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View Poll Results: How do you pay for unexpected expenses?
Use Savings 92 85.98%
Reduce Spending 7 6.54%
Use Credit Card 7 6.54%
Borrow from family/friends 1 0.93%
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Poll:How to pay for Unexpected expenses?
Old 01-20-2016, 02:10 PM   #1
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Poll:How to pay for Unexpected expenses?

After reading this article I wondered if this group would score differently than the survey mentioned in the article.


Survey: How Do You Pay For Unexpected Expenses? | Bankrate.com
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Old 01-20-2016, 02:14 PM   #2
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wow that's sad
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Old 01-20-2016, 02:28 PM   #3
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I may use my credit card to get the 1.5 cash back but I'll pay it off as soon as get the bill. So it really comes out of my cash reserves (savings)
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Old 01-20-2016, 03:01 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Car-Guy View Post
I may use my credit card to get the 1.5 cash back but I'll pay it off as soon as get the bill. So it really comes out of my cash reserves (savings)
Same for me, would just pay with credit card, get the cash back, and then pay off when bill is due tapping savings if necessary.

I think part of the problem is to define what is the unexpected expense limit? The $1000 used in the linked article would not cover many unexpected expenses.
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Old 01-20-2016, 03:02 PM   #5
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I said borrow from family or friends because I love to support an underdog position.
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Old 01-20-2016, 03:11 PM   #6
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Rob a bank.

Seriously, we keep funds in savings for that stuff, like when the water line from the meter to the house began leaking. Took the money out of savings and wrote a check for $3,400. Stuff happens, we plan for what we can and keep some extra for what we can't plan for.
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Old 01-20-2016, 03:28 PM   #7
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I have no doubt this group would do better than those surveyed. That's what savings are for. Hopefully, we're not early retiring too early.
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Old 01-20-2016, 03:28 PM   #8
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It depends on the size of the unexpected expense. Assuming it was something I could cover from savings, I would charge it to my credit card, and pay the credit card bill in full when it came due. That would give me some time to move money around and plan my future cash flows. I would cut discretionary expenses too.

If it was a really large expense (let's say my car was totaled or the house burnt down) I would dig into savings, talk with my insurance company and use my HELOC. (I wonder what happens to a HELOC if the house burns down! Hopefully if it's properly insured, nothing!)

And there's always crowdfunding....
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Old 01-20-2016, 03:35 PM   #9
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The article seems to be describing a much younger crowd than this audience, they mention Millennials outright. How I deal with 'unexpected expenses' now bears little resemblance to how I handled them as a 20- or 30-something.

We pay as we go now, but we have considerable $ (about 20% of total spending) money in our budget for 'unexpected expenses.' After 4 years retired, we're finding 20% above routine spending to be fairly accurate on average.
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Old 01-20-2016, 03:47 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Car-Guy View Post
I may use my credit card to get the 1.5 cash back but I'll pay it off as soon as get the bill. So it really comes out of my cash reserves (savings)
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Old 01-20-2016, 04:20 PM   #11
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+1

27 yo DS recently had some car repairs and was fretting that his emergency fund was taking a hit and he would have to rebuild it. Atta boy!
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Old 01-20-2016, 06:03 PM   #12
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I plan for unexpected expenses. If the amount exceeds my current accumulation, I take it from savings. (taking from savings almost always equals using credit card for one month). However, if the house fell down in an earthquake I would have a very different problem.
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Old 01-20-2016, 06:36 PM   #13
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"The survey shows that a very significant minority of American households apparently don't have the resources to pay for an unexpected expense of around $1,000," ....

ummm.... wondering how many constitute a "very significant minority"?
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Old 01-20-2016, 06:57 PM   #14
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I plan for unexpected expenses. ...........
But if they are planned for, are they really unexpected?
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Old 01-20-2016, 07:15 PM   #15
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I don't like this poll. I would have selected Pay with Credit card, Use Savings, and Reduce spending.

I'd use the credit card to get points and get the 30 day free loan. Pay it off with savings. And reduce my spending till the saving coffers were refilled.

This was demonstrated for me this last year. I budgeted for *some* OOP medical. But I hadn't planned on one son breaking his left elbow followed by his right wrist, and the other son taking a baseball to the face breaking his orbital socket and needing to see face bone specialists, eye specialists, etc... I paid with a credit card, paid the credit card off with savings. With that much cash flowing out of savings, I also cut back some on discretionary spending.
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Old 01-20-2016, 09:04 PM   #16
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When I was working, we had an emergency fund in a MM mutual fund.
Now, we just hit the IRA.
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Old 01-20-2016, 10:49 PM   #17
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All of the above although borrowing from friends/family is last resort. I'd take a loan from the retirement accounts before borrowing from friends/family.

Mind, $1000 would just be cash flowed.
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Old 01-20-2016, 11:24 PM   #18
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I have several layers, or tiers, of money I use to pay for unexpected expenses. For the relatively small ones, meaning anything around $750 or less, I have already built that into the cash I keep at my local bank's checking account over and above the minimum needed to avoid monthly fees. If the unexpected expense rises above $750, I "may" have to tap into other less readily available sources. Because some of my usual expenses are "lumpier," such as semi-annual car insurance premiums or estimated income tax payments, I have to budget for them a month or two in advance, carrying forward budget surpluses in the earlier months to cover them. I still reinvest any excess monthly (and quarterly) dividends from my stock and bond funds. But if an unexpected expense (> $750) comes in just after I one of those reinvestments of excess dividends, I may have to sell some shares if I don't have any new, excess cash arriving soon. That has very rarely happened since I ERed in 2008. For larger, unexpected expenses, I will usually redeem shares of a bond mutual fund whose purpose is to cover these expenses (my second tier EF). This has happened a few times since I ERed in 2008.
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Old 01-21-2016, 05:19 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Midpack View Post
The article seems to be describing a much younger crowd than this audience, they mention Millennials outright. How I deal with 'unexpected expenses' now bears little resemblance to how I handled them as a 20- or 30-something.
I agree with this. In my 20s and 30s we had a number of unplanned expenses, mostly medical. Even though we were thrifty and saved aggressively, these ate through our savings and twice we had to borrow money. We were fortunate that my employer gave emergency loans to help cover certain expenses.
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Old 01-21-2016, 05:27 AM   #20
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When I was in my early-mid 20's, I didn't own a house, so "unexpected expenses" were car or medical-related (I had some med issues).

In both cases, "Providers" often offered me discounts because I was young! I'm serious! The doctors and car fixing types even did some things for free, that they would have charged others to do. I did not plead, or even ask for these discounts. I just got them.

Karma: when I bought a house at age 28, I got energetically ripped off by everybody on all sides. Guess 28 isn't young enough for special treatment, or maybe it's just that real estate is such a cutthroat thing.

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