Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 10-01-2012, 06:11 PM   #61
Moderator
Ronstar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: A little ways southwest of Chicago
Posts: 9,356
I agree with others about online research. Lots more available helpful information now compared to 30 or so years ago. I go to forums specific to make/brand. Yesterday I downloaded info on how to pull diagnostic codes. Did that and diagnosed a problem. Researched the problem, and tomorrow i'll remove a faulty module and send it off for repair for approx $150 as opposed to $1000 in repairs from a dealer.
__________________

__________________
Ronstar is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 10-01-2012, 06:14 PM   #62
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
travelover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 9,897
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronstar View Post
I agree with others about online research. Lots more available helpful information now compared to 30 or so years ago. I go to forums specific to make/brand. Yesterday I downloaded info on how to pull diagnostic codes. Did that and diagnosed a problem. Researched the problem, and tomorrow i'll remove a faulty module and send it off for repair for approx $150 as opposed to $1000 in repairs from a dealer.
Right. The collective knowledge of the end users is greater than the dealer mechanic's.
__________________

__________________
Yes, I have achieved work / life balance.
travelover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 06:28 PM   #63
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Finance Dave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,046
Quote:
Originally Posted by steve88 View Post
Is there a reason why the oil need to be changed if you dont drive the car often? A 5000 mile oil thats in the car, Should that be changed if the car sat in the driveway? thanks
The oil sits in an oil pan on the car. The oil pan has some oil, but also has air in it. As you know, air contains moisture, also called humidity. When temperatures change, that humidity settles out and condenses into water, which then gets in the oil. It's not a lot of water, but enough to cause problems over time.

Now, if you don't drive the car, that's a bit different....I'd be ok with leaving the oil in there quite some time, just be sure to change it before (or very soon after) you start driving it.
__________________
"Live every day as if it were your last, and one day you'll be right" - unknown
Finance Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 06:38 PM   #64
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Finance Dave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,046
Quote:
Originally Posted by youbet View Post

Help me with this one. Since cold wires have less resistance than warm wires, how would warming the wires get you extra "oomph" from your car battery?

The battery being warmer would help, but not the wires.

Or is there something else going on here?
Focus on the battery.
__________________
"Live every day as if it were your last, and one day you'll be right" - unknown
Finance Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 06:40 PM   #65
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Finance Dave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,046
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronstar View Post
I agree with others about online research. Lots more available helpful information now compared to 30 or so years ago. I go to forums specific to make/brand. Yesterday I downloaded info on how to pull diagnostic codes. Did that and diagnosed a problem. Researched the problem, and tomorrow i'll remove a faulty module and send it off for repair for approx $150 as opposed to $1000 in repairs from a dealer.
Great!

As I said before, though, be careful. Sometimes a sensor will show a fault, and it's not necessarily the root cause. For example, let's say you put a tester on and it says the O2 sensor is reading rich. So you change the O2 sensor.

Then you drive the car, and you get the same fault. Ah ha, maybe it's reading rich because one of the injector tips broke off, and the engine is dumping excess fuel into the cylinder.

Always look for root cause.
__________________
"Live every day as if it were your last, and one day you'll be right" - unknown
Finance Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 06:41 PM   #66
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
imoldernu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Peru
Posts: 4,616
I take the "save on vehicle costs" from a different standpoint. Buying the vehicle in the first place.
Together, my cars are 47 years old.
98 Town car bought 2000 w.14,000 miles for $17000... now 110,000 mi.
96 Cadillac SLS bought 2006 w/35000 mile for $5000... now 67,000 mi.
96 Mercury Grand Marquis bought 2011 w/60,000 mi $2500 now 63,000 mi.

Total current book value probably less than $5000 for all three.







We love big cars, the luxury ride, roomy cargo space (travel back and forth to FL, and the extra gee gaws... including premium sound systems.

Total shop cost for all three together, about $4,000... I do brakes, fluids, and small stuff. Website for almost any kind of repair possible. Like ignition problem in the SLS... $700 quote from dealer... solved with a $.75 resistor from Radio Shack (and some incredible pretzel body twists to get to it.

We bought the Marquis as "insurance" in case of major problems with either the Lincoln or the Cadillac, thinking it was better to buy when we didn't need it , than to HAVE to buy under pressure. Right now, except for one missing hubcap, all are in excellent condition. BTW... neither the Caddy nor the Marquis ever spent a night outside of a garage. (Estate Cars).

I run regular gas in all cars, get good mileage (for big old cars) and never have a ping. The Caddy gets 29mpg under cruise control, and for an old geezer like me, has plenty of pep 0-60 in 6.4 sec.

I expect 150M miles on the Cadillac, 175M miles on the Lincoln, and 150M miles on the Marquis. @ 10,000mi. per yr. avg driving, we'll never get a chance to buy a new car... Sad
Bummer...
__________________
imoldernu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 06:43 PM   #67
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Finance Dave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,046
Quote:
Originally Posted by travelover View Post
Right. The collective knowledge of the end users is greater than the dealer mechanic's.
Sometimes it's just hard sorting through the differences of opinion. For example, I have a ring/pinion noise in my Mustang. Search the internet and tell me what's wrong LOL...there are 100 people with 100 different things that can cause it... (ok, so I'm exaggerating lol)...but the point is that sometimes there's no substitute for a good ole in-person diagnosis by a highly qualified technician.

I just keep warning because I watch my MIL self-diagnose her medical conditions this way. She says "My chest hurts, and when I search the internet for 'chest hurts', it says I'm having a heart attack".

She's had 23 heart attacks in the past year.
__________________
"Live every day as if it were your last, and one day you'll be right" - unknown
Finance Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 06:45 PM   #68
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Finance Dave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,046
imolder, great way to save...that's the Dave Ramsey approach lol.
__________________
"Live every day as if it were your last, and one day you'll be right" - unknown
Finance Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 06:58 PM   #69
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
travelover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 9,897
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finance Dave View Post
Sometimes it's just hard sorting through the differences of opinion.........

Also true, but some issues are common to a particular model.

  • The "wrench light" came on in my Escape hybrid, forum said it was the blend door for the battery. I replaced it and nailed it.
  • I was getting false ABS trigger on stopping, forum said cracked tone ring. I replaced it and nailed it.
  • My front suspension was clunking and forum said stabilizer links. I replaced them and nailed it.

I agree on a weird problem that you need first hand knowledge, but for problems common to a given model, the most common problem for that make and model is the first thing to check.
__________________
Yes, I have achieved work / life balance.
travelover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 07:05 PM   #70
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
imoldernu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Peru
Posts: 4,616
O2 sensor... agree... depending on the car, can be almost anything. My SLS has 3 O2 sensors... replacement would be $1000+... The problem is endemic with my car... solved by opening the MAP sensor, and using electronics cleaning fluid on the tiny wire sensors.
Happens again in about 5-6000 miles, or after long idling. Mostly, I just wait for the OBD2 computer to reset after about 20 start-ups. Fortunately the Cadillac has a built in, user accessible diagnostic program. For the other cars, I use an engine analyzer $37... a worthwhile purchase.
Hang around, Dave... am pretty sure you'll be in demand...

BTW... Your opinion on ceramic vs. standard disc brake pads... After putting in ceramics, found out that after heavy hilly usage, that the discs were cut so badly they had to be replaced. (walls too thin to be refinished).
__________________
imoldernu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 07:17 PM   #71
Moderator
Ronstar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: A little ways southwest of Chicago
Posts: 9,356
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finance Dave
Great!

As I said before, though, be careful. Sometimes a sensor will show a fault, and it's not necessarily the root cause. For example, let's say you put a tester on and it says the O2 sensor is reading rich. So you change the O2 sensor.

Then you drive the car, and you get the same fault. Ah ha, maybe it's reading rich because one of the injector tips broke off, and the engine is dumping excess fuel into the cylinder.

Always look for root cause.
Good point!

The Electronic Body Control Module in my corvette could be caused by a corroded ground or corroded connector. I was getting sporadic warnings on the dash, but continuous warnings after the most recent car wash. So I'm going to check connections first. Also going to try to check battery voltage - the module needs full battery voltage to,operate properly. So I'm going to try these 2 things before I yank out the module.
__________________
Ronstar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 07:30 PM   #72
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 241
Sweet cars. Thanks for the pix Finance Dave.

My only tip is to keep your car a long time (assuming it's not too expensive to keep it going). We have two Hondas, one is 15 years old, the other is 11 years old, and they are solid, reliable, cheap transportation. Only carry collision and comprehensive since the cars have a low book value. My son is a mechanic and does most of the maintenance on the cars for us (brakes, oil, filters, etc.) We don't change the timing belt or water pump ourselves. 15 year old is on its second new timing belt/water pump (every 7 years). Those are our daily drivers. For my midlife crisis car I have a Porsche Cayman....I love the muscle cars but I also love my baby Porsche.
__________________
MDJO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 07:33 PM   #73
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
martyb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Bossier City
Posts: 2,182
Quote:
Originally Posted by 73ss454 View Post
On my 2010 4 cyl Camry the oil change calls for 10K. But it does use synthetic oil 0W20. I still do it every 5K as I can't bring myself to go that long. What are your thoughts on this?
I read Finance Dave's reply to your question. I also have a 2010 Camry (SE) 4 cyl. and have been doing the 10k synthetic oil change thing. Also felt a little uncomfortable with it, since all my life I've always changed at either 3000 or 5000 miles (with non-synthetic). I've got about 62k miles on my Camry now, and am seriously thinking about going back to the 5000 mile oil change, even with synthetic. Wife's '07 Camry gets non-syn oil & 5000 mile changes.
__________________
“Change is the law of life. And those who look only to the past or present are certain to miss the future.”
-John F. Kennedy

“Hard work never killed anybody, but why take a chance?” - Edgar Bergen
martyb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 07:47 PM   #74
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso) Give me a forum ...
REWahoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Texas Hill Country
Posts: 42,125
Quote:
Originally Posted by 73ss454 View Post
On my 2010 4 cyl Camry the oil change calls for 10K. But it does use synthetic oil 0W20. I still do it every 5K as I can't bring myself to go that long. What are your thoughts on this?
I'm not Finance Dave, I don't use synthetic oil and I don't drive a Camry, but I'm still gonna chime in.

I have a 2004 Chevy purchased new and I've always followed the "10% oil life remaining" notifications on my computer. The notification comes on between 7,500 and 8,500 miles and that's been the interval between all my oil changes. The odometer now reads just over 100k and the car uses no oil.

Based on my experience I'd say going 10K between changes on synthetic oil is fine. But then a guy with a stash the size of yours can afford to change it once a month, eh?
__________________
Numbers is hard

When I hit 70, it hit back

Retired in 2005 at age 58, no pension
REWahoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 08:01 PM   #75
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Bikerdude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,901
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finance Dave View Post
No exact number...but probably 2000 and newer. The engine tolerances have been very tight for quite some time.
Consumer Reports did an oil life study on NYC Taxi's in 1996. They found no difference in engine wear with 3,000 or 6,000 mile oil change intervals. Like REW my vehicles have an oil life monitor and indicate oil change needed between 7500 and 9000 miles. Personally, I would not go more than a year between changes no matter what the miles.
__________________
“I guess I should warn you, if I turn out to be particularly clear, you've probably misunderstood what I've said” Alan Greenspan
Bikerdude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 08:06 PM   #76
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
73ss454's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: LaLa Land
Posts: 4,378
Quote:
Originally Posted by martyb View Post
I read Finance Dave's reply to your question. I also have a 2010 Camry (SE) 4 cyl. and have been doing the 10k synthetic oil change thing. Also felt a little uncomfortable with it, since all my life I've always changed at either 3000 or 5000 miles (with non-synthetic). I've got about 62k miles on my Camry now, and am seriously thinking about going back to the 5000 mile oil change, even with synthetic. Wife's '07 Camry gets non-syn oil & 5000 mile changes.
If you have been doing the oil changes at 10K with no problems I would continue to stay on that pace. I change mine at 5K but I don't think there is any good reason for doing so. Seems that the Synthetic does not break down like the non-synthetic oils.
__________________
Work is something you do to get enough $ so you don't have to....Me.
73ss454 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 08:14 PM   #77
Moderator Emeritus
Nords's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Oahu
Posts: 26,619
Quote:
Originally Posted by REWahoo View Post
I have a 2004 Chevy purchased new and I've always followed the "10% oil life remaining" notifications on my computer. The notification comes on between 7,500 and 8,500 miles and that's been the interval between all my oil changes. The odometer now reads just over 100k and the car uses no oil.
Our Priuses just have a "Maintenance required" light that turns itself on every 5000 miles.

I think it cries "Wolf!" too...
__________________
*
*

The book written on E-R.org, "The Military Guide to Financial Independence and Retirement", on sale now! For more info see "About Me" in my profile.
I don't spend much time here anymore, so please send me a PM. Thanks.
Nords is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 09:40 PM   #78
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 11,615
With an older/higher mileage car there's going to be more blow-by past the rings and that means more combustion by-products building up in the oil (whether it's synthetic or not). I'm not driving as much anymore, so I change the oil in my well-used Camry in the fall (to 5W30) and in the spring (to 10W40). Plain 'ol conventional Castrol. I'm changing it at about 3K miles or less, but oil and filters are fairly cheap and engine work is expensive. New oil gets me all the other additives (antirust, antisludging/detergent, lubricity, etc) that can be especially important in a car that isn't run very much and is often used for short trips so the engine may not get up to optimum temps.
__________________
"Freedom begins when you tell Mrs. Grundy to go fly a kite." - R. Heinlein
samclem is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 10:38 PM   #79
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Finance Dave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,046
Quote:
Originally Posted by travelover View Post
Also true, but some issues are common to a particular model.

  • The "wrench light" came on in my Escape hybrid, forum said it was the blend door for the battery. I replaced it and nailed it.
  • I was getting false ABS trigger on stopping, forum said cracked tone ring. I replaced it and nailed it.
  • My front suspension was clunking and forum said stabilizer links. I replaced them and nailed it.
I agree on a weird problem that you need first hand knowledge, but for problems common to a given model, the most common problem for that make and model is the first thing to check.
Are you saying that you mentioned clunking in a forum and every response was stabilizer links? I find that difficult to believe, as there are numerous things that can cause clunking in a front suspension...which is why I made the comment about sorting through all the opinions to find one that fixes your issue. In your case, you're more technical than most...and can do this on your own...but many are not so knowledgeable about all things mechanical.
__________________
"Live every day as if it were your last, and one day you'll be right" - unknown
Finance Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2012, 10:44 PM   #80
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Finance Dave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,046
Quote:
Originally Posted by imoldernu View Post

BTW... Your opinion on ceramic vs. standard disc brake pads... After putting in ceramics, found out that after heavy hilly usage, that the discs were cut so badly they had to be replaced. (walls too thin to be refinished).
Yes, we've moved through three materials in brake pads...in order...

1) Organic
2) Semi-metallic
3) Ceramic (not truly ceramic, but they have ceramic pieces in them)

As you go up in numbers (above), the materials get harder, and thus wear the rotors faster. The big advantage to semi-metallics was their resistance to brake fade...so they were great on road race cars and those who lived in mountainous areas.

I've never had ceramic pads on a car of mine, but I can see how they would wear rotors very quickly.

And yes, as I mentioned in one of my tips (which I may not have posted yet LOL), the rotors are made thinner today than in the past to save on weight and thus fuel.

Oh, and automatic trans cars are harder on brakes than manual trans cars. Why? Well, at a traffic light you have to (ok, well you don't HAVE to, but most people do) keep your foot on the brake or the car moves forward...thus you are keeping heat in the rotors. With a manual trans, you can (at least on a flat road), take your foot off the brake when you stop, thus the rotors cool more/quicker....reducing brake wear.

I did brake jobs for about 8-9 years...averaged 2 jobs/day...and on average a manual trans car would go about 20% further on a set of brakes based on what I saw.

Sorry I can't be more help on ceramic pads.
__________________

__________________
"Live every day as if it were your last, and one day you'll be right" - unknown
Finance Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:53 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.