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Old 11-15-2012, 09:26 PM   #21
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Per M* Portfolio tracker tool, total return YTD = 8.23 %

current AA = 32/65/3

VEUSX, VWALX, and VTSAX are leading the way...
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Old 11-15-2012, 09:33 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steelyman View Post
I can't access any of my retirement money without penalties for several more years.

There is a finance professor who appeared on a local NPR radio broadcast monthly who always said you are not in a "price accumulation" mode, but rather a "share accumulation" mode. So, to me, the price drops lately may be a good thing since I get more shares, especially with the capital gains and dividend distributions that are upcoming (assuming reinvestment).

I think it's the same thing in reverse when you are decumulating, but you may need to pay more attention.
This is how I'm trying to look at the recent downturn, as well. We did very well buying on the downturn in 2008-09, so trying to keep the long-term perspective.
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Old 11-16-2012, 03:22 AM   #23
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I just realized one thing. Do the numbers above also include the amount of money saved this year or just the interest on the total invested assets as of last January ?
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Old 11-16-2012, 03:23 AM   #24
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i follow the fidelity insight income and capital preservation model which is only 3% equities as of right now, up around 9% or so.
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Old 11-16-2012, 06:12 AM   #25
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Can't I tell you where I was 9/14?
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Old 11-16-2012, 06:15 AM   #26
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9/14 12.6%
11/1 11.4%
11/15 8.4%

aa 60/40
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Old 11-16-2012, 06:47 AM   #27
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I shouldn't be posting here, because DW and I are ultra risk averse. Our retirement nest egg is in Susan Anthony dollars, buried in coffee cans in our back yard. The balance is in 30 year IBonds which we bought from 2001 to 2003, and a few longer term CD's (under 5%).

America's Best Kept Financial Secret: I Bonds | PBS NewsHour
(note: the article talks about a $10K/person limit. When we invested it was $30K/person it was $30K/person)

edited to add: After comparing the past ten year return on our IBonds, it appears that it beats the DJIA... 6% to 4%.

Have been very nervous since 2009 when a good friend watched as his retirement fund lost $400K, and yes, he has recovered about 80% of that.

...Still, at this time, we feel relatively safe with our existing capital, and at our age, feel no great need to try and make more. We weighed the risk-reward, and decided to go with our comfort zone.

That said, watching the market as a fly on the wall, last year, after reading one of the gurus on Motley Fool speak to long term "safety" in the market for risk averse investors, I took his recommended 10 safest stocks, and created a portfolio to watch. Here's the result, from February 12 2011, to November 15, 2012. a 4% return.



This probably doesn't belong on the thread, but thought you might be interested in the kind of thinking that is extant in the minds of many older retirees with limited reserves, who have a shorter investment horizon. Not a recommendation, just an observation.
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Old 11-16-2012, 08:00 AM   #28
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imoldernu, from the calcs that you have shown it loos like the return doesn't include dividends (which would increase the return) and is for 21 months (which would decrease the return if converted ton an annualized return.

Quote:
Originally Posted by obgyn65 View Post
I just realized one thing. Do the numbers above also include the amount of money saved this year or just the interest on the total invested assets as of last January ?
In my case it is the internal rate of return on my investment portfolio given the beginning market value, cash flow (additions, withdrawals, interest, dividends, etc) and ending market value; then converted to an annualized rate. It is off the Investment Performance report in Quicken.
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Old 11-16-2012, 09:08 AM   #29
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The values presented here appear to be just great, taking into consideration that DowJones only made about 0,3% since January 1st!

Congratulations!
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Old 11-16-2012, 09:16 AM   #30
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The values presented here appear to be just great, taking into consideration that DowJones only made about 0,3% since January 1st!

Congratulations!
That seems too low so I looked it up. This says 5.15% YTD.

http://quicktake.morningstar.com/index/IndexCharts.aspx?Country=USA&Symbol=$INDU
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Old 11-16-2012, 09:53 AM   #31
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7.2% on my Fido 401K year to date (through 11/15). AA is about 60/40. But who knows -- the way the last two weeks have gone, 2012 could wind up being a negative year when all is said and done.
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Old 11-16-2012, 10:12 AM   #32
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As of today 8% .Two weeks ago closer to 12%
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Old 11-16-2012, 11:56 AM   #33
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My Roth YTD return:
as of 9/30/12, 13.83%
as of 11/15/12, 10.07%
This account is Growth, 45%, Growth & Income 36%, Equity-Income 15%, and Balanced 4%.

My 401K 1 yr return:
as of 11/15/12, 10.7%
all in Vanguard Target 2045. Which is 90% stocks 10% bonds.
Even though I'm hoping to be out around 2027.

Those sound pretty good.

My annualized since 2003 return in my Roth is 5.74%. I remarked in a post a month or two ago that I thought this was "pathetic." But it turns out it was just normal. I think.
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Old 11-16-2012, 12:39 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by obgyn65 View Post
I just realized one thing. Do the numbers above also include the amount of money saved this year or just the interest on the total invested assets as of last January ?
You probably get a little of everything -- some making contributions, some taking distributions, some doing both, some giving true YTD numbers, some giving annualized YTD numbers, some that are not sure, but they see a number on Quicken or a brokerage display and just use that.

Us, we are up almost 10% after taking enough to pay some bills and not making contributions.
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Old 11-16-2012, 05:26 PM   #35
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Ok. Just to clarify, my number excluded money saved this year.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rustward

You probably get a little of everything -- some making contributions, some taking distributions, some doing both, some giving true YTD numbers, some giving annualized YTD numbers, some that are not sure, but they see a number on Quicken or a brokerage display and just use that.

Us, we are up almost 10% after taking enough to pay some bills and not making contributions.
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Old 11-16-2012, 06:07 PM   #36
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My results are also net of additions.
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Old 11-16-2012, 07:32 PM   #37
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My results are net of withdrawals (I'm in draw-down phase)

As of today, IRR is 7.1% ytd.

AA as of today is 35/53/12 (I classify i-Bonds as cash)
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Old 11-17-2012, 02:21 AM   #38
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I am pleased to read that I am not the only one to be totally risk averse around here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by imoldernu View Post
I shouldn't be posting here, because DW and I are ultra risk averse.
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Old 11-17-2012, 04:51 AM   #39
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with the newsletter we follow the growth model which was 7 points ahead of my 97% fixed income model is now only 1% ahead of my model.

9.5% for the growth vs 8.5 for my fixed income model.

boy i love it when i feel like a genius.
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Old 11-17-2012, 05:12 AM   #40
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I haven't ckecked it out. I see I still haven't hit any rebalance point for my AA so it couldn't be too far off from the last time I checked in June. Anyway I can't spend percentages so maybe I'll take a peak at the balances.
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