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Retirement unknowns causing anxiety
Old 03-15-2013, 08:20 AM   #1
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Retirement unknowns causing anxiety

I have moments of angst, which I imagine could intensify as I actually get closer to leaving w*rk. However, the data from this Franklin Templeton Retirement Income Strategies and Expectations (RISE) survey gives me greater hearburn:

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However, three in 10 American adults have not started saving for retirement. And it is not just young adults that lack adequate savings; 68% of those ages 45 to 54 and half of those ages 55 to 64 have $100,000 or less in retirement savings.

PLANSPONSOR.com - Retirement Unknowns Causing Anxiety

To those referred to in the last sentence, what we have saved is a fortune. And I do, at times, wonder if it's enough. I guess it's all relative.
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Old 03-15-2013, 08:31 AM   #2
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This week we had a 401k info meeting at work led by the company that manages our plan along with many others. I was surprised just how clueless many people are about saving for retirement. Some didn't even know where to log on and check their account. Others put all their money in the safest stable funds. And many, many loans being taken out on their 401k accounts. Unfortunately nobody at work ever talks about investing. Now I see why - they probably wouldn't know what to discuss!

But if you are comfortable with your savings and appear to be on target then I wouldn't get heartburn over news like that. Those people will be heavily reliant on Social Security and will be just barely getting by in retirement.
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Old 03-15-2013, 08:50 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by SumDay View Post
I have moments of angst, which I imagine could intensify as I actually get closer to leaving w*rk. However, the data from this Franklin Templeton Retirement Income Strategies and Expectations (RISE) survey gives me greater hearburn:




PLANSPONSOR.com - Retirement Unknowns Causing Anxiety

To those referred to in the last sentence, what we have saved is a fortune. And I do, at times, wonder if it's enough. I guess it's all relative.

as long as it's not you why worry about it.
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Old 03-15-2013, 08:57 AM   #4
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as long as it's not you why worry about it.
I inherited some high-risk promissory mortgage notes from my parents. I'm just hoping they're all paid for before these folks reach retirement age. They're barely making payments now. Part of my retirement is based on timely receipt of those payments.

And besides, I'm of the belief that a rising tide raises all ships. I think the rift between the "haves" and the "have-nots" is getting bigger all the time, but this is probably a hot button I shouldn't push on this congenial forum.
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Old 03-15-2013, 09:07 AM   #5
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Every situation is so different (income needs vs. expenses) that it is difficult to listen to the opinions of others. What might be plenty for one isn't enough for someone else.

Nevertheless, the experiences from the contributors in this forum are that everyone seems to be doing just fine. I assume that is reassuring to someone considering retirement. People are making it ...and in some cases making it really well.

My advice is create a realistic budget of your future expenses. And then you'll know what you'll need. I created a spreadsheet that got more and more elaborate and detailed as time went by. The more precise it got, the more useful it became. I figured in my potential incomes from social security and different "what-if's" from investments.

Doing all that helped convince me that I could retire, pay my bills, and have money to spare to play around with. So I retired last summer and it's going just as expected.

Good luck to you.
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Old 03-15-2013, 09:16 AM   #6
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Back before computers, I had time to track literally every dime we spent in a very detailed notebook full of ledger sheets.

Then we had kids.... Now they're grown & gone.... And I once again am making the time to do this. I've used Quicken for well over a decade, but not to the level I am now. I am once again even breaking down the Costco bill into groceries, clothing, household, etc. I used to just pay the bill, but I was losing a lot of detail by doing it that way.

I've got to keep insurance on DH (pre-existing condition) for ~5 more years, so I've got lots of time to continue tracking. I think we'll be fine - my worry-wart nature just needs some reassurance.
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Old 03-15-2013, 09:18 AM   #7
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"Grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change,
The courage to change the things I can,
And wisdom to know the difference."

After almost 35 years proactively counseling hundreds of employees about planning for their future financial security, managing their 401k's intelligently, etc. - and being largely ignored or even criticized for it, despite all sorts of different approaches...

Didn't stop me from doing what I thought was the right thing, I did what I could. I wish my former co-workers well, but I fear for most of them financially.
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Old 03-15-2013, 09:40 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SumDay View Post
I have moments of angst, which I imagine could intensify as I actually get closer to leaving w*rk. However, the data from this Franklin Templeton Retirement Income Strategies and Expectations (RISE) survey gives me greater hearburn:




PLANSPONSOR.com - Retirement Unknowns Causing Anxiety

To those referred to in the last sentence, what we have saved is a fortune. And I do, at times, wonder if it's enough. I guess it's all relative.
SumDay, how does this affect you and your retirement efforts and objectives?
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Old 03-15-2013, 09:45 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by coolowl View Post
......

My advice is create a realistic budget of your future expenses. And then you'll know what you'll need. I created a spreadsheet that got more and more elaborate and detailed as time went by. The more precise it got, the more useful it became. I figured in my potential incomes from social security and different "what-if's" from investments.

Doing all that helped convince me that I could retire, pay my bills, and have money to spare to play around with. So I retired last summer and it's going just as expected.

Good luck to you.
This is what I did. Understand that there is no certainty in anything you assume. Make your plan and adjust as you will have to when life happens!
It is a wild ride, but no wilder than maintaining employment for decades.
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Old 03-15-2013, 10:06 AM   #10
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SumDay, how does this affect you and your retirement efforts and objectives?

MichaelB, see Post #4 above
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Old 03-15-2013, 10:24 AM   #11
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Nevertheless, the experiences from the contributors in this forum are that everyone seems to be doing just fine.
Which forum is that? I have expressed many times to being borderline and not sleeping as well as I'd like to, and I've read of many others (e.g. many of the OMY folks) in similar situations. If everyone were "doing just fine" there wouldn't be much need for a place like this to help folks like me/us.

While I expect there is some fear-mongering in the article cited in the O.P., I know many... too many hard-working families who have enough trouble making ends meet, and still haven't enough left over to think about saving for retirement. Usually, their kids come first, and they'll deny themselves a future before denying their kids one.

The contributors here are in a select minority. I often wonder how many folks find this place, lurk a bit, then realize how ill-prepared they are, and never/seldom post out of embarrassment, fear, or reality check.

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Old 03-15-2013, 10:28 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by SumDay View Post
I inherited some high-risk promissory mortgage notes from my parents. I'm just hoping they're all paid for before these folks reach retirement age. They're barely making payments now. Part of my retirement is based on timely receipt of those payments.
I see your point.

Is it possible to sell these notes to somebody else (probably at a discount) who is willing to take the risk and use the funds to develop another source of income for retirement?
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Old 03-15-2013, 11:01 AM   #13
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Is it possible to sell these notes to somebody else (probably at a discount) who is willing to take the risk and use the funds to develop another source of income for retirement?
I've sold some of the actual homes after foreclosing (abandonment, cash for keys, etc.). The rest: I'm stuck with. Believe me, I've tried everything. Their credit scores are so bad, no one would touch them for even a penney on the dollar. I was so desperate that one day I even called Dave Ramsey's show to get his input. After listening to everything I'd done his response was "darlin', you're screwed. Make lemons into lemonade."

Actually, the ones I have left are the cream of the crop and I've got a pretty good system down. I still have to hear a story or two as to why they'll be a few days/weeks late each month, but they are paying. It's just my nature to worry about those less fortunate, and believe me, they are less fortunate.

FYI, I really didn't post this article asking for advice, I was just giving my personal thoughts on the state of affairs re: retirement savings.
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Old 03-15-2013, 11:24 AM   #14
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I still have to hear a story or two as to why they'll be a few days/weeks late each month, but they are paying. It's just my nature to worry about those less fortunate, and believe me, they are less fortunate.
Maybe that's your lemonade. The right book or script with all the stories just might sell...

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Old 03-15-2013, 01:23 PM   #15
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My number one rule don't rely on inheritances for retirement, make it your fun money.
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Old 03-15-2013, 01:28 PM   #16
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My number one rule don't rely on inheritances for retirement, make it your fun money.
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Old 03-15-2013, 02:07 PM   #17
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This week we had a 401k info meeting at work led by the company that manages our plan along with many others. I was surprised just how clueless many people are about saving for retirement. Some didn't even know where to log on and check their account. Others put all their money in the safest stable funds. And many, many loans being taken out on their 401k accounts. Unfortunately nobody at work ever talks about investing. Now I see why - they probably wouldn't know what to discuss!

I have heard it is due to litigation fears too!

I invested in fund ABC like the company said and I lost $XXXXX. Class action suit to follow....
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Old 03-15-2013, 02:39 PM   #18
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I inherited some high-risk promissory mortgage notes from my parents. I'm just hoping they're all paid for before these folks reach retirement age. They're barely making payments now. Part of my retirement is based on timely receipt of those payments.

And besides, I'm of the belief that a rising tide raises all ships. I think the rift between the "haves" and the "have-nots" is getting bigger all the time, but this is probably a hot button I shouldn't push on this congenial forum.
i don't understand. do they owe you the money or someone else. if they owe someone else how are you liable
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Old 03-15-2013, 03:06 PM   #19
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Whenever I see data like this, it just raises my concerns about how much social security a lot of us will see. One of the proposals which is particularly irksome to me is to set a minimum payout that everyone will receive regardless of what they paid in. SS is so incredibly skewed already to those who have contributed the least.
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Old 03-15-2013, 03:21 PM   #20
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as long as it's not you why worry about it.
Because if it gets to be a big problem, affecting a lot of people, someone will step forward to solve it.
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