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View Poll Results: What's your citizenship
USA 217 84.77%
Canada 27 10.55%
Mexico 1 0.39%
Central America 0 0%
Caribbean 2 0.78%
Brazil 2 0.78%
Other South America 2 0.78%
China 2 0.78%
Japan 2 0.78%
Other SE Asia 3 1.17%
India 1 0.39%
Pakistan 0 0%
UK 10 3.91%
France 1 0.39%
Germany 3 1.17%
Other European 9 3.52%
Middle East 2 0.78%
Russia 2 0.78%
Australia/NZ 3 1.17%
Africa 1 0.39%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 256. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-15-2012, 09:34 AM   #21
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I voted Canada since that is where I now live. I didn't realized I could vote for my dual citizenship, I hold both a Canadian and USA passport. So add one vote to the USA in our poll!! LOL

Ramona, Burlington ON. Canada
Also a US citizen, lved in NH for 25+ years.
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Old 08-15-2012, 12:00 PM   #22
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I didn't forget Texas......I included Mexico..........
You are confusing California with Texas
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Old 08-15-2012, 12:13 PM   #23
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You are confusing California with Texas
.....and Nevada, New Mexico, Arizona, Utah and bits of Colorado and Wyoming too.
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Old 08-15-2012, 12:42 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by DFW_M5

You are confusing California with Texas
You misspelled "State of Jefferson". http://www.jeffersonstate.com/
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Old 08-15-2012, 12:51 PM   #25
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Voted US... but am applying for dual Italian.
Husband and sons are already dual Italian... I have to wait longer and jump through more hoops as the wife.

If anyone has any questions about the juris sanguinis process for getting dual citizenship with Italian - I lived and breathed it for almost 2 years while I documented/processed their application.
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Old 08-15-2012, 11:51 PM   #26
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Looking at the percentage totals we must have a LOT of dual citizens...
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Old 08-15-2012, 11:56 PM   #27
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Looking at the percentage totals we must have a LOT of dual citizens...
How do you figure that? I added up the percentages in each category and got 97%. (not 100% due to rounding).

Those of us with dual citizenships are just diversifying.
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Old 08-16-2012, 12:07 AM   #28
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How do you figure that? I added up the percentages in each category and got 97%. (not 100% due to rounding).

Those of us with dual citizenships are just diversifying.
Well, I just added US 86.26% + Canadian 11.54% + UK 3.85% and I'm already at 101%+ not counting all the other nationalities...but I'll be the first to admit I'm not good at math.
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Old 08-16-2012, 12:11 AM   #29
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I didn't realize until now that I am not the only Japanese here! (Japan does not give out dual, so as long as my mom/dad are alive (in Japan), I am keeping my Japanese citizenship, although I've lived here since my 20's.)

Hey,
UK
France
Germany and
Other European

C'mon! We need to break down the Europe a bit more. (We already have 8 votes on it.)
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Old 08-16-2012, 12:12 AM   #30
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183 people voted. 211 choices were selected. That would make 28 people dual citizens (unless there are people with more than 2 citizenships out there).
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Old 08-16-2012, 12:18 AM   #31
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This is starting to look like the Olympics...(Maybe I watched too much TV the last couple of weeks...)
USA leading with more medals...
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Old 08-16-2012, 12:36 AM   #32
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This is starting to look like the Olympics...(Maybe I watched too much TV the last couple of weeks...)
USA leading with more medals...
+1

Whoever set up the poll even managed to combine Australia and New Zealand - just like some of the Australian media did with the Olympics medal table
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Old 08-16-2012, 06:53 AM   #33
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+1

Whoever set up the poll even managed to combine Australia and New Zealand - just like some of the Australian media did with the Olympics medal table
I did that. The difficulty became only having 20 max possible choices. I know I've pissed off Aus and NZ by combining them...but I though I'd appeal to the old ANZAC spirit.

As for Europe, I included the 3 largest countries and then just put "Other European". I would have liked finer sampling, but the 20 category limit made me make some compromises.

There is also an error in the way the poll calculates percentages as it divided by the number of voters and not the total number of votes.
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Old 08-16-2012, 06:57 AM   #34
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and I neglected to include Deseret or claim Oregon for Britain
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Old 08-16-2012, 07:03 AM   #35
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183 people voted. 211 choices were selected. That would make 28 people dual citizens (unless there are people with more than 2 citizenships out there).
I'm not surprised at the percentage of dual citizens given the number of people that immigrate to the US. I'm UK/US myself and probably have a fairly common history of immigration and then getting US citizenship thus ending up with 2 passports.

If I had asked "What's your residency?" I bet it would be almost entirely US.
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Old 08-16-2012, 07:45 AM   #36
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What are the advantages of dual US citizenship? Wouldn't there be tax disadvantages if you ever moved away from the US?
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Old 08-16-2012, 08:59 AM   #37
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What are the advantages of dual US citizenship? Wouldn't there be tax disadvantages if you ever moved away from the US?
Having US citizenship and living in another country makes for complicated tax returns as you have to comply with the tax regimes of the US and your country of residence. If you move to a country with lower taxes than the US you'd loose out as you'll still have to pay US tax on your worldwide income. But if you retire to most 1st world countries your US taxes will probably be covered by foreign tax credits. Also US citizenship limits the types of foreign investments you can conveniently have and can make foreign banking difficult. But I'd be nervous to have nearly all of my assets in the US including many years of FICA payments and be an NRA and there's also 30% withholding on pension payments to NRAs, unless that is modified by a tax treaty. So there are pluses and minuses, becoming a US citizen and living abroad complicates finances and taxes, but at least you have the protection of US citizenship when it comes to SS and any other US assets.
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Old 08-16-2012, 09:55 AM   #38
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What are the advantages of dual US citizenship? Wouldn't there be tax disadvantages if you ever moved away from the US?
Our children were aged 4 and 6 when we came here in 1987 so getting US citizenship for them was a priority for us. I believe most (all?) Federal jobs were/are restricted to US citizens and we wanted to give them their best shot. I can't see either of them wanting to go back to England.

Having citizenship gives us the right to vote, and b$itch about the government . Taxation without representation, and all that.

I didn't consider taxation issues at the time, but I'm sure it wouldn't have changed our minds.

PS
As UK citizens we can't vote in the UK as we are not resident and therefore not UK tax payers. With the US you can't escape taxation but I believe you don't lose your vote either if you are resident in another country.
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Old 08-16-2012, 10:04 AM   #39
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My children are dual citizens, as are all the nieces and nephews on DW's side, some more than two. There may be a few downsides but for the most part it means greater horizons.

As for taxes, I recall my grandfather saying when you're paying taxes it means you;re working, and that's better than the alternative.
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Old 08-16-2012, 10:54 AM   #40
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Our children were aged 4 and 6 when we came here in 1987 so getting US citizenship for them was a priority for us. I believe most (all?) Federal jobs were/are restricted to US citizens and we wanted to give them their best shot. I can't see either of them wanting to go back to England.

Having citizenship gives us the right to vote, and b$itch about the government . Taxation without representation, and all that.

I didn't consider taxation issues at the time, but I'm sure it wouldn't have changed our minds.

PS
As UK citizens we can't vote in the UK as we not resident and therefore not UK tax payers. With the US you can't escape taxation but I believe you don't lose your vote either if you are resident in another country.
Having 2 citizenships gets rid of the issues with immigration and work and when children and spouses come into the picture there are definitely positives in getting dual citizenship.

Access to Federal jobs is a big plus of having US citizenship, but having a second non-US passport complicates getting a job that requires a security clearance. This is perfectly sensible as you don't want divided loyalties. To get such jobs you are required to give up the foreign passport, but not your foreign citizenship, although if you are asked whether you would be willing to renounce that foreign citizenship the best answer is "Yes"

Actually non-resident UK citizens can vote in UK national elections. I've voted in 4 UK General elections since I came to the US in 1987. However, that right stops after being non resident for 15 years. The US lets expat Americans vote in Federal elections and for states its the usual patchwork. If I move to the UK I definitely won't even try to vote in any MA elections to make sure there's no question of me being MA domiciled and thus liable to MA state tax.
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