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Old 05-06-2014, 11:28 PM   #21
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Goodness people, don't we know by now that anything means whatever it's author intends it to mean, ie. if it gets the effect he is after, that is all that matters. I am a superhero, I am retired, I am a master of the universe. If I say so, it must be true, and if you see it differently and express that, you must be one of those new fangled haters. Itself a newfangled term that intends to shut up anyone who still has the outdated habit of using external, historically accepted definitions.

Naughty, naughty!

Ha
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Old 05-06-2014, 11:46 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by aim-high View Post
Hey FUEGO. I was reading your blog comments and you wrote the following...



If you're not in it for the money, can I make a few suggestions?

It would be more helpful if the blog didn't look like a NASCAR. Remove the 15+ ads on your April Financial Update. It detracts from your content and message.

Also, the image links that most people would click on to expand a large view of the charts and graphs, goes through another page on your site and redirects to the Personal Capital website. There were 5 of them in that article. I clicked on one thinking I'd see a larger image of the chart. When it redirected me to the Personal Capital site (which I assume you get affiliate credit for) I felt like it was a bait and switch. It makes me not want to read the site.

Focus on supplying great content. Let those who are in it for the money do all the link bait, psychic hotline, ads galore type sites. You'll get a lot more readers that way and help a lot more people.
Yes, there are a lot of ads and a disclaimer that he "may receive a commission" when you click on a link he recommends.
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Old 05-07-2014, 01:06 AM   #23
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Now I KNOW some of you are way more frugal than I, as I have read the exploits of buying a case of white soap from the manufacturer to save a few bucks rather than buy store-bought soap with a manufacturers wrapper at retail. I like that.
I think the case of soap was mine. I suspect no one else here does that. I found out the warehouse for the soap I buy was a few blocks from where we buy our groceries. It actually saves $1 a bar or about $24 a case to go 10 minutes out of our way, so the soap actually has a high ROI on my time, much more than clipping coupons, which I have not found to be time effective for me.

But I do buy in bulk and stockpile. I just bought a years supply of dish detergent that was on sale for 1/3 off, plus I had a store coupon for another 50% off the total order, free shipping, a 1% cash back credit card, a 5% store loyalty program and bought through 5% cash back portal.

Two cases of soap a year = $48 year savings X 50 years = $2.5K. If we find 100 items like that to cut annually it comes out to $250K less in total retirement funding needed. It all adds up, but I try to only do things that have a high ROI on my time. I don't grow my own food or anything like that because that would take a lot of work.
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Old 05-07-2014, 05:14 AM   #24
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Goodness people, don't we know by now that anything means whatever it's author intends it to mean, ie. if it gets the effect he is after, that is all that matters. I am a superhero, I am retired, I am a master of the universe. If I say so, it must be true, and if you see it differently and express that, you must be one of those new fangled haters. Itself a newfangled term that intends to shut up anyone who still has the outdated habit of using external, historically accepted definitions.

Naughty, naughty!

Ha
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I should have learned that when I got that big chocolate easter bunny when I was 5. I thought I hit the motherlode -- bit into it and it was hollow!
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Old 05-07-2014, 07:46 AM   #25
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I should have learned that when I got that big chocolate easter bunny when I was 5. I thought I hit the motherlode -- bit into it and it was hollow!
I still remember that disappointment! Life Reality Lesson #1.
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Old 05-07-2014, 08:56 AM   #26
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(Emphasis mine.) I agree with you. Sorry, but I do not consider living off the work of one's spouse something which fits my definition of FI or retirement. A SAHD is no more retired than a SAHM if the spouse is working.
What do say about someone whose entire household spends 2.5% of their investment portfolio each year and has the paychecks from his wife piling up (unspent) in a money market account? What if that number was 1% and the working spouse worked 1 day per week because she likes what she does?

This comment is directed more generally beyond you, Scrabbler:

I'm starting to think some of your definitions of retirement aren't very fun any more. I can't spend time with my kids, piddle around in my yard with my garden and landscaping, or cook awesome meals (that's "being a SAHD" apparently). I can't do something I enjoy (and do for free at forums like this) and make a buck off of it with very occasional effort. You guys sure do put a lot of constraints on what someone can fill their day with.

Maybe because I'm 33 and not 20+ years older like the typical early retiree here. As much as I love laying in my hammock on my back deck cozied up with an engaging book, I can't do that all day every day.
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Old 05-07-2014, 09:15 AM   #27
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Maybe because I'm 33 and not 20+ years older like the typical early retiree here. As much as I love laying in my hammock on my back deck cozied up with an engaging book, I can't do that all day every day.
It sounds like you have the perfect scenario for yourself. I see no need to put a perfectly defined label on it. Retirement means doing anything you feel like doing. Sounds like you're doing just that.
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Old 05-07-2014, 09:22 AM   #28
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What do say about someone whose entire household spends 2.5% of their investment portfolio each year and has the paychecks from his wife piling up (unspent) in a money market account?
Still not FI/retired because when her paychecks pile up, they increase the 2.5% you can spend in the future. Money is fungible. You can spend her paychecks and let the portfolio grow. Or you can spend from the portfolio and let her paychecks grow the portfolio. Same thing.
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Old 05-07-2014, 09:24 AM   #29
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I think the case of soap was mine. I suspect no one else here does that. I found out the warehouse for the soap I buy was a few blocks from where we buy our groceries. It actually saves $1 a bar or about $24 a case to go 10 minutes out of our way, so the soap actually has a high ROI on my time, much more than clipping coupons, which I have not found to be time effective for me.

But I do buy in bulk and stockpile. I just bought a years supply of dish detergent that was on sale for 1/3 off, plus I had a store coupon for another 50% off the total order, free shipping, a 1% cash back credit card, a 5% store loyalty program and bought through 5% cash back portal.

Two cases of soap a year = $48 year savings X 50 years = $2.5K. If we find 100 items like that to cut annually it comes out to $250K less in total retirement funding needed. It all adds up, but I try to only do things that have a high ROI on my time. I don't grow my own food or anything like that because that would take a lot of work.
You are turning out to be my hero. I wish you could spend a week with my DW and show her your tenacity on how to hunt down the best deal. Seems like I am the one in the family that thinks about the low cost/high value proposition. Nice job!!
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Old 05-07-2014, 09:36 AM   #30
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Still not FI/retired because when her paychecks pile up, they increase the 2.5% you can spend in the future. Money is fungible. You can spend her paychecks and let the portfolio grow. Or you can spend from the portfolio and let her paychecks grow the portfolio. Same thing.
Warren Buffet: the latest guy to find himself not FI because he's still working. True, his 0.01% SWR is now closer to 0.009% given his productive efforts.

I've given up all hope of reaching "true" FI.
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Old 05-07-2014, 09:37 AM   #31
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It sounds like you have the perfect scenario for yourself. I see no need to put a perfectly defined label on it. Retirement means doing anything you feel like doing. Sounds like you're doing just that.
I think I'm going to give that hammock a try right now. That stack of novels by my bedside isn't going to read itself after all.
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Old 05-07-2014, 09:45 AM   #32
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Living on 2.5% of your investment portfolio is about $34K per year. The federal poverty level for a family of 5 is $28K per year. I'd say you live very, very frugally. Good for you.

My parents are retired by definition but are reliant on the government also in terms of medicaid. They aren't FI.

To me you've chosen a different path for earning a living. How it looks 10 years from now when you have 3 kids driving and going to college or 25 years from now is anyone's guess.

My big pet peeve is truth in advertising. Unfortunately our country accepts little of it. I personally find hitting all the buzzwords for personal finance and early retirement on a blog, loading it up with paid affiliate advertising links all over the place, and then saying you're not doing it for money is disingenuous - especially when that amounts to 25% - 40% of what you say you're living expenses are (based on current annual blog earnings from your posts.)

I don't have a problem with blogging, earning money, running personal finance sites, etc. I just personally find the way you (and some others) are going about it distasteful - but I guess that's why Baskin Robbins makes 31 flavors.
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Old 05-07-2014, 09:49 AM   #33
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Warren Buffet: the latest guy to find himself not FI because he's still working. True, his 0.01% SWR is now closer to 0.009% given his productive efforts.

I've given up all hope of reaching "true" FI.
You are not Warren Buffet. When your income from working makes up a small percentage of your expenses you reach true FI. Otherwise you are dependent on the work income just like others.
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Old 05-07-2014, 10:23 AM   #34
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Wife bought a can of 'Manwich' the other day just for the heck of it-----after mixing with hamburger and consuming it, kind of wish I'd had cat food instead.
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Old 05-07-2014, 10:26 AM   #35
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Just out of curiosity, would you all have considered my Granddad to have been retired, in this scenario...

Granddad took ER from the federal government in 1971 at age 55, to care for an ailing aunt. She passed away within about a year, but Granddad decided to not go back to work. As a result, he took up most of the chores around the house, did gardening, cooking, worked on cars on the side, occasionally watched me when I was a little kid, etc.

Grandmom kept working full time until the end of 1980, when she retired from the federal gov't, but then went back to work on a part time/on-call basis, varying hours, until she finally reached 70.

I don't know if Grandmom HAD to work, but she definitely CHOSE to work. And she was a bit of a workaholic. In fact, when she finally quit working at 70, she went downhill fast, although she's still holding on at 90.

Anyway, would you all consider Granddad to have been retired? He was drawing a pension, so he was contributing to the household, and not being a kept man/househusband. And while he did the mechanic work and did make some money, it was more of a hobby.
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Old 05-07-2014, 10:27 AM   #36
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... I can't spend time with my kids, piddle around in my yard with my garden and landscaping, or cook awesome meals (that's "being a SAHD" apparently). I can't do something I enjoy (and do for free at forums like this) and make a buck off of it with very occasional effort. You guys sure do put a lot of constraints on what someone can fill their day with.
Wow, twisting words much?

I didn't see anyone 'complaining' about what you decide to do with your time. Where did that come from? Sounds like a straw man. But if you come out in public and call it something, expect some questions on whether that is an accurate description.

No one cares much what I call my 'retirement', because I'm not throwing it out there in public making money or attracting attention to it. If I needed to be accurate, I'd say I'm retired from my job/career. DW still works because she wants to, and I can say that her modest income isn't really a factor in my retirement decision, or our lifestyle, but I'd probably be lying if having another income stream during the last meltdown didn't provide a calming effect. Between divs and her income, there was very little selling in a down market (and that was selling fixed and re-balancing at what turned out to be pretty good timing).

But if I wanted to claim I was retired and FI, while DW still works, I'd expect some push-back - just like the chain smoker who claims he doesn't have a habit because he could quit any time.

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Originally Posted by aim-high View Post
...

To me you've chosen a different path for earning a living. How it looks 10 years from now when you have 3 kids driving and going to college or 25 years from now is anyone's guess.

My big pet peeve is truth in advertising. Unfortunately our country accepts little of it. I personally find hitting all the buzzwords for personal finance and early retirement on a blog, loading it up with paid affiliate advertising links all over the place, and then saying you're not doing it for money is disingenuous - especially when that amounts to 25% - 40% of what you say you're living expenses are (based on current annual blog earnings from your posts.)

I don't have a problem with blogging, earning money, running personal finance sites, etc. I just personally find the way you (and some others) are going about it distasteful - but I guess that's why Baskin Robbins makes 31 flavors.
+1.

-ERD50
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Old 05-07-2014, 10:35 AM   #37
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I think the case of soap was mine. I suspect no one else here does that. I found out the warehouse for the soap I buy was a few blocks from where we buy our groceries. It actually saves $1 a bar or about $24 a case to go 10 minutes out of our way, so the soap actually has a high ROI on my time, much more than clipping coupons, which I have not found to be time effective for me.

But I do buy in bulk and stockpile. I just bought a years supply of dish detergent that was on sale for 1/3 off, plus I had a store coupon for another 50% off the total order, free shipping, a 1% cash back credit card, a 5% store loyalty program and bought through 5% cash back portal.
...
My wife also likes to buy in bulk (and me too). For example, when finding that a store has tomato sauce or chicken broth on an excellent sale, she would buy two cases.

The problem with that is that one can never downsize the house. We do not intend to, but man, one must be careful not to turn the home into a warehouse. By the way, we stopped using soap bars long ago, as we found that liquid soap caused less waste.
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Old 05-07-2014, 10:41 AM   #38
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Wife bought a can of 'Manwich' the other day just for the heck of it-----after mixing with hamburger and consuming it, kind of wish I'd had cat food instead.
I have done engineering projects in tuna processing facilities in Puerto Rico (Bumble Bee, etc) and NOTHING is wasted from processing raw tuna fish. The stuff that actually goes into cat food (at those plants) consists of the "parts" that don't go into retail tuna cans. Use your imagination.
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Old 05-07-2014, 10:43 AM   #39
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Since my wife is unlikely to retire entirely anytime soon, perhaps I should change my screen name back to FIREdreamer.
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Old 05-07-2014, 10:43 AM   #40
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I have done engineering projects in tuna processing facilities in Puerto Rico (Bumble Bee, etc) and NOTHING is wasted from processing raw tuna fish. The stuff that actually goes into cat food (at those plants) consists of the "parts" that don't go into retail tuna cans. Use your imagination.
That's of course not at all bad for cats. Out in the wild, animals eat all of their preys, except for bones. It makes them strong.

Now, is it really bad for humans too?
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