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Old 08-22-2014, 08:24 AM   #21
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I wouldn't go back to work for all the tea in China. It will be ten years soon and I still smile when I watch commuters coming and going. I am blessed to have a good pension backstopping essentials. But if the market ever blasts away the other legs of my ER stool I will be consulting the frugal crew on this board on the appropriate life style adjustments to keep me far away from work.
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Old 08-22-2014, 08:24 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by 2B View Post
That's somewhat my problem that has led to my OMY life. I can't believe how much I get paid for doing very little, with lots of vacation time, flexible hours and no stress. My only problems are I have to be physically present at work and DW decided after her father finally passed away that we needed to live closer to DD and a handful of grandkids. I now have a nominal 1 hr commute each way. If I could telecommute, I might be lured into part-time after my planned January 2015 retirement.
Same here, when my time came management offered up the telecommute option, and I took it. I didn't think it would work very well, but they persuaded me to give it a try, and I must say it's better than I expected. This may be because the nature of my work is well suited to it, all I need is a notebook computer and a fast internet connection. I'm getting about the same output while putting in far fewer work hours. Management seems thrilled that this change cured my habit of blowing off meetings, now that I don't see my co-workers very often I actually look forward to web conferences.
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Old 08-22-2014, 09:03 AM   #23
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Same here, when my time came management offered up the telecommute option, and I took it. I didn't think it would work very well, but they persuaded me to give it a try, and I must say it's better than I expected. This may be because the nature of my work is well suited to it, all I need is a notebook computer and a fast internet connection. I'm getting about the same output while putting in far fewer work hours. Management seems thrilled that this change cured my habit of blowing off meetings, now that I don't see my co-workers very often I actually look forward to web conferences.
Back in 2001-2003, I had a mostly telecommuting, part-time work arrangement which went well until the company pulled the plug on all open-ended telecommuting. I knew it would be my eventual undoing because it brought back the horrors of the hour+ commute I so despised. Five years later, to the day the telecommuting ended, I ERed. In my exit interview, I told the HR flunkie that the main reason I was leaving was because of the commute and the company's end of open-ended telecommuting. That being said, even if they offered it back to me, I would have turned it down because going to the office even one day a week was too often!
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Old 08-22-2014, 09:04 AM   #24
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Since my entire job centers around relationships with customers, once I quit it's all over. No way I would want to start over with a new employer. There is no way at this stage of the game I could make half what I do today with a minimal amount of effort.
This is probably the greatest reason why I'm stuck in OMY syndrome. The FI part was much more direct and absolute than the RE part of FIRE for me. Hopefully I'm making progress and will be reasonably confident enough to take the leap by early '16.
This equals me to a T. It'd be a one way street for me as well. It sucks not being able to take time off but the golden (well, gold plated anyway) handcuffs keep me sticking around. Also, after owning my own company for 11 years and reporting to no one, the idea of someday having to go back to work and report to some Other idiot other than me makes me shudder.

Mind you, I got driven to and from the Toyota dealership this week in their courtesy shuttles. Both driven by old retired guys who do four shifts of 4 hours a week. They enjoy driving around, talking to people and getting to drive the new types of vehicles every year. Not my bag at all but I guess there are opportunities if your plans don't quite work out.
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Old 08-22-2014, 09:08 AM   #25
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NO NO NO NO NO NO NO.

The best hour of my week is 530-630am on Monday morning, when the people drive by on their way to work while I'm having a leisurely cup of coffee.....and watching out the window while in my robe!

The second best hour(s).....Sunday afternoon/evening when my stomach is NOT in knots anticipating Monday morning....60 minutes ticking clock don't scare me now!
My favorite hour of the week (day?) now is between 8 AM and 9 AM because that was the hour I spent trying to get ready to catch the train to go to work. It usually included racing around and trying to force myself to eat breakfast while still groggy, often making myself a little nauseous by the time I was done running for said train. Since I ERed, I don't have to do much of anything except watch TV and do stuff on the PC before starting to eat breakfast at 9 AM, a better hour for me to have a very leisurely breakfast.

Sadly, I am often awake at 5:30 AM because I have to pee. But I can go back to sleep and not have t worry about oversleeping the alarm clock cuz I don't need to use one any more LOL!
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Old 08-22-2014, 10:11 AM   #26
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Disagree with article's general perspective, and think most data do not support it. According to gov't (BLS), the US participation rate for 55+ (and every age sub-category) has been INcreasing over past 20+ years while that of younger groups has been progressively DEcreasing.
Civilian labor force participation rates by age, sex, race, and ethnicity

Not sure if 55+ crowd can't retire or just won't, but data show this is NOT an issue unique to the present economic "recovery". Are more and more older Americans working longer (& paying more taxes) so their adult kids can hang out and scrape by on the dole? If the BLS stats do represent a lesser work ethic amongst the upcoming generation(s), then the best of times may be in the rearview mirror
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Old 08-22-2014, 07:40 PM   #27
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ER Hoosier. Excellent perspective and thought reference this being a younger generation issue. Perhaps it's too much economic outpatient care (to quote Thomas Stanley )
http://www.thomasjstanley.com/blog-a...ient_Care.html
Boomers spent down their retirement looking after failure-to-launch offspring instead of looking after themselves. Plausible theory.
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Old 08-22-2014, 08:40 PM   #28
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....Boomers spent down their retirement looking after failure-to-launch offspring instead of looking after themselves. Plausible theory.
With widespread anecdotal support amongst my family & friends
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Old 08-22-2014, 08:51 PM   #29
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I retired. Now I'm ready to go back to work: Poll Retirees go back to work?

One in three people retired say they would return to work if the job market improved .... Not talking part time Walmart greeter ...but really getting back to the grindstone ...

Is this really just a case of a bunch of boomers generation having been laid off during the recession and being woefully ill prepared for retirement (financially )and really needing to go back to work - but too embarrassed to admit they were never really truly retired? "I'll just tell the neighbors that I retired at 54 rather than admit out of work for 3+ years" ?

It will be interesting to measure the upcoming droves and droves of people who SHOULD be retired or retiring .... But can't. And so stay in the work force ...

Interesting stuff - what are the longer term implications to the economy ? When many youth are unemployed they riot. What happens when many pre-seniors are unemployed? They vote .... ? They

Just curious of opinions.

Unemployed youth in Europe may riot, but not in the USA. Here they just move into a friend or relatives basement and play xbox or play station for another 5 years somewhat like a long hibernation period until things improve.


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One in three not really REALLY retired ...
Old 08-22-2014, 08:51 PM   #30
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One in three not really REALLY retired ...

Thought it was interesting how the Fed decided to remove those they decided really didn't want to work anymore so that they could show improved unemployment numbers. Now they are saying that, wait, these people really did want to work and may be reentering the work force (slack). Have your cake an eat it too. Never any bad news from this Fed. It's all going to be ok.


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Old 08-22-2014, 08:53 PM   #31
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I think I read during the recession that more people than expected were filing for SS at age 62 because they lost their jobs and couldn't find another. I'm sure many would prefer to be back at work but for most, it won't happen. Some have obsolete skills, sometimes the company closed, and there's always good old age discrimination.

I first thought of going back to work PT after retirement; a friend had told me that her employer , a large mutual fund company, hired part-timers to handle calls from its 401(k) clients. Then I got used to leisure. This week I started a Geology class and I love it. It's just enough structure for my life now. Plenty to learn after that!
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Old 08-23-2014, 07:55 AM   #32
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Another point not considered...A whole new industry and class of people have been created since 2008 of retired people but not really retired. When the unemployment benefits ended for all those people, many just managed to get a disability by going to the right doctors and having the right ailments. The Social Security Disability program has allowed many to retire early...but not really retire nor have to work anymore.
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Old 08-24-2014, 01:02 PM   #33
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No, left at 59 and that was it. No time. We will be travelling for the next five out of seven months. Cannot fit work into our schedule even if we wanted to. We figure we have 10-12 years of independent land travel left. Hopefully we will have more than that but why take the chance. The salt is running down on our timer. Our list is long. Returning to work would not be on that list.
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Old 08-24-2014, 01:34 PM   #34
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For myself, I'm semi-retiring in 9 months and then will teach 4 on-line courses per year, versus the 50-60 hours/week I've been doing for the last 25 years. I call it retirement (or easing my legs into the chilly retirement water), you can call it non-retirement.
I qualify now at 56 for medical benefits and could pull from the 403-b since I meet the retirement requirements. But we plan to move to the PNW and my younger DW will work a few years more so will be job-searching.

I don't think I'm quite ready to go cold-turkey and in fact would like to see the portfolio experience a blow before we both cut the traces. In a few more years when she qualifies for a 72t, we could survive easily a loss of her job and my going full retard, so easing in slowly seems best, for us. (YMWV-- your mileage will vary.)
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Old 08-24-2014, 01:36 PM   #35
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I can't see myself gearing up for a "job!" I do wake up at 5:30-ish am, and enjoy the first cup of coffee on the porch witnessing the emergent dawn with the kitties. For 14 years it has been this way, and I would rather cut back than to give this up. And, then there is meditation and a walk...priceless. Thanks to you all and the Bogleheads we are able to do pretty much as we please!
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Old 08-25-2014, 12:03 AM   #36
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I quit January 15 now I can't see ever going to work again, I threw away my work clothes.

Now my boyfriend wants to quit working, he said he will call to see if the work he doesn't hate is available and only go those days. I told him it won't work he will start hoping there isn't work then stop calling. He moved to riverfront last fall, got a new boat, has yard work to do, really no time to work. He might get some chickens they would get lonely if he went to work. If he quits he gets a pension but can't work ever again so working part time means no pension checks. He is union and kinda waiting for a new contract they have been without contract over a month and a new contract might mean bigger pension. His commute is almost 100 miles each way, he hates commute and will save money on gas if he retires. I can't see him wanting part time, if he works 800 hours a year he gets medical and for 1000 hours get an extra year in the pension plan but he worked enough this year already. He didn't go to work last week at all, don't know if he will go this week either so no pay and no pension because he doesn't want to go.
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Old 08-27-2014, 12:47 PM   #37
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I don't know you'll ever be able to tell what portion of "retired" people are really closet unemployed. Probably falls into the same category as "Consultant" and even moreso "Day Trader".

The reason it won't be obvious is because, at least by my definition, you can certainly work and be retired. In my mind you're not retired if you have to work some mandatory amount to pay the bills and you have to heavily weigh how much you're paid when choosing your work. Alternately if you only work to do what you want, as much as you want and the income is "beer money" I'd agree you're still pretty retired by any reasonable standard.

All of the above may even be too judgmental. I suppose at the end of the day, if you feel retired, you are :-) Who am I to tell you.
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Old 08-27-2014, 01:00 PM   #38
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No way could I go back to w*rk. Since, FIRE'ing the only time I considered this was during the financial meltdown seeing the the huge paper losses. Then after those 10 seconds of considering, I got off the ledge and asked myself what was I thinking

I wanted years ago, to once hanging it up to walk away for good. That's why it's called retirement
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Old 08-27-2014, 01:59 PM   #39
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I retired two years ago Feb. I lasted a year and decided I needed to do something.
I went out and got my RE License. I now work about 10 hours per week and make a little extra cash I don't need but I'm having fun.
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Old 08-27-2014, 02:12 PM   #40
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I was retired about a year when 2 separate head-hunters contacted me about a Claims Director position......a job I would have eagerly sought if I was still in the workforce. I did have more than a moment's thought about pursuing it.
But it then occurred to me: "Hmmm, I bet if I got it they'd actually expect me to work." That sealed it for me that I was 100% happy in this retired lifestyle.
[disclaimer as always: I technically work 2 days/week from home for my old employer, but if you saw what I got paid for you wouldn't call it work!]
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