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View Poll Results: What's your citizenship
USA 217 84.77%
Canada 27 10.55%
Mexico 1 0.39%
Central America 0 0%
Caribbean 2 0.78%
Brazil 2 0.78%
Other South America 2 0.78%
China 2 0.78%
Japan 2 0.78%
Other SE Asia 3 1.17%
India 1 0.39%
Pakistan 0 0%
UK 10 3.91%
France 1 0.39%
Germany 3 1.17%
Other European 9 3.52%
Middle East 2 0.78%
Russia 2 0.78%
Australia/NZ 3 1.17%
Africa 1 0.39%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 256. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-16-2012, 04:59 PM   #41
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Actually non-resident UK citizens can vote in UK national elections. I've voted in 4 UK General elections since I came to the US in 1987. However, that right stops after being non resident for 15 years. The US lets expat Americans vote in Federal elections and for states its the usual patchwork. If I move to the UK I definitely won't even try to vote in any MA elections to make sure there's no question of me being MA domiciled and thus liable to MA state tax.
I never realized that, not that I ever wanted to vote once I'd become non-resident. It seems odd being able to vote for an MP when you don't pay taxes. What constituency do you register in when you don't have a UK address?
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Old 08-16-2012, 05:10 PM   #42
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Yeah, I could claim Irish citizenship. Too much of a hassle to get the paperwork together and I don't really see the benefit.

Ditto for me as my parents were born in Eire.
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Old 08-16-2012, 05:12 PM   #43
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I never realized that, not that I ever wanted to vote once I'd become non-resident. It seems odd being able to vote for an MP when you don't pay taxes. What constituency do you register in when you don't have a UK address?
I left my registration at my parents' address as that's what it was just before I left for the US. Just a point of contention, I don't think voting should be connected with whether you pay taxes.....
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Old 08-16-2012, 07:12 PM   #44
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Voted USA solely, although I came to this country as a young adult. I will die here too. This country has been good to me. To borrow from Groucho Marx,

"When I came to this country, I did not have a nickel in my pocket.
Now, I have a nickel".
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Old 08-17-2012, 05:01 PM   #45
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Come on, guys, over 16,500 registered users and only 212 votes? Let's find out our group's geographic/nationality profile!
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Old 08-17-2012, 05:08 PM   #46
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Come on, guys, over 16,500 registered users and only 212 votes? Let's find out our group's geographic/nationality profile!
It's a shy, retiring group (pun intended)
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Old 08-18-2012, 06:59 AM   #47
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I'm surprised that 25% of the responses to this poll are non-US citizenships; that's higher than I expected.

NB. That's calculated by taking the total of the votes (not the voters).
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Old 08-18-2012, 07:23 AM   #48
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It's a shy, retiring group (pun intended)

Lots of INTJ types.....
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Old 08-18-2012, 07:26 AM   #49
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I did that. The difficulty became only having 20 max possible choices. I know I've pissed off Aus and NZ by combining them...but I though I'd appeal to the old ANZAC spirit.
not "pissed" at all - more amused than anything else. Sorry if it came across otherwise
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Old 08-18-2012, 09:26 AM   #50
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I didn't realize until now that I am not the only Japanese here! (Japan does not give out dual, so as long as my mom/dad are alive (in Japan), I am keeping my Japanese citizenship, although I've lived here since my 20's.)
It would not be Japan giving you dual, it would be the U.S.
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Old 08-18-2012, 09:55 AM   #51
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I didn't realize until now that I am not the only Japanese here! (Japan does not give out dual, so as long as my mom/dad are alive (in Japan), I am keeping my Japanese citizenship, although I've lived here since my 20's.)
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It would not be Japan giving you dual, it would be the U.S.
I don't know about Japan, but there are quite a few countries who don't allow their citizens to have dual citizenship. It won't matter if USA does not care when your native country "throws you out" if they learn you have taken another citizenship.
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Old 08-18-2012, 10:10 AM   #52
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That's interesting about dual citizenship. Obviously pro's and con's. Canadians have heard a lot about the tax problems of non resident US citizens recently and this has affected my thinking. Also, having a house in Arizona, I spend a lot of time trying to avoid US residency let alone citizenship. Thanks.
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Old 08-18-2012, 10:30 AM   #53
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Come on, guys, over 16,500 registered users and only 212 votes? Let's find out our group's geographic/nationality profile!
If this site uses google analytics or something similar, you should be able to get a detailed breakdown of users --> IP addresses --> countries.
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Old 08-18-2012, 10:46 AM   #54
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That's interesting about dual citizenship. Obviously pro's and con's. Canadians have heard a lot about the tax problems of non resident US citizens recently and this has affected my thinking. Also, having a house in Arizona, I spend a lot of time trying to avoid US residency let alone citizenship. Thanks.
You should also recognize that most if not all of the US tax disadvantages come already with a permanent residency (green card). At least when I "upgraded" from green card to citizenship 11 years ago, the citizenship only brought me benefits. Voting rights and eligibility for government jobs were alread mentioned, but at least back then also death tax treatment for permanent residents was much worse than for citizens.
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Old 08-18-2012, 11:29 AM   #55
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You should also recognize that most if not all of the US tax disadvantages come already with a permanent residency (green card). At least when I "upgraded" from green card to citizenship 11 years ago, the citizenship only brought me benefits. Voting rights and eligibility for government jobs were alread mentioned, but at least back then also death tax treatment for permanent residents was much worse than for citizens.
Interesting still. Tax liability comes with green card-even if you subsequently cease to be a resident? Death taxes are also an issue for those with US assets even if they are not residents.
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Old 08-18-2012, 12:37 PM   #56
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Interesting still. Tax liability comes with green card-even if you subsequently cease to be a resident? Death taxes are also an issue for those with US assets even if they are not residents.
If you give up your Green Card or US citizenship you have to fill out an "expatriation form" and file it with the IRS. If you verify that you are up to date with your last 5 years taxes and your net worth is below some number around $1.5M ( I don't remember the exact number) then you can be free of the IRS. However, in practice many people will have assets in the US so they will still have to comply with IRS regs. For example if a long term Green Card holder with US 401k or pensions gives up US residency to retires abroad they still have to deal with the tax implications of retirement income in the US and their new residence country. Luckily it's usually easy if you are a not a US citizen as tax treaties are set up so there would be no US tax due, just tax in the residence country. But you have to be careful that the 401k/IRA provider understands not to withhold any tax. If you are a US citizen things are a bit more complicated as you have to pay US tax and then ale a tax credit in your residence country.
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Old 08-19-2012, 06:02 PM   #57
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Justcurious,

Just like Grain said, Japan doesn't allow dual citizenship. It doesn't matter with which foreign country.

Quote:
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It would not be Japan giving you dual, it would be the U.S.
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Old 08-19-2012, 08:18 PM   #58
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If this site uses google analytics or something similar, you should be able to get a detailed breakdown of users --> IP addresses --> countries.
According to Alexa:
66.7 % of viewers are in the USA
9.8% of viewers are in India
4.0% of viewers are in the Phllipines sp

The other 19.5% are scattered around the world.
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Old 08-21-2012, 09:50 AM   #59
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Justcurious,

Just like Grain said, Japan doesn't allow dual citizenship. It doesn't matter with which foreign country.
Germany has some complex citizenship laws. You can be a dual citizen of Germany and the US by birth, but if you apply for US citizenship voluntarily you have to renounce your German citizenship unless you get special permission to keep it from the German Government. Of course the oath that you take at the US citizenship ceremony requires you to give up any previous allegiances to foreign countries so Germany and the US are on the same page.

It's ok to have dual German and other EU citizenship.
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Old 08-21-2012, 12:11 PM   #60
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Of course the oath that you take at the US citizenship ceremony requires you to give up any previous allegiances to foreign countries...
It has been more than 30 years for me, but this was what I remember. Only when coming to this forum that I saw people openly talked about dual citizenship.
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