Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Roll TSP into TIPS IRA's ?
Old 01-09-2009, 12:51 AM   #1
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Texarkandy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 1,281
Roll TSP into TIPS IRA's ?

I am looking forward to retiring at the end of '09 at 49 years old from the Fed Govt (fingers-crossed, knock-on-wood) & have quite a few $ (000K) in the low cost Thrift Savings Plan G-fund. (earns based on a mix of short, med, & long term US Treauries)

My ER plan is such that I don't plan on needing these $ from the TSP till at least 59.5 - & possibly later (although there are some penalty free withdrawal options before then.)

I was in the "C" fund (S&P 500 index) for many years & managed to accumulate a decent little nest-egg. Overall it's been pretty good to me & I was fortunate (nervous?) enough to shift 100% of my monies into the "G" Fund in Apr '07. The TSP is very low cost.

My issue is: despite my years in the S&P 500 Index I have become very risk averse now that the ER date is looming. I will be satisfied just to maintain what I have in TSP at this point & match inflation & hopefully beat it by a couple points in some years. This is my ER plan's long-term security money - ER'ing at 50 means we have a loooong time to be retired.

(What really scares me is hyperinflation at some point in the future and I find it hard to see the G-Fund even keeping pace with regular inflation the next few years the way things have been going.)

The thought occurred to me recently to roll it all out of TSP when I retire into several IRA's consisting of TIPS - at least there the govt is assuring me an inflation match (per the CPI?).

What say the members of the board? Opinions?

* Will I beat inflation in the low-cost safe TSP G Fund over ten years?

* Would my monies be better off out of TSP & rolled into an IRA consisting of TIPS - to suit my objectives and risk tolerance

* Should I stop being a nervous-nellie & reestablish an AA in the TSP that includes indexed equities while everything's "on sale"
(index choices in TSP include: S&P500 fund, Small Caps fund, Bonds fund, & a foreign equities fund - or some "lifecycle" funds that make & adjust the allocations for you)

* is the world coming to an end within 5 years & I should buy gold, guns, bullets, & MRE's?

I would welcome any/all opinions/thoughts from the esteemed members of the board (heck, maybe even from the not-so-esteemed)
- especially thoughts re: TIPS IRA's.
__________________

__________________
Retired 2009!
Texarkandy is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 01-09-2009, 02:14 PM   #2
Recycles dryer sheets
SteveL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 380
Risk tolerance quiz - MSN Money

The above link is for a risk tolerance questionnaire. Sounds to me a bit like you are looking for reassurance that AA is still the right thing to do in this market. You need to feel comfortable with what ever you end up doing.

I retired in 2001 and saw an immediate drop in my retirement fund. (IRA) I've taken nothing out, and despite the current market, I am still up about 20% from where I was in 2001. I attribute this to AA. Doing it, annual adjustments, and having faith for the long term in the USA......
__________________

__________________
SteveL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2009, 02:22 PM   #3
Moderator
ziggy29's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 15,612
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveL View Post
Risk tolerance quiz - MSN Money

The above link is for a risk tolerance questionnaire. Sounds to me a bit like you are looking for reassurance that AA is still the right thing to do in this market. You need to feel comfortable with what ever you end up doing.
I've become a bit cynical about these risk tolerance quizzes. I think the market over the last fifteen months -- and the last four in particular -- have told us a lot more about risk tolerance than any theoretical quiz with imaginary money ever could.

It's easy to say you could weather a 30-40% hit to your portfolio without losing sleep in some online risk tolerance assessment a couple years ago -- it's another to actually live it with real money...

I think one thing the recent market has taught us is that a lot of people overestimated their risk tolerance.
__________________
"Hey, for every ten dollars, that's another hour that I have to be in the work place. That's an hour of my life. And my life is a very finite thing. I have only 'x' number of hours left before I'm dead. So how do I want to use these hours of my life? Do I want to use them just spending it on more crap and more stuff, or do I want to start getting a handle on it and using my life more intelligently?" -- Joe Dominguez (1938 - 1997)

RIP to Reemy, my avatar dog (2003 - 9/16/2017)
ziggy29 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2009, 02:50 PM   #4
Moderator Emeritus
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 11,031
Given the investment options available in the TSP, if keeping up with inflation over the long term is a concern, I would go with:

Quote:
stop being a nervous-nellie & reestablish an AA in the TSP that includes indexed equities while everything's "on sale"
(index choices in TSP include: S&P500 fund, Small Caps fund, Bonds fund, & a foreign equities fund - or some "lifecycle" funds that make & adjust the allocations for you)
Foreign equities (unhedged I assume) might help if inflation is due to the US government cranking the printing presses to overdrive. I also remember reading that small caps fared the best in a high inflation environment. Typically though, hard assets (RE, commodities, ...) are supposed to be best of all but they don't seem to be an option in your case.

Quote:
is the world coming to an end within 5 years & I should buy gold, guns, bullets, & MRE's?
Of course, the world is supposed to end on 12/21/2012, so who cares about long-term inflation?
__________________
FIREd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2009, 02:54 PM   #5
Moderator
ziggy29's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 15,612
Quote:
Originally Posted by FIREdreamer View Post
Of course, the world is supposed to end in 12/21/2012, so who cares about long-term inflation?
Cool -- in that case, I can retire, pull all my money out of my 401K and IRAs, eat the 10% penalty, and still live well for 4 years off of it....

I must be a schmuck for w*rking still!
__________________
"Hey, for every ten dollars, that's another hour that I have to be in the work place. That's an hour of my life. And my life is a very finite thing. I have only 'x' number of hours left before I'm dead. So how do I want to use these hours of my life? Do I want to use them just spending it on more crap and more stuff, or do I want to start getting a handle on it and using my life more intelligently?" -- Joe Dominguez (1938 - 1997)

RIP to Reemy, my avatar dog (2003 - 9/16/2017)
ziggy29 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2009, 02:55 PM   #6
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Texarkandy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 1,281
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveL View Post
Risk tolerance quiz - MSN Money

The above link is for a risk tolerance questionnaire. Sounds to me a bit like you are looking for reassurance that AA is still the right thing to do in this market. You need to feel comfortable with what ever you end up doing.

I retired in 2001 and saw an immediate drop in my retirement fund. (IRA) I've taken nothing out, and despite the current market, I am still up about 20% from where I was in 2001. I attribute this to AA. Doing it, annual adjustments, and having faith for the long term in the USA......
Well, I took the MSN quiz but have doubts as to it's applicability to my particular situation/question or the current economic climate. Like you, I do have "faith for the long term in the USA" - but I am not so sure the whole investment paradigm we've had for years for small investors is not changing even as we speak - so a lot of the old "rules of thumb" may be outdated. (and index thumbs might not be the no-brainer they used to be for folks like me)

In any case, my quiz result was as follows:

Results
Your score for risk capacity is 30With a score between 30 and 38 you have the wherewithal to take selective investment risks that includes both stocks - which carry higher risk - and bonds, that have much less risk. You might consider a portfolio that is anchored by large company U.S. stocks -- perhaps 40 percent -- maybe in an index fund. Include small company U.S. stocks, too, at about 20 percent. International stocks should play a role -- perhaps another 20 to 25 percent of your portfolio. The final 20 percent could split between short to medium term bonds and some type of hedge, such as a natural resources fund. This type of portfolio could lose about 20 percent in a year.
Your score for risk tolerance is 28With a tolerance of 23 to 32, you have a moderate risk tolerance, but you have the capacity for a more aggressive investment strategy. You may want to consider learning how to increase your risk tolerance by learning more about investment strategies. You might consider a portfolio that is anchored by large company U.S. stocks, maybe in an index fund. Include small company U.S. stocks, too, at about 20 percent. International stocks should play a role -- perhaps another 20 to 25 percent of your portfolio. The final 20 percent could split between short to medium term bonds and some type of hedge, such as a natural resources fund. This type of portfolio could lose about 20 percent in a year.
__________________
Retired 2009!
Texarkandy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2009, 03:13 PM   #7
Moderator Emeritus
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 11,031
Quote:
Originally Posted by ziggy29 View Post
Cool -- in that case, I can retire, pull all my money out of my 401K and IRAs, eat the 10% penalty, and still live well for 4 years off of it....

I must be a schmuck for w*rking still!
Well haven't you watched "Doomsday Week" on the history channel? Where do you get your news from? CNN? the Times? It's so 2008...

Apparently a bunch of oracles (Mayas, Nostradamus, Merlin, etc...) have predicted the end of the world for 2012. On 12/21/2012 the sun will eclipse the center of the galaxy (a very rare event that happens only once every 26,000 years) at which point something bad has to happen on earth (brutal polar shift, supervolcano eruption, or other human race extinction type of event). It's all very scientific (with just a smidgen of "objective" interpretation thrown in for good measure), so you know it's not some made-up BS!

One of my favorite arguments to backup this "upcoming armageddon" theory is that the "world has never seen as much turmoil" as it has in the last few years... Really! Every time I pick up a history book I am thinking, wow, those people who lived in antiquity, in the middle ages, or in the early 20th century had it real good compared to me!

Anyways, I am quitting my job, cashing my retirement account and I am going to spend it all before 2012!
__________________
FIREd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2009, 03:51 PM   #8
Recycles dryer sheets
bamsphd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 337
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texarkandy View Post
My ER plan is such that I don't plan on needing these $ from the TSP till at least 59.5 - & possibly later (although there are some penalty free withdrawal options before then.)
So you have money you do not expect to need for 10+ years in the TSP, which is widely believed to be the very best investment plan available to non-millionaire individuals in the US. It is a plan that features extremely low costs, extremely low manager risk, and is probably the only plan in the US of A all but guaranteed to be bailed out by the federal government if it suffers from a massive custodial fraud.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Texarkandy View Post
My issue is: despite my years in the S&P 500 Index I have become very risk averse now that the ER date is looming. I will be satisfied just to maintain what I have in TSP at this point & match inflation & hopefully beat it by a couple points in some years. This is my ER plan's long-term security money - ER'ing at 50 means we have a loooong time to be retired.

(What really scares me is hyperinflation at some point in the future and I find it hard to see the G-Fund even keeping pace with regular inflation the next few years the way things have been going.)
Hyperinflation scares me to. That is why I keep a higher than normal percentage of my assets in stocks, and most of my bonds in TIPS. However, I would hate to have 100% of my assets in any one asset class, even TIPS. That would be way too risky for me to sleep at night.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Texarkandy View Post
The thought occurred to me recently to roll it all out of TSP when I retire into several IRA's consisting of TIPS - at least there the govt is assuring me an inflation match (per the CPI?).
Well that should increase your fees, and your custodial risk anyway. Unless you were doing this to also perform a Roth conversion because you see large federal deficits now, and figure that means large federal taxes later, I don't think this idea would be a big win.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Texarkandy View Post
What say the members of the board? Opinions?

* Will I beat inflation in the low-cost safe TSP G Fund over ten years?
Yes if we have deflation, no if we have hyper-inflation, otherwise maybe.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Texarkandy View Post
* Should I stop being a nervous-nellie & reestablish an AA in the TSP that includes indexed equities while everything's "on sale"
(index choices in TSP include: S&P500 fund, Small Caps fund, Bonds fund, & a foreign equities fund - or some "lifecycle" funds that make & adjust the allocations for you)
That sounds like a good choice.
__________________
bamsphd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2009, 10:18 PM   #9
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Pasadena CA
Posts: 2,695
I rolled two IRAs into the TSP when I was working. When I retired I rolled about 1/3 of my TSP into an IRA to capture some asset classes not in the TSP and to be able to convert some into a Roth in 2010. My overall stock selections which included some foreign ETFs have not kept up with the TSP Lifecycle fund that remained in the TSP. There are reasons to have assets outside the TSP but I expect I will always have some funds in it at least for the G or L Income fund.
__________________
T.S. Eliot:
Old men ought to be explorers
yakers is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2009, 10:51 PM   #10
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Texarkandy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 1,281
Quote:
Originally Posted by yakers View Post
I rolled two IRAs into the TSP when I was working. When I retired I rolled about 1/3 of my TSP into an IRA to capture some asset classes not in the TSP .....
This is an interesting concept I'll have to mull over -

That's one thing that concerns me about TSP - it's pretty much all "index" type funds & I'm wondering if we might be entering a new market environment wherein "index" investing will not necessarily continue to be such a good idea over a ten+ year time frame as opposed to something like TIPS or individual stocks in solid companies (i.e large well established companies that produce common things people have to or will always be buying).

The TIPS thing is just an idea that crossed my mind I've been reading so much about them lately. I recognize that I am increasingly financially conservative & don't expect I'll make any rash decisions without a lot of research & pondering about it first.

The government printing so much money (willy-nilly it seems) lately & planning to print so much more has me quite uneasy about the next ten to twenty years.

(and sometimes I kick back in my recliner, put on my tin-foil hat, and fantasize about cashing it all in - eating the taxes & penalties - & spending the whole lot on silver & gold Eagles a month before a precipitous & unforseen total economic collapse of the world financial system & the US dollar but then I wake up & realize that would make me a dirty-market-timer! )
__________________
Retired 2009!
Texarkandy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2009, 10:52 PM   #11
Recycles dryer sheets
Gardnr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: ENE MO - near STL
Posts: 424
Leaving aside (for now) the discussion of whether you should go with some equity exposure to fend off inflation...

The G fund is a very unique instrument that only the U.S. gov't can really offer. You get long term rates (average maturity of 11 yrs) while investing in short term securities (1 to 4 days maturity). So you get longer term rates with no interest rate risk and obviously no credit risk.

Theoretically it's supposed to beat inflation (a stated objective of the fund) so you shouldn't have to worry about that. And since you get the benefit of increased rates as they rise, with no risk of principal loss, as long as the treasury bond market reflects inflation over the long term (which it is "supposed" to) that should bear out. And you get very low expenses and no custodial risk, as bamshpd pointed out.

I think that the G fund is a very underappreciated investment vehicle.

I don't see why you (or I) would need to go to TIPS vs. the G fund. But maybe I'm missing something. I'd be interested also to hear any info that would contradict my understanding of the situation.
__________________
Gardnr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2009, 11:03 PM   #12
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Texarkandy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 1,281
The G-Fund can theoretically lose principle in a deflationary environment can it not? - I cant' say I've ever read where "no-loss-of-principal" is guaranteed by the G-Fund, and I don't see where there is any guarantee the G-Fund will always pace inflation either.

My understanding is the G Fund is special short term bonds that pay an average of the rates of short, medium, & long term bonds put together.

I read somewhere recently (tsptalk.com ?) that the TSP board made a change a couple years ago to weight that average more toward the short-term bond rates.
__________________
Retired 2009!
Texarkandy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2009, 04:58 AM   #13
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Tadpole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 1,169
The G fund went below 4% in 2008 for the ?first time? I can remember. I expect lower in 2009.

But hyperinflation (runaway inflation) is something I truly wonder about. How can a government ultimately pay the inflation component of all the TIPS/I bonds out there if there is hyperinflation without creating more hyperinflation?

While musing, I have a question for people in the know. I have some TIP fund holdings in my TIAA-CREF and my husband's Fidelity 401K. Only bond funds are offered in the plans. Will the funds keep up with inflation/hyperinflation if the individual bonds and securities keep up with inflation/hyperinflation? Are the funds similar in behavior to bonds and securities?
__________________
Tadpole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2009, 08:15 AM   #14
Full time employment: Posting here.
Lakedog's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 654
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texarkandy View Post
The G-Fund can theoretically lose principle in a deflationary environment can it not? - I cant' say I've ever read where "no-loss-of-principal" is guaranteed by the G-Fund...
From G-fund information sheet on the TSP website:

"The G Fund offers the opportunity to earn rates of interest similar to those of long-term Government securities but without any risk of loss of principal and very little volatility of earnings."
__________________
Lakedog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2009, 08:42 AM   #15
Recycles dryer sheets
Gardnr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: ENE MO - near STL
Posts: 424
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texarkandy View Post
The G-Fund can theoretically lose principle in a deflationary environment can it not? - I cant' say I've ever read where "no-loss-of-principal" is guaranteed by the G-Fund, and I don't see where there is any guarantee the G-Fund will always pace inflation either.

My understanding is the G Fund is special short term bonds that pay an average of the rates of short, medium, & long term bonds put together.

I read somewhere recently (tsptalk.com ?) that the TSP board made a change a couple years ago to weight that average more toward the short-term bond rates.
I'm just quoting the info from the TSP site. Why would there be a loss of principal due to deflation? Besides, I thought your concern was inflation. Seriously, principal is guaranteed and it will pay the market rate for treasuries (as outlined below) so you'll not lose out in a deflationary environment.

From the fact sheet:
Quote:
The G Fund rate is calculated by the U.S. Treasury as the weighted average yield of approximately 76 U.S. Treasury securities on the last day of the previous month. The yield of the security has a weight in the G Fund rate calculation based on the amount outstanding. (The larger the dollar amount of a security outstanding, the larger its weight in the calculation.)
The Treasury securities used in the G Fund rate calculation have a weighted average maturity of approximately 11 years.
According to the fact sheet the return has outpaced inflation by almost 2 times since inception in '87. I know it all seems too good to be true but the bottom line is that this is a very special instrument that the fed gov't puts together. Anything can change in the future, of course, but this is the way it's put together as of now. And it would take extraordinary circumstances for that to change, IMHO.

http://www.tsp.gov/rates/fundsheet-gfund.pdf

Edit: I don't know why the link won't take you directly to the fact sheet, but you can get there by clicking on the fund sheet link to the right side of the TSP web site home page.
__________________
Gardnr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2009, 09:21 AM   #16
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Texarkandy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 1,281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gardnr View Post
....

Edit: I don't know why the link won't take you directly to the fact sheet, but you can get there by clicking on the fund sheet link to the right side of the TSP web site home page.

Any page on the TSP site will do that - I don't know why either.

I know what all the fact sheets say - it's what they might not say that concerns me.
__________________
Retired 2009!
Texarkandy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2009, 09:30 AM   #17
Moderator
ziggy29's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 15,612
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gardnr View Post
According to the fact sheet the return has outpaced inflation by almost 2 times since inception in '87. I know it all seems too good to be true but the bottom line is that this is a very special instrument that the fed gov't puts together. Anything can change in the future, of course, but this is the way it's put together as of now. And it would take extraordinary circumstances for that to change, IMHO.
I have to assume this is pretty heavily subsidized or with the government assuming all loss or risk. If it were possible to construct a mutual fund like this with no risk to principal that consistently paid on the long end of Treasury yields, it would be ridiculously popular. Thus I have to conclude that there is no money to be made from such a fund, and that it is therefore subsidized (either in terms of expenses or assuming risk).
__________________
"Hey, for every ten dollars, that's another hour that I have to be in the work place. That's an hour of my life. And my life is a very finite thing. I have only 'x' number of hours left before I'm dead. So how do I want to use these hours of my life? Do I want to use them just spending it on more crap and more stuff, or do I want to start getting a handle on it and using my life more intelligently?" -- Joe Dominguez (1938 - 1997)

RIP to Reemy, my avatar dog (2003 - 9/16/2017)
ziggy29 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2009, 10:39 AM   #18
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
FIRE'd@51's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 2,315
Quote:
Originally Posted by ziggy29 View Post
I have to assume this is pretty heavily subsidized or with the government assuming all loss or risk. If it were possible to construct a mutual fund like this with no risk to principal that consistently paid on the long end of Treasury yields, it would be ridiculously popular. Thus I have to conclude that there is no money to be made from such a fund, and that it is therefore subsidized (either in terms of expenses or assuming risk).
For the most part, 1987 until now has been a period of secularly declining interest rates on Treasury securities. It's also been a period of relatively high real rates on short-term Treasury securities. Should we enter a period of higher inflation and secularly rising interest rates, my guess is that the G-Fund payout will substantially lag market rates, as the fund will reinvest a greater and greater portion of its earned interest at those higher rates in an attempt ot keep the fund price "stable". This is only a guess, as I have no familiarity with the G-Fund other than what's been posted here. Short of a government subsidy, I don't see what else the fund can do.
__________________
FIRE'd@51 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2009, 10:44 AM   #19
Recycles dryer sheets
Gardnr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: ENE MO - near STL
Posts: 424
Quote:
Originally Posted by ziggy29 View Post
I have to assume this is pretty heavily subsidized or with the government assuming all loss or risk. If it were possible to construct a mutual fund like this with no risk to principal that consistently paid on the long end of Treasury yields, it would be ridiculously popular. Thus I have to conclude that there is no money to be made from such a fund, and that it is therefore subsidized (either in terms of expenses or assuming risk).
Oh, yes, there's no doubt that it's subsidized by the fed gov't. That's clearly the case. You couldn't possibly run a bond fund like this without that. But that's exactly the point and why it's such a good deal. You have the U.S. gov't backing this up and thus making it the safest deal around. Just like treasuries.

It's only available in the TSP. A very good deal indeed.
__________________
Gardnr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2009, 10:48 AM   #20
Recycles dryer sheets
Gardnr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: ENE MO - near STL
Posts: 424
Quote:
Originally Posted by FIRE'd@51 View Post
For the most part, 1987 until now has been a period of secularly declining interest rates on Treasury securities. It's also been a period of relatively high real rates on short-term Treasury securities. Should we enter a period of higher inflation and secularly rising interest rates, my guess is that the G-Fund payout will substantially lag market rates, as the fund will reinvest a greater and greater portion of its earned interest at those higher rates in an attempt ot keep the fund price "stable". This is only a guess, as I have no familiarity with the G-Fund other than what's been posted here. Short of a government subsidy, I don't see what else the fund can do.
It does seem too good to be true. But remember (or realize if you're not familiar with it), this is the U.S. gov't running this and backing it up. It doesn't have to follow normal market rules. It's backed and subsidized by the full faith and credit of our gov't. You cannot compare it to anything else out there.
__________________

__________________
Gardnr is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
is anyone else doing this with their IRA's? Mikedb FIRE and Money 17 10-28-2008 04:10 PM
Roth IRA's laurinsane FIRE and Money 24 04-12-2008 08:38 AM
TIPS tip: nix the TIPs, they're worth zip. pedorrero FIRE and Money 7 05-13-2007 01:00 PM
When you don't have IRA's modhatter FIRE and Money 5 02-17-2006 11:07 PM
TIPS vs. Mutual Fund with TIPS? Telly FIRE and Money 12 07-16-2003 12:21 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:38 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.