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Old 07-10-2019, 08:39 AM   #121
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Mom and Dad, your wonderful FA and your financial success so far has reinforced our decision to FIRE and move on with our lives as well. Thank you for the encouraging example! We are so glad your timing has set you up for your future years. Congratulations!
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Old 07-10-2019, 10:07 AM   #122
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"we are spending our money as fast as we can so you won't inhere anything, if you are counting on that for your early retirement"
That makes perfect sense to me. Why should somebody's parents deny themselves pleasure in retirement so their kids can retire decades before the parents were able to retire? I can't think of one good reason.
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Old 07-10-2019, 10:19 AM   #123
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Let it go.

Why torture yourselves with the constant discussion and angst?

Move forward with your lives. There is nothing in the rear view mirror for you.
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Old 07-10-2019, 11:03 AM   #124
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That makes perfect sense to me. Why should somebody's parents deny themselves pleasure in retirement so their kids can retire decades before the parents were able to retire? I can't think of one good reason.
I agree. The in-laws shouldn't deny themselves to leave a larger inheritance. If OP's ER is dependent on getting an inheritance, I didn't catch it. This could be a concern of the in-laws, although maybe poorly worded. The main concern of OP seems to be that the in-laws will run out of money before the in-laws run out of time, and then OP feels there is an obligation to financially support the in-laws. Of course, there could be a lot of vital info missing from this whole picture. One side of the story, and all that.
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Old 07-10-2019, 11:15 AM   #125
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I have been thinking about this thread for several days and in light of the OP's followup post, I am inclined to give the parents the benefit of the doubt. I try to put myself in their shoes. If my child and her spouse told me they were going to retire early, I would be naturally concerned that their plan be realistic. I think any plan that relies on an inheritance ipso facto is not realistic. There are many things that could happen before any inheritance comes to fruition. I would also find it presumptuous. I would want to ask, but it is a delicate question, so I would probably go with a humorous approach -- something exactly like "I hope your plan doesn't rely on inheriting anything, because your mother and I are spending our money as fast as we can." It is a way to broach the subject and give a subtle warning. It is not, however, a signal that I expect my child to take care of me later. At least, I surely would not have intended it that way.

I would just let it go, but if you can't, I would approach the parents and ask them something like this -- "I am really thinking hard about our last conversation. I want to make double sure that we are ready. You guys seem to have your ducks in a row. Could I show you our plan and get your input?" Then you show them your plan, which I am assuming does not contemplate any inheritance. That assuages their concern, flatters them a little and, I think, will allow you to find out if they really do expect your eventual financial support. If they don't, all is good. If they do, you can worry about it at that point. In my view, you do not have sufficient information right now to warrant all the agita.
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Old 07-10-2019, 12:02 PM   #126
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Wow I never realized how lucky to have the wonderful parents I had until I came here.

Parents don't want to help the kids. kids don't want to help the parents.

lovely family
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Old 07-10-2019, 12:08 PM   #127
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Wow I never realized how lucky to have the wonderful parents I had until I came here.

Parents don't want to help the kids. kids don't want to help the parents.

lovely family
It is about how much should we plan to provide given our own ER timeline, and that parents are much more than well-off than the kids. We care about our parents hence the question.
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Old 07-10-2019, 12:25 PM   #128
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Based on what the OP quoted from his MIL in post #110, It sounds like MIL thinks his plan depends on inheriting something from them. That bothered her in the same way her comments bother him. She's saying she and FIL did not accumulate the assets they did so the kids could quit work early and wait around to inherit their money to retire on.

Might be time for a pleasant conversation about early retirement and how it works. Without giving numbers, in the OP's shoes, I would explain that he and their DD have LBTM to accumulate more early on and that financial planning tools relying on history to estimate safe withdrawal rates show that he and their DD will have plenty to see them through life at an expense level that makes them happy. The OP and their DD do not expect or in any way rely on an inheritance to fund their expenses.

And then pour another martini.
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Old 07-10-2019, 12:31 PM   #129
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It is about how much should we plan to provide given our own ER timeline, and that parents are much more than well-off than the kids. We care about our parents hence the question.
then why do you say they are resentful?? NOw I admit, I only read the first post but it doesn't sound like they are resentful. It sounds like you have issues.

How do you know they do stuff to "impress their friends"? what's wrong with how they live if they can afford it?

Did they ask you to "provide" any thing? maybe they aren't expecting to live longer than 20 years? if you are in your 40s I would say they are in their 60's maybe they don't think they will make it past 80.

You are making a lot of assumptions that may or may not come to pass.
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Old 07-10-2019, 12:34 PM   #130
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Based on what the OP quoted from his MIL in post #110, It sounds like MIL thinks his plan depends on inheriting something from them. That bothered her in the same way her comments bother him. She's saying she and FIL did not accumulate the assets they did so the kids could quit work early and wait around to inherit their money to retire on.

Might be time for a pleasant conversation about early retirement and how it works. Without giving numbers, in the OP's shoes, I would explain that he and their DD have LBTM to accumulate more early on and that financial planning tools relying on history to estimate safe withdrawal rates show that he and their DD will have plenty to see them through life at an expense level that makes them happy. The OP and their DD do not expect or in any way rely on an inheritance to fund their expenses.

And then pour another martini.
we'll take your advice and pour another martini, but we've concluded with all the helpful comments, that we'll just drop this and continue on with our own plan. We've hit the common FIRE target a few years ago, but since we are going to be relying on ourselves for many decades, we decided to set the target higher, like 60 times our annual expenses. We are also holding off because the risk of a near term recession and uncertainty around ACA. We hope in a couple years there will be more certainties.
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Old 07-10-2019, 12:39 PM   #131
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we'll take your advice and pour another martini, but we've concluded with all the helpful comments, that we'll just drop this and continue on with our own plan. We've hit the common FIRE target a few years ago, but since we are going to be relying on ourselves for many decade, we decided to set the target higher, like 60 times our annual expenses. We are also holding off because the risk of a near term recession and uncertainty around ACA. We hope in a couple years there will be more certainties.
Now this sounds like a much better plan than worrying about something that coulda, woulda, maybe, might not involve you.

Congratulations on hitting some milestones.
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Old 07-10-2019, 12:44 PM   #132
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then why do you say they are resentful?? NOw I admit, I only read the first post but it doesn't sound like they are resentful. It sounds like you have issues.

How do you know they do stuff to "impress their friends"? what's wrong with how they live if they can afford it?

Did they ask you to "provide" any thing? maybe they aren't expecting to live longer than 20 years? if you are in your 40s I would say they are in their 60's maybe they don't think they will make it past 80.

You are making a lot of assumptions that may or may not come to pass.
I'm not gonna quote every single thing they said over the years but I'm describing what I sensed over those years. I'm also not going to disclose more personal details than necessary. There's no point of picking on my words, because I'm not gonna write a thesis to prove my point, I'm here to ask for advice and thankfully, I got plenty helps already.
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Old 07-10-2019, 01:20 PM   #133
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It sounds like there's a lot of family dynamic most of us can only guess at going on here. You've gotten the general advice loud and clear, but I would think this needs a long chat first with your spouse, then, maybe with your inlaws.
I think you have made an excellent (probably the BEST) point. This isn't about the money. This isn't about "retirement". This is about parents wanting to continue being parents long after their job of parenting is OVER. We often hear that parents want their kids to be better off than they were, and this is true in many cases. BUT...in some cases, I don't think this is the case.

The dynamic of parent/child relationship should change as the child grows into an adult. The parent needs to STOP being the parent. This is not to say that they can't throw in their .02 about things they have experienced or dealt with..but STOP trying to control their kids. And so I think this is at play to an extent here. My MIL does this somewhat with two of her kids (not with DW, thankfully) and it's interesting to watch.

Bottom line here...you are all grown ass adults, so live your lives. Let them spend like mad, and retire if you like. If they don't like it, then let 'em deal with it.
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Old 07-10-2019, 04:34 PM   #134
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I think you have made an excellent (probably the BEST) point. This isn't about the money. This isn't about "retirement". This is about parents wanting to continue being parents long after their job of parenting is OVER. We often hear that parents want their kids to be better off than they were, and this is true in many cases. BUT...in some cases, I don't think this is the case.

The dynamic of parent/child relationship should change as the child grows into an adult. The parent needs to STOP being the parent. This is not to say that they can't throw in their .02 about things they have experienced or dealt with..but STOP trying to control their kids. And so I think this is at play to an extent here. My MIL does this somewhat with two of her kids (not with DW, thankfully) and it's interesting to watch.

Bottom line here...you are all grown ass adults, so live your lives. Let them spend like mad, and retire if you like. If they don't like it, then let 'em deal with it.

Thanks ExFlyboy5 for saying almost word for word what I would suggest the OP do. Live your life and let your PIL live theirs. I assume you are both on the same page with this.
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Old 07-10-2019, 11:02 PM   #135
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That makes perfect sense to me. Why should somebody's parents deny themselves pleasure in retirement so their kids can retire decades before the parents were able to retire? I can't think of one good reason.
I agree.

But here's what I have an issue with. I'm guessing the OP is living pretty frugally to enable an early retirement, and once retired will continue that lifestyle. Nothing wrong with the parents blowing their dough as big spenders. However, fast forward 20 years if the parents needed financial help, that would really bother me. It just seems very unfair (to me), if that's how things ended up.
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Old 07-10-2019, 11:13 PM   #136
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i have no idea ...

father died in 1969

mother died in 2007

and i didn't start my retirement planning until 2010

so without the theatrics on a seance ....

maybe they are proud and maybe not ( and since i was always the black sheep do i really care )
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Old 07-11-2019, 06:06 AM   #137
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Here's the truth about human nature. When it comes to work culture, people cannot stand when someone else does something they havent done themselves.

Not sure when OP's parents retired, lets say 60. If OP wants to retire at 45...they have a 15 year head start to do whatever they feel like doing. Naturally, the parents hate that idea since they didnt choose to do that themselves. Maybe a jealous thing?

Its pretty obvious, the fact that they said they're going to spend every penny so don't count on an inheritance. They sound like petty children. They're just jealous, thats all. They cant help it.
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Old 07-14-2019, 11:06 AM   #138
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After some thought about this, I've decided the parents aren't villains or financially stupid, at least based on what's been posted. They're just parents seeing the kids following a different path in life which is worrisome to them. And worry often leads to clumsy, not thought out communications and hurt feelings.

1. Kids have decided to RE and live with a smaller income than if they continued to work because the RE life style appeals to them and it's their choice.

2. Parents are concerned and don't want to give up any of their retirement lifestyle to possibly bail out the kids if the kids have miscalculated or aren't satisfied with the lifestyle after some time. So they let the kids know they're spending their significant stash to enjoy life without undue concern for leaving an inheritance.

3. The kids seem to know what they're doing regarding FIRE so the parents concerns are likely unfounded and over the next few years this should play out.

3. The parents seem to be in pretty good shape financially. They are in their 60's and their FA projects they might run out of money in 20 years if the current high level of spending continues. Doesn't sound like that much of a high risk situation to me since they'll be in their 80's if they do hit the bottom of the money bucket and they may have (no detail given by OP) ongoing sources of income such as SS, pension or annuity to help out if/after the portfolio is gone. Plus, since their current spending level includes a lot of discretionary spending, the budget could likely be painlessly tightened as they enter their late 70's and go into the slow-down 80's. I mean, what is the big worry? I wish my parents or the in laws would have been in that good a financial position late in life.

The issue seems to be hurt feelings and clumsy (at best) communication. OP is dramatically over-reacting. OP, realize your decision to FIRE and lead a lifestyle far different than your parents will take a while for them to be comfortable with. In the meantime, play your FIRE plans and new lifestyle in a low key manner. Don't expect them to enthusiastically embrace it any more than you embrace their current lifestyle and spending decisions.

You don't need or want an inheritance from them, so that's no issue. And as far as needing to support them in the distant future, what would you do differently if they started living a frugal lifestyle and their FA changed his tune to "they'll never run out of money." Likely nothing. So don't worry about it. It'll be years before it's known whether they have the life span and energy to continue this for 20 years (doubtful) and more than likely adjustments will be made along the way.

What you should do is be totally supportive and accepting of their lifestyle and spending decisions and let them know that. Cheer them on as they leave for one of their expensive international trips or have the house re-decorated yet again. And lead your own life as you wish reassuring them that you'll be fine and that FIRE suits you two well despite reduced spending levels. More than likely, they'll eventually become comfortable with that.

It'll work out. Don't make it any more of a drama than it has to be.
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Old Today, 03:43 PM   #139
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From my experience, when I told my Parents I was going to fully retire at 43, I ended up supporting my mother in one of my houses. It became a nightmare. All she did was complain about everything. She made my life a living hell, to where I one day snapped and said **** it! Sorry for the language, but, I had enough of supporting her. Thank God, the house sold, she bought her own, and I can honestly say:

Mom, I will love you from a distance!

Over the course of 10 months the house and her sucked about $30K out of me. There was no end in site, until the house sold. It was like a dark cloud was lifted off of me and my life literally turned around the day after.

The worst part is (which is not all bad), I took a 18-24 month contract, which was to rebuild my lost wealth. But, I really enjoy the company I work for and I’m no longer an executive, I’m in a much lower job, and I have to say... I love it!!!!

I’m also paying down debt that I was willing to carry going into ER, before my parent situation happened.

I’m also saving for my BAB (which the wife approved of) Big *** Boat! But, that’s subjective. So it will be BAB to me, as I have no boat currently. :-)

Best of luck with your decision, from my experience, I should have kept my mouth closed and not told anyone my plans.
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Old Today, 04:07 PM   #140
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Hi I'm new to the forum and I hope to get some suggestions on our situation.

We are DINK couple in our early 40s with no kids. We both work full time and have been planning to retire in the near future. We have accumulated significant amount of investments (45 times of our annual spending), and we have no mortgage or other debt. We track every dollar we earn and spend for over a decade and live well below our means. We both have stressful jobs and we've been counting towards the day we leave the daily grind behind.

We have told our parents about our plan, and they laughed at us first, then recently they told us they are spending their money as fast as they can so we won't inhere anything from them if we retire early, which we are not planning to anyway. However, they also told us they are spending at least ten thousand dollars monthly on average, and their financial adviser projected them to run out of money in 20 years. they suggest that if we can't afford to spend ten thousand dollars a month in retirement, we are not ready to retire.

They travel many times a year domestically and internationally, often on luxury tours to exotic places with their much wealthier friends. They dine out more often than eating at home, go to all sorts of expensive events and parties, and spend frivolously on stuff they already have, just to impress their friends.


My concern is that they would overspend their wealth and will have to count on us to support them later on, and we will have to go back to work when we are in our 60s to do that. It just doesn't seem fair that we would live a frugal lifestyle and have to pay for their exorbitant lifestyle.
They have made it clear they are not watching their finances and want to spend it all. Perhaps beyond just telling them they will be on their own (which they will be) ask about their financial plans? Do they have long term care insurance, perhaps an annuity that pays until they die or a paid for whole life policy so the surviving spouse will be taken care of. Also have they maximized their Social Security?

Not your job to support them but perhaps to be the adult and make sure they are protecting themselves? There often comes a time when the children become the parents whether through physical or mental decline. Doing some pre-planning for that possibility/eventuality will save you all money and a mountain of grief and heartache in the future.

No idea of your parents financial status but sounds like they did okay. Time may come when selling their home will be required to support them but talk to estate lawyers and you may find that letting their estate sell it will be far more advantageous, even if you need to kick in to cover some of their expenses. For which you can be paid interest from the estate, (even if just the property) on the ongoing outlays you might have to make.

As to the 10k a month, I rather agree with that but we love to travel, have 2 homes, and while we donít give a damn about showing off to our neighbors we are determined to enjoy the heck out of early retirement. Fully expect later retirement will be cheaper and less fun!

Best of luck
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