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Old 03-07-2013, 08:57 PM   #21
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I wonder if a key part of this is the 4 day schedule. Since you can be very clear with everyone that you work part-time now, people generally are more respectful of the time and hour limits. Not sure why this works, but when I move to a 4 day a week schedule, it was not a 20% reduction in work hours but a 50% reduction as people were much less likely to make requests for extra work that had to be done overnights and weekends.
That's really encouraging. I'd be content with a 20% reduction in work, but I wouldn't object to a further reduction. Another aspect is that the 80% of work I'll still do will be lower stress since other people would be the primary "owners" of the major issues. I'd just be there to help out.
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Old 03-07-2013, 09:05 PM   #22
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The danger is clearly that you end up working more hours than you originally had planned. Another danger is that people get pissed off at you because you can just blow everybody off. However, I must admit that it is quite empowering to blow everyone off.

If you do end up working more hours, can you get paid for those hours, too? As it was, my kids got older and left for college, so I found myself hanging around at work more, so I asked for more pay and got it.

Colleagues will be generally envious of you because they will not have the freedoms that you have. So as long as you are sensitive to that, you will do just fine. I found one way of being sensitive was to take folks to lunch often and just listen to them. I always pay for lunch.
Thanks LOL!. Yes, if I work more hours I'll get paid for those hours. It's almost tempting to work 5 days a week and get the extra cash. I think that I'll be content to stay with a 4-day / 32-hour work week for now though. Perpetual 3-day weekends may be just what I need to learn how to transition out of "work mode" and into "retirement mode".

Also, I appreciate your advice on how to treat colleagues. I definitely don't want to come off like a Prima donna to my co-workers. Taking them out to lunch and/or buying them a round at the bar across the street from the office should help
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Old 03-07-2013, 10:19 PM   #23
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Personally, I'm not retired..............yet.............and can't hardly wait, the last year has been especially brutal. So, for me, I'd be gone in a split second, once my money(FI) looked good as yours does. At some point, money does not matter anymore........you'll find it out.......someday.

And not to sound like a complete ass................however, when I finally leave this workplace for good, about two years from now, I want them to be more than glad I'm gone. It'll be mutual for sure, since I've worked 50+hours/week for 40 hours pay for years and have paid double my share of dues to the megaCorp overlords. I'm truly living Dilbert's existance at work, it's more than a little nonsensical.

As someone stated earlier, your mileage may vary.
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Old 03-08-2013, 03:59 AM   #24
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Speaking from lack of experience, I want to believe that working after your employer admits knowledge that you don't need, and perhaps don't care, to work for them anymore changes the job into a much more enjoyable and satisfying experience.
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Old 03-08-2013, 04:36 AM   #25
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Thanks for the advice. I fully expect the mounting pressure. The good news is that I no longer care I think that a big part of why my boss offered such a good deal was that he knew I was completely willing and able to walk away at any time. That's a nice position to be in when you are negotiating a deal.
The key thing I would recommend is to not burn bridges. Think of the reputation you have developed, the reason your boss wants to keep you on, as a no-cost insurance policy. Do your stint and be pleasant to everyone. If you feel others will resent you for what you negotiated, resist the temptation to brag and just do not say anything about it.
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Old 03-08-2013, 08:31 AM   #26
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Seems to me unless your only motivating factor for exit was not enough money, staying around to take more crap for more money is a zero sum game.
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Old 03-08-2013, 08:48 AM   #27
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I suppose the asteroid problem will be there, but you already know that.

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Old 03-08-2013, 09:02 AM   #28
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It's only three months. I've had toothaches that have lasted longer than that and I wasn't even getting paid. Suck it up and ignore the jealous ones.
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Old 03-08-2013, 10:07 AM   #29
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I think you've managed to create a sweet situation for yourself:

1) your boss(es) know you are fed up with the BS and are willing to walk, which gives you #2
2) a reduced work schedule that allows you to still work and stash cash (what you wanted to do) and perhaps the BS will be reduced because of your bosses' awareness of your BS threshold.
3) if the BS threshold continues to be exceeded, you've only committed three months, i.e., until the end of May or first week of June. Personally, April-June timeframe, to me, is the perfect time to retire...coming into the warmer months when you can spend a lot of time really enjoying yourself and decompressing.

Enjoy the three months, pad your cash stash a little more, and then decide what you want to do based on the situation at that time.

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Old 03-08-2013, 10:42 AM   #30
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During those 3 months train your successor, that delivers a message.
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Old 03-08-2013, 11:02 AM   #31
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Sounds like a great gig. You may even be able to extend it on your terms. I'm thinking 2 or 3 days after the initial 3 months.

Your reputation seems to be worth a great amount. If it were me, I'd try to expand this into consulting for other companies.
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Old 03-08-2013, 11:15 AM   #32
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Start living off your retirement money and spend the money you make on this gig on something you don't need. Like a new car, a toy or a trip.
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Old 03-08-2013, 11:23 AM   #33
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You are the only one who can answer the question of whether the additional money is worth shortening the non-working time prior to your death delaying retirement by three months.
++ 1 (yes a double + 1)

look at it this way. if it does not work out or you change your mind
you can always quit again.

Better option than being stuck in a J$%.

Good luck
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Old 03-08-2013, 12:55 PM   #34
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Seems to me unless your only motivating factor for exit was not enough money, staying around to take more crap for more money is a zero sum game.
My original plan (up until about a month ago) was to stick it out for another year and pad our buffer. That changed after I was given different responsibilities (primarily managing personnel in an awkward situation) and was working a lot at odd hours which disrupted seeing my family.

The new scenario will have me (at least theoretically) working fewer hours and working during normal business hours. In addition, my responsibilities will go back to what they originally were. When you add in the extra $, it felt like I just couldn't pass up the deal. I'm viewing this like I switched back to the original plan of padding our buffer at an accelerated rate for a few months.

If things go well and I enjoy the w*rk then I may consider continuing the deal a little longer, but I doubt I'd go much past this summer in any case. If things don't go well then I can simply head back to ER. It's good either way
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Old 03-08-2013, 01:00 PM   #35
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During those 3 months train your successor, that delivers a message.
I already started training two people who will jointly take over most of my current duties.

That tells me management knows I'm serious and is willing to be flexible. I'm encouraged by everything so far. Who would have guessed that the threat of ER would improve life so much at w*rk?
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Old 03-08-2013, 01:08 PM   #36
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If it were me, I'd try to expand this into consulting for other companies.
That was actually a secondary factor in my decision. I'm not planning to do consulting in retirement, but I want to have it as a backup plan in case of an emergency. It's my "Plan D" so hopefully things won't get so bad that I would ever need it...

My current gig is keeping me on good terms with my current employer and I think there are decent odds I could get them to take me back as a consultant in the future if I really needed the j*b for some unfathomable reason. It also opens the door to other companies too.
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Old 03-08-2013, 02:06 PM   #37
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Congratulations on your FI.

The 3 months should be up quickly and you can then focus on ER.

I had a similar situation when I resigned in 2011, with a few minor differences, but turned it down - and I'm happy I did. No regrets then, no regrets now.

But be very careful to look after your health and avoid workplace accidents during those 3 months. It would be awful if something happened and messed up your very bright future in retirement.
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Old 03-08-2013, 02:58 PM   #38
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That was actually a secondary factor in my decision. I'm not planning to do consulting in retirement, but I want to have it as a backup plan in case of an emergency. It's my "Plan D" so hopefully things won't get so bad that I would ever need it...

My current gig is keeping me on good terms with my current employer and I think there are decent odds I could get them to take me back as a consultant in the future if I really needed the j*b for some unfathomable reason. It also opens the door to other companies too.
Consulting is what's kept me sane while toiling in megacorp. It's not for everyone, and my unscientific analysis leads me to believe that most people here are against the concept. Every other week or so I spend a short day (maybe six hours) in a client's facility. When I walk through the door I feel as if I will accomplish something significant, and usually get to chat with the employees. It's mostly a very pleasant experience.

I can appreciate the thought of a plan 'B', as I use that terminology often. However, plan 'B' in my case is already in effect, and I nurture the relationship on a continuing basis. I am not sure that everyone can leave the game, and then jump right back in. To some extent you may have to keep the oars wet.
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Old 03-08-2013, 04:44 PM   #39
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I was in a similar situation the last two years I worked. I had already reached FI but I was given a much better position, more money, flexibility, etc, so I decided to stay on for "OMY" (which became almost two more years). Looking back, overall I'm glad I did it but I do regret the loss of the two more years working that I could have been enjoying in retirement. So I guess the unexpected pitfall for me was that I fell into the OMY trap (twice)
I am right there too; still in the OMY trap. I have tried to resign several times over the last two years but keep being countered with yet another offer that I cannot refuse.

Upside is continued padding of my retirement account and collaborating with some very intelligent folks; downside is that I cannot help be get very wrapped up, emotionally invested, etc.
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Old 03-08-2013, 05:31 PM   #40
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My original plan (up until about a month ago) was to stick it out for another year and pad our buffer. That changed after I was given different responsibilities (primarily managing personnel in an awkward situation) and was working a lot at odd hours which disrupted seeing my family.

The new scenario will have me (at least theoretically) working fewer hours and working during normal business hours. In addition, my responsibilities will go back to what they originally were. When you add in the extra $, it felt like I just couldn't pass up the deal. I'm viewing this like I switched back to the original plan of padding our buffer at an accelerated rate for a few months.

If things go well and I enjoy the w*rk then I may consider continuing the deal a little longer, but I doubt I'd go much past this summer in any case. If things don't go well then I can simply head back to ER. It's good either way
I see the points. Give us an update in a few months. Hope it works out well.
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