htm

All told, the U.S. will probably spend an estimated $1.9 trillion on health care in 2005, $100 billion more than the prior year. That's 15.7% of the gross domestic product. Despite such mammoth sums, hospitals will continue to struggle to stay solvent, employers will continue to face higher insurance premiums, employees will continue to shoulder a higher percentage of those premiums, and insurers -- well, insurers will continue to do very well, thank you, because they get to pass on their higher costs to the policy holders. Though not, of course, to the 45 million people who are uninsured -- 15.6% of the population.

At some point, and probably in the not-too-distant future, this level of spending will almost certainly become unsustainable. Expensive new drugs and medical technologies, a growing number of uninsured, and an aging, overweight population virtually guarantee cost increases will climb back to the 12% to 13% range in a few years. By 2010, UBS Securities estimates that health care will consume 17.4% of the GDP. "In my view, the pressure is not off costs at all," says William McGeever, a UBS health-care analyst. "I see nothing on the horizon that will moderate increases."

All of this might be O.K. if we were getting maximum bang for all those bucks, but we're not. Other industrialized nations, which have universal health coverage, spend less of their GDP on health care -- 8% to 10%. Yet they rank well above the U.S. in average life expectancy and infant mortality rate, standard measures of a nation's health. The U.S. ranks in the bottom quartile of all industrialized nations on those two measures.

Nor does the U.S. do well on more specific quality measures. In a study of a broad range of procedures in five highly industrialized nations, released last spring in the well-regarded journal Health Affairs, researchers determined that the extra spending on health care in the U.S. is "not buying better experiences with the health care system, with the exception of shorter waits for nonurgent surgery." That conclusion was backed up by a study released in December by Veteran's Administration researchers: They found that only 51% of patients nationwide receive med- ically recommended care for their conditions. So much for the oft-heard claim that the U.S. has the best medical system in the world.

Despite this dire situation, there are no serious proposals in Washington to redress the miserable cost/quality equation. President George W. Bush's main health-care reform initiative, the introduction of tax credits for Health Savings Accounts, is likely only to siphon off healthy adults from existing insurance plans, making it harder to offset the costs of treating the sick. At the same time, the shift to high-deductible policies by many employers is likely to cause some consumers to delay health care until their conditions become serious -- and more expensive to treat.
__________________

__________________
.


No more lawyer stuff, no more political stuff, so no more CYA

Martha is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Re: No pension. No health benefits.
Old 09-17-2005, 08:40 PM   #42
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 927
Re: No pension. No health benefits.

Quote:
I wonder what percentage of the population has a $1 million health crisis. It's probably more common than winning the lottery, but is it even a 1/10th of 1%?

intercst
This is hardly scientific, but I know THREE people myself who've had heart transplants.* Pre-transplant care, the operation itself, and post-op medication / treatments are well over $2 million for all of them.*

Quote:
Even a healthy person should have regular exams that are not covered if you have a catastrophic only plan.
I do not know the costs but full blood tests should be done once a year and other forms of preventative medicine are important. Out of pocket expenses would be very high.
And prescriptions are necessary for many people a couple of times a year.
HMO's may be a good choice, PPO's better.
I enrolled myself in a longitudinal study of heart disease factors 20 years ago.* I get the whole ball of wax -- treadmill, diet assessment, lung-capacity test, blood pressure measurement, and complete cholesterol, blood, and diabetes screenings every three years.* I also get other tests on a one-off basis: carotid artery ultrasound, ovarian ultrasound (what this has to do with heart disease is entirely beyond me), bone-density scan, heart scan, etc.

Don't know what else is out there, but volunteering can get you a lot of free screening if you can find it.* *(Some of them even pay you.) Craig's List has various opportunities, depending upon where you live.


FWIW,
Caroline* *
__________________

__________________
Caroline is offline   Reply With Quote
Re: No pension. No health benefits.
Old 09-17-2005, 08:56 PM   #43
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso) Give me a forum ...
REWahoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Texas Hill Country
Posts: 42,149
Re: No pension. No health benefits.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Caroline
This is hardly scientific, but I know THREE people myself who've had heart transplants.
I'm not much of a believer in "bad Karma", but nevertheless, I'm kinda glad I don't know you Caroline. Nothing personal, you understand...

__________________
Numbers is hard

When I hit 70, it hit back

Retired in 2005 at age 58, no pension
REWahoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Re: No pension. No health benefits.
Old 09-17-2005, 09:06 PM   #44
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 768
Re: No pension. No health benefits.

Quote:
Despite this dire situation, there are no serious proposals in Washington to redress the miserable cost/quality equation.
Washington, and the state capitals, are the primary reason it is so expensive to begin with. When the politicians get involved, things tend to become expensive and hard to get.
__________________
Michael is offline   Reply With Quote
Re: No pension. No health benefits.
Old 09-17-2005, 10:56 PM   #45
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,375
Re: No pension. No health benefits.

Probably a generational thing, but I was raised in a small logging town in the Sierras, and you went to see the Dr. if you broke something, or couldn't stop the bleeding. I know for a fact that my parents never had a physical of any kind. There was also no vets in town, and if your pet (dog or cat), became deathly ill, it was up to you to put him down, to stop suffering.

I see where Caroline sure does take a lot of tests, and in talking to my daughters (Age 38 and 33), they also get annual physicals.

I have pretty much carried on the tradition of going to the Dr. if you break something, or can't stop the bleeding. (My kids are on my case about this a lot.)

I tore a a ligament in my knee about 14 years ago, and had to have it repaired. (Last time I saw a Dr.).

Caroline mentioned that she knew 3 acquaintences that needed heart transplants. I
have no reason to doubt her, but I'm 69, and have never known anybody personally that had this drastic procedure.


__________________
Jarhead* is offline   Reply With Quote
Re: No pension. No health benefits.
Old 09-18-2005, 07:20 AM   #46
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
DFW_M5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 4,982
Re: No pension. No health benefits.

Quote:
All told, the U.S. will probably spend an estimated $1.9 trillion on health care in 2005, $100 billion more than the prior year. That's 15.7% of the gross domestic product. Despite such mammoth sums, hospitals will continue to struggle to stay solvent, employers will continue to face higher insurance premiums, employees will continue to shoulder a higher percentage of those premiums, and insurers -- well, insurers will continue to do very well, thank you, because they get to pass on their higher costs to the policy holders
I can't think of many businesses that could operate with leading edge know how and services like we have in the US healthcare system, yet have the most poorly run administration capabilities standing behind these services.* Seems like a great opportunity for the consulting industry or AARP to latch onto and straigthen out.* When are we going to reach the point with these 15% YOY increases at which time the straw breaks the camels back and something is finally done to cap this fiasco.* If we can get teh whole country and government mobilized to rebuild New Orleans, why can't we get more traction on this potentially more catastrophic issue. If that happens maybe even UncleMick will get himself covered?
__________________
Doing things today that others won't, to do things tomorrow that others can't. Of course I'm referring to workouts, not robbing banks.
DFW_M5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Re: No pension. No health benefits.
Old 09-18-2005, 09:06 AM   #47
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 3,875
Re: No pension. No health benefits.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ex-Jarhead
Probably a generational thing, but I was raised in a small logging town in the Sierras, and you went to see the Dr. if you broke something, or couldn't stop the bleeding.* I know for a fact that my parents never had a physical of any kind.* There was also no vets in town, and if your pet (dog or cat), became deathly ill, it was up to you to put him down, to stop suffering.

I see where Caroline sure does take a lot of tests, and in talking to my daughters (Age 38 and 33), they also get annual physicals.

I have pretty much carried on the tradition of going to the Dr. if you break something, or can't stop the bleeding.* (My kids are on my case about this a lot.)

I tore a a ligament in my knee about 14 years ago, and had to have it repaired.* (Last time I saw a Dr.).

Caroline mentioned that she knew 3 acquaintences that needed heart transplants.* I
have no reason to doubt her, but I'm 69, and have never known anybody personally that had this drastic procedure.


Here is my 2 cents...........I can relate very well to Jarhead's story.
My Dad is 88 and although he is slipping now, he has avoided
doctor's like the plague. He has been in the hospital exactly
once in his life (born at home). He tore up his knee duck hunting.
That's it.

I am more of a hypochondriac myself, but as to annual physicals.................................forget it. I have to be pretty sick
to see a doctor. Unfortunately, that's been the case quite a few
times. Also, I confess if I had super insurance, I would go more often.
In it's absense, I think twice. Not necessarily a bad thing.

JG
__________________
MRGALT2U is offline   Reply With Quote
Re: No pension. No health benefits.
Old 09-18-2005, 09:23 AM   #48
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Eagle43's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: DFW
Posts: 1,883
Re: No pension. No health benefits.

I go, once a year, to get a physical. "Don't point that finger at me", I tell my doc, but he does, every time. I go because DW gripes and bitches until I do. I also read George Sheehan's last book. He was the big jogging guru. He refused to get a physical, because he was in such great shape. He ran marathons well into his 60s. Anyway, he got sick and prostrate cancer was discovered, way too late. Last part of his last book was completed by his daughter. Turns out the guy who had ran thousands of miles could not walk up the steps, at the end. It's just for peace of mind that I go, and peace in the house, too.
__________________
Resist much. Obey Little. . . . Ed Abbey

Disclaimer: My Posts are for my amusement only.
Eagle43 is offline   Reply With Quote
Re: No pension. No health benefits.
Old 09-18-2005, 09:28 AM   #49
Moderator Emeritus
Nords's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Oahu
Posts: 26,620
Re: No pension. No health benefits.

I don't usually chime in on healthcare issues because I hope I'm covered, but BW's rant is over the top. *Where's TH when you have a biased study and hyperextended claims?!? *
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martha
Latest from Business Week on healthcare costs:
[i] All told, the U.S. will probably spend an estimated $1.9 trillion on health care in 2005, $100 billion more than the prior year. That's 15.7% of the gross domestic product.
"A billion here, a billion there, pretty soon you're talking real money." *Gosh, is there something else that we're supposed to be spending that money on? *CEO salaries? *I'm sure the U.S. business/population has spent more on healthcare than we spent getting men to the moon, too, but I don't see any relevance to that comparison either.

When it's their kids lying in the ICU hooked up to a bunch of very expensive medical technology, I suspect people will not care what % of GDP it's costing. *There are some healthcare decisions whose basis does not lie in efficient business practices.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Martha
At some point, and probably in the not-too-distant future, this level of spending will almost certainly become unsustainable. Expensive new drugs and medical technologies, a growing number of uninsured, and an aging, overweight population virtually guarantee cost increases will climb back to the 12% to 13% range in a few years. By 2010, UBS Securities estimates that health care will consume 17.4% of the GDP. "In my view, the pressure is not off costs at all," says William McGeever, a UBS health-care analyst. "I see nothing on the horizon that will moderate increases."
It's either unsustainable or there's no pressure on costs. *These two statements seem to me to be mutually exclusive. *If there's nothing that will moderate increases then it's not so unsustainable, is it?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Martha
All of this might be O.K. if we were getting maximum bang for all those bucks, but we're not. Other industrialized nations, which have universal health coverage, spend less of their GDP on health care -- 8% to 10%. Yet they rank well above the U.S. in average life expectancy and infant mortality rate, standard measures of a nation's health. The U.S. ranks in the bottom quartile of all industrialized nations on those two measures.
I understand that BW is trying to link a lack of govt-provided insurance to infant mortality, but I think that link is tenuous at best. *This factoid appears to neglect the fact that neonatal staffs will tackle just about any pregnancy no matter how grim the prognosis is. *If you're going to take on all the tough cases then you're going to lose a few. *If U.S. infant mortality was such a problem then you would think that the parents of kids in the neonatal ICU would be campaigning to ship their offspring to the #1 country for low infant mortality. *But I suspect that the healthcare systems in that country don't have anywhere near the resources or the track record that the U.S. has with keeping babies alive.

Here's a sports analogy-- in their early careers, baseball shortstops dive for all the impossible catches and make quite a few of them. *But they also miss a lot of them and get dinged with errors. *Later in their careers, most shortstops have learned not to dive for the impossible catches-- they pass up the chance to make the big play but, more importantly to their statistics, they don't miss it and they don't get dinged with an error.

Is this the behavior we want to encourage? *"Sorry, folks, but we have a very low infant mortality rate in this hospital and we don't want to mess it up with the risk of losing your kid. *Besides saving your kid's life would be a very inefficient application of valuable GDP resources and we want to get the most bang for our insurer's bucks. *But if you go down the road to General Hospital, I hear that they'll admit anyone."

(Note that I wrote the last three paragraphs without ever once introducing the highly emotional evocation of the words "crack babies".) *

Quote:
Originally Posted by MRGALT2U
The annual "check ups/tests" are out, but they would be even if I had full coverage. *IMHO, if they look long enough, they will find something and it will be expensive.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ex-Jarhead
I have pretty much carried on the tradition of going to the Dr. if you break something, or can't stop the bleeding. *(My kids are on my case about this a lot.)
At the risk of lumping JG & Jarhead into the same category (sorry, Jarhead), are you guys both members of the same "blissfully ignorant" club?!?

Here's a sea story: *Boomer submarines used to get very little personal message traffic for the crew (low bandwidth in the 1980s comm systems). *One day the CO got a message from the parents of a sailor: *"Petty Officer's grandmother is desperately ill and could die before the end of your patrol. *But we don't want to disrupt his job/career with a humanitarian evacuation and we don't want him to worry about her. *Please don't tell him about this until we decide whether or not to ask for a humevac."

Of course the CO immediately sent for the sailor and said "Your parents don't want you to know that I'm telling you this." *He felt that the guy would want to know, would rather be with his grandmother than be working on the sub, and would be praying like crazy for his grandmother's recovery. *Sure, he'd be worrying, but it would be the constructive kind instead of an unexpected trauma magnified by the fact that no one felt he could handle the knowledge. The sailor strongly believed in the power of prayer and was very happy that the CO had told him the news so that he could get right to work with his God.

I'm no medical junkie but I go in for annual exams and all reasonable tests. *("Reasonable" means "If I had the information this test could provide, would I change my behavior?") *If there's a problem then I wanna know about it, and I think that I'm mature enough to handle the facts. *I would hate to think that avoidance of medical technology would end up blindsiding me with a terminal condition that I could have worked on or even avoided with a warning.

Jarhead, my father used to have your medical philosphy. *One day he went to the doctor-- his first visit in a decade-- to ask about a dry patch of skin on his leg that'd been bothering him for a couple YEARS. *It turned out to be no big deal but the "routine blood tests" revealed that his diet was overloaded with sodium and his prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was off the chart. *Now he controls his blood pressure with his diet, and his aggressively cancerous prostate was removed literally a couple months before it would have metastasized the cancer to the rest of his body. *

So now he happily shows up for annual physical exams. *And I do too.
__________________
*
*

The book written on E-R.org, "The Military Guide to Financial Independence and Retirement", on sale now! For more info see "About Me" in my profile.
I don't spend much time here anymore, so please send me a PM. Thanks.
Nords is offline   Reply With Quote
Re: No pension. No health benefits.
Old 09-18-2005, 09:38 AM   #50
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 2,083
Re: No pension. No health benefits.

Because I was told that it was advisable to have a full annual checkup after the age of 50, I have been taking one the last 5 years. It has cost me under $250 so it was very offerable especially with a salary coming in. Now that I have ER'd, when my cobra benefits expire in 18 months or I go to a high deductable policy (in a different state), I may rething this, since the total cost of over $1k would come out of my pocket. At the age of 57+, I am still in terrific physical shape.

I'm off to a fast 22 27 mile bicycle workout before brunch.

MJ
__________________
I look to the present moment because that's where I live my life.
MJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Re: No pension. No health benefits.
Old 09-18-2005, 09:42 AM   #51
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 408
Re: No pension. No health benefits.

We have a high deductable insurance (BCBS IA) and we are all in good health. Premiums for family run $304, per month. Each family member gets a $500 credit to use towards a routine phyical or minor problem resolved in doctor's office.
__________________
LovesLife is offline   Reply With Quote
Re: No pension. No health benefits.
Old 09-18-2005, 09:47 AM   #52
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso) Give me a forum ...
REWahoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Texas Hill Country
Posts: 42,149
Re: No pension. No health benefits.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ
At the age of 57+, I am still in terrific physical shape.
Translation: I will be a fine looking corpse...

__________________
Numbers is hard

When I hit 70, it hit back

Retired in 2005 at age 58, no pension
REWahoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Re: No pension. No health benefits.
Old 09-18-2005, 11:13 AM   #53
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,375
Re: No pension. No health benefits.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nords

At the risk of lumping JG & Jarhead into the same category (sorry, Jarhead), are you guys both members of the same "blissfully ignorant" club?!?

Nords: I knew the minute that I clicked on the post button, two things would happen in the A.M. The sun would come up, and Nords would
reply with a couple of analogys, and an insulting remark or two. (Incidentally, glad to hear your fathers alright).
Regarding being "blissfully" ignorant. Not possible at my age. (At least the "blissfully" part.)
While I don't take the hard line "Christian Science" approach to health. (Basically no doctor approach), I have tried to show personal responsibility for my own health. (Staying physically active, watching weight, blah, blah, blah).
In any case, I wasn't endorsing, or recommending that anyone follow my approach.
In my opinion, our society at large, is over-medicated, over-tested, over-doctored, and the health care costs seem to bear that out.
Oh, and by the way, I've never had a "flu" shot .
Well, Nords, nice chatting with you, but have a 10:00 tee off time, so have to run.

P.S. You're going to be a real "pain in -ss", when you're my age.

Regards, Jarhead

__________________
Jarhead* is offline   Reply With Quote
Re: No pension. No health benefits.
Old 09-18-2005, 12:30 PM   #54
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 2,083
Re: No pension. No health benefits.

Quote:
Originally Posted by REWahoo!
Translation: I will be a fine looking corpse...
REW, I wasn't talking about my physical appearance. Most people look at my face and think I'm 75.
I hope to be around when you announce your grand grand children's wedding on this forum. This afternoon, I'm taking my 94 1/2 yo father to a family wedding.

Maybe he's waiting for me the finally get married but I have to find the future Mrs.MJ, 1st. I'll be in Thailand at the end of October. I might bring back my Mrs. 18 yo true love . That should really send him packing.

MJ
__________________
I look to the present moment because that's where I live my life.
MJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Re: No pension. No health benefits.
Old 09-18-2005, 05:25 PM   #55
Moderator Emeritus
Nords's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Oahu
Posts: 26,620
Re: No pension. No health benefits.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ
This afternoon, I'm taking my 94 1/2 yo father to a family wedding.
That's even more impressive than Tony Randall's marital record!
__________________
*
*

The book written on E-R.org, "The Military Guide to Financial Independence and Retirement", on sale now! For more info see "About Me" in my profile.
I don't spend much time here anymore, so please send me a PM. Thanks.
Nords is offline   Reply With Quote
Re: No pension. No health benefits.
Old 09-18-2005, 05:31 PM   #56
Moderator Emeritus
Nords's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Oahu
Posts: 26,620
Re: No pension. No health benefits.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ex-Jarhead
Oh, and by the way, I've never had a "flu" shot .
Yikes! Judging by my medical record, flu or pneumonia will be my death. It'd be interesting to see if you still feel that way about flu shots after reading The Great Influenza.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ex-Jarhead
P.S. You're going to be a real "pain in -ss", when you're my age.
We're gonna have to compare notes again in another couple decades, but my spouse says that she thinks I'm getting a head start on that. She's really glad that you guys occupy so much of my attention so that she doesn't have to...
__________________
*
*

The book written on E-R.org, "The Military Guide to Financial Independence and Retirement", on sale now! For more info see "About Me" in my profile.
I don't spend much time here anymore, so please send me a PM. Thanks.
Nords is offline   Reply With Quote
Re: No pension. No health benefits.
Old 09-18-2005, 08:37 PM   #57
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 3,875
Re: No pension. No health benefits.

Jeez, Nords really went on a tear. Like Jarhead, I have never had
a flu shot either, and don't intend to in the future. I did get the flu
in the winter of 03\04 and truly thought I might die (DW points out
that I often think it's the end but it's a false alarm). Anyway, Jarhead and I have already lived quite a long time,
and there are a few folks (not here I hope) that think I have
already overstayed my welcome.

JG
__________________
MRGALT2U is offline   Reply With Quote
Re: No pension. No health benefits.
Old 09-18-2005, 11:17 PM   #58
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Minnehaha
Posts: 2,375
Re: No pension. No health benefits.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter
Don't know what the percentage is, but it happened to me. My wife was diagnosed with cancer in 1984, and treatment costs topped $2MM by the time she died in 1997. The last 12 months alone were in excess of $1MM.
Peter - you and your wife went through so much - I was really touched by your post.


I have 10,000 deductible with 100% coverage over that. There is normally at least a 20% discounting of the bill by BCBS. The out of pocket and premiums are below what I would pay just for the premiums of a standard policy. I am fortunate to have the resources to cover the 10,000 deduct. Did cobra for the first 18 months and had to go through the hassle and uncertainity of having 5 people reviewed and approved by underwriters with comebacks for more info all the while watching the cobra clock wind down. It was a lot easier working for a corp. and getting health ins automatically....
__________________
MinnesotaEats - www.goodfoodmsp.com
Danny is offline   Reply With Quote
Re: No pension. No health benefits.
Old 09-19-2005, 12:23 AM   #59
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Mesa
Posts: 3,588
Re: No pension. No health benefits.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MRGALT2U
. . .Like Jarhead, I have never had
a flu shot either, and don't intend to in the future.* . . .
I got a flu shot once -- the only year that I actually got the flu. From what I've read, flu shots are about as likely to hurt as to help.
__________________
sgeeeee is offline   Reply With Quote
Re: No pension. No health benefits.
Old 09-19-2005, 12:42 AM   #60
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 2,083
Re: No pension. No health benefits.

Don't remember if I ever got a flu shot as a kid but have never had one as an adult. About 3 years ago, I did get the flu. All I took was oscillococcinum, a homeopathic flu remedy and to relieve my discomfort I took a tylenol at night.

MJ
__________________

__________________
I look to the present moment because that's where I live my life.
MJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
FIRE Now vs. Working to Obtain Health Insurance Benefits GMueller FIRE and Money 23 12-07-2006 03:30 PM
Social Security Spousal Benefit Elderdude FIRE and Money 52 06-30-2006 08:55 AM
Wal-mart wants to help end the health insurance crisis! maddythebeagle FIRE and Money 2 04-20-2006 07:16 AM
Hope for those who likely will have no pension? Susan Powell Young Dreamers 31 04-04-2004 05:43 PM
Annuity vs Lump Sum Pension moguls FIRE and Money 5 05-26-2003 03:09 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:35 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.