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View Poll Results: What's your citizenship
USA 217 84.77%
Canada 27 10.55%
Mexico 1 0.39%
Central America 0 0%
Caribbean 2 0.78%
Brazil 2 0.78%
Other South America 2 0.78%
China 2 0.78%
Japan 2 0.78%
Other SE Asia 3 1.17%
India 1 0.39%
Pakistan 0 0%
UK 10 3.91%
France 1 0.39%
Germany 3 1.17%
Other European 9 3.52%
Middle East 2 0.78%
Russia 2 0.78%
Australia/NZ 3 1.17%
Africa 1 0.39%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 256. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-21-2012, 12:34 PM   #61
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It has been more than 30 years for me, but this was what I remember. Only when coming to this forum that I saw people openly talked about dual citizenship.
The US does not recognise dual citizenship, but then again it doesn't forbid it either. When you become a US citizen you are not required to give up a previous citizenship, but you are supposed to give up your allegiance to a foreign country. There is no law to stop you from continuing to use a foreign passport or, say, participate in foreign benefit schemes you qualify for through your original citizenship, however, if you are applying for US Government jobs that require a security clearance doing so would be evidence of a "foreign preference" and you would be refused clearance.

In the case of the UK what you say in a US citizenship ceremony has no impact on UK citizenship. So unless you go through the official UK renouncement procedure you will continue to be a UK citizen after taking US citizenship. Each country basically ignores your other citizenship. the UK is more forgiving as they don't mind if you enter the UK on your US passport, while it's illegal for a US citizen to enter the US on a foreign passport.

The fun starts when taxation and investing come into the picture as it's possible to get into some "Catch-22" situations.
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Old 08-21-2012, 03:17 PM   #62
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Originally Posted by NW-Bound View Post
It has been more than 30 years for me, but this was what I remember. Only when coming to this forum that I saw people openly talked about dual citizenship.
You remember correctly, but renouncing allegiance to another country is not the same as renouncing citizenship. (my bold in the quote below).

To renounce citizenship you have to do so in the presence of a consulate official of the country (at least that is the case for giving up UK citizenship)


https://www.usimmigrationsupport.org...tizenship.html

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Dual Citizenship: The U.S. government allows dual citizenship. United States law recognizes U.S. Dual Citizenship, but the U.S. government does not encourage it is as a matter of policy due to the problems that may arise from it. It is important to understand that a foreign citizen does NOT lose his or her citizenship when becoming a U.S. citizen. An individual that becomes a U.S. citizen through naturalization may keep his or her original citizenship. However, as some countries do not recognize dual citizenship, it is important to consider it carefully before applying for U.S. citizenship.

Dual citizenship is a complex issue and it is important to understand that there are not only benefits but also obligations that comes with being a dual citizen. Being a citizen of two countries means that you need to obey the laws of both countries, which may include paying taxes and serving in the military. The "United States Dual Citizenship Guide"explains these issues in detail.
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Old 08-22-2012, 01:11 AM   #63
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Dual citizen here also. But I checked the US only in the poll.
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Old 08-22-2012, 12:43 PM   #64
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Dual citizen here also. But I checked the US only in the poll.
Why?
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Old 08-22-2012, 02:00 PM   #65
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I have 3 US, Canada and UK. My Frineds call me 00 Ian (Double O).

US is the only nanny state that is taxed on WW income even when not living there. Remember the old slogan "Your Country Needs You" in the US is it "Your Country Owns You", at least this seems to be how it is percieved in some countries. I find it quite commical when I am in other countries. I get ridiculed on occasion for ever becoming an American. Conversly I try to explain that the US is a great place to be, expecially if you keep your nose clean (Nudge Nudge Wink Wink) and do not get caught up in the hype. It certainly has been good to DW and I. But you cannot tell come people.
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Old 08-22-2012, 09:45 PM   #66
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Conversly I try to explain that the US is a great place to be
Most ex-pats usually end that sentence with the word "FROM"!
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Old 08-22-2012, 10:03 PM   #67
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I have 3 US, Canada and UK. My Frineds call me 00 Ian (Double O).
My children have three as well - keeping track of the passport renewals etc is a real pain. I'm looking forward to them becoming old enough to do it all themselves.
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Old 08-22-2012, 11:10 PM   #68
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My children have three as well - keeping track of the passport renewals etc is a real pain. I'm looking forward to them becoming old enough to do it all themselves.
It sure can be a real pain with just two. With current security requirements I actually now have to fly to my old country's embassy in Washington DC, as they can nowadays only accept applications in person. Just glad I am not living in a country where they don't even have an embassy.
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Old 08-23-2012, 12:01 AM   #69
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It sure can be a real pain with just two. With current security requirements I actually now have to fly to my old country's embassy in Washington DC, as they can nowadays only accept applications in person. Just glad I am not living in a country where they don't even have an embassy.
We can go the HK and UK passports here in Hong Kong. The New Zealand consulate stopped doing passports several years ago so we now have to post the applications to Wellington.
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Old 08-23-2012, 06:00 AM   #70
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Most ex-pats usually end that sentence with the word "FROM"!
Not quite sure what you mean here. We like living in the USA. The only thing that will "Force" us to leave is the healthcare situation. But we will return for 212 days per year .

PS. Your Quote should Read... "Life's been good To Me,so far"! -J.Walsh

With reference to the Passport situation I only use 2. USA and EU. Getting back into the US is so much easier with a US Passport, getting everywhere else in the world is easier without one, and in some cases safer. I use my EU everywhere else. The Canadians do not seem to care as long as you have "a" passport. The Canadian passport is too inconvenient to get and only lasts 5 years so I do not bother. I just use my Citizenship card with my EU.
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Old 08-23-2012, 06:35 AM   #71
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The Canadian passport is too inconvenient to get and only lasts 5 years so I do not bother.
I believe they're looking at, or intending to introduce, 10 year passports effective 2013.
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Old 08-23-2012, 07:04 AM   #72
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With reference to the Passport situation I only use 2. USA and EU. Getting back into the US is so much easier with a US Passport, getting everywhere else in the world is easier without one, and in some cases safer. I use my EU everywhere else. The Canadians do not seem to care as long as you have "a" passport. The Canadian passport is too inconvenient to get and only lasts 5 years so I do not bother. I just use my Citizenship card with my EU.
I do the same. Leaving and entering the US I use the US passport, I must by law. Once I'm out of the US I use the UK passport. It makes getting into EU countries trivial and you don't have to worry about any immigration or visa stuff. Unfortunately doing that shows a foreign preference which means I'd have difficulty getting a US security clearance if I ever wanted one. Still US citizenship is mostly a pragmatic voting, financial and SS safety, it has no emotional resonance for me. Once I leave the US the US citizenship becomes a bit of a pain as it will complicate taxes so much.
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