Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-25-2014, 10:42 AM   #21
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 1,182
Last summer we bought a dozen from Home Depot in bulk to replace our 11 and 18 year old models. I have all of them changed out in both houses with about 1 1/2 hours labor. Cheap insurance.
__________________

__________________
"What's the worst thing that could happen - I keep my job."
foxfirev5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 11-27-2014, 01:09 PM   #22
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 520
We actually have a very old one we left up in our personal home--Its not really a smoke detector, its a fire alarm. Has a wound up spring that releases a hammer mechanism when a bit of metal with a low melting point lets go.
__________________

__________________
ArkTinkerer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2014, 03:16 PM   #23
Recycles dryer sheets
GalaxyBoy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: The Beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains
Posts: 397
As a fire protection engineer I'm quite embarrassed I was unaware of the recommendation to replace smoke alarms after ten years. Oh well, I don't do residential work anyway and rarely, if ever, encounter smoke alarms (vs. smoke "detectors," which are by definition connected to a fire alarm control panel as part of a fire detection/alarm system).

And ionization-type smoke alarms containing a very small amount of radioactive material are very much still in production. Most of the smoke alarms installed over the years are of this type simply because they are cheaper than photoelectric.

I'm off to the big box home improvement store AFTER Black Friday to buy replacements. When you design fire protection systems for a living, it would be damn embarrassing to have your house burn down around you while you sleep because twenty bucks worth of equipment had outlived its useful life.
__________________
GalaxyBoy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2014, 03:28 PM   #24
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 10,999
Quote:
Originally Posted by ArkTinkerer View Post
We actually have a very old one we left up in our personal home--Its not really a smoke detector, its a fire alarm. Has a wound up spring that releases a hammer mechanism when a bit of metal with a low melting point lets go.
Pretty neat, I've never seen one of those. Probably not very sensitive, but nothing to go out of date (unless the spring takes a "set" and loses it's "umph").

The modern smoke detectors are really a marvel of technology/low cost. In the "life-years saved per dollar" department, they've got to be near the top.
__________________
"Freedom begins when you tell Mrs. Grundy to go fly a kite." - R. Heinlein
samclem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2014, 05:18 PM   #25
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 81
Our HOA did repairs to several units due to ice dam damage. Part of the work required removing / reinstalling water heaters. This required pulling permits and an inspection when the work was done to get a final sign-off.

Even though the permit had nothing to do with smoke / CO detectors, the inspector verified they were present in the required locations (near bedrooms, every level of home, etc.), and even pushed the test button to confirm they worked.

I feel better knowing that everyone has working detectors - a surprising number of our neighbors had just pulled them down when the low battery "beep" started!
__________________
BrianB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2014, 05:29 PM   #26
Moderator
Walt34's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Eastern WV Panhandle
Posts: 14,401
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianB View Post
I feel better knowing that everyone has working detectors - a surprising number of our neighbors had just pulled them down when the low battery "beep" started!
__________________
I heard the call to do nothing. So I answered it.
Walt34 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2014, 06:33 PM   #27
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Treasure Coast
Posts: 241
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianB View Post
Our HOA did repairs to several units due to ice dam damage. Part of the work required removing / reinstalling water heaters. This required pulling permits and an inspection when the work was done to get a final sign-off.

Even though the permit had nothing to do with smoke / CO detectors, the inspector verified they were present in the required locations (near bedrooms, every level of home, etc.), and even pushed the test button to confirm they worked.

I feel better knowing that everyone has working detectors - a surprising number of our neighbors had just pulled them down when the low battery "beep" started!
This post made me remember something that happened in our condo. Seems a number of years ago there was a storm that damaged the ceiling drywall because the roof leaked. The centralized smoke/fire alarm system was acting up recently, so they did testing. During this process, they discovered that the smoke detector for the master bedroom had been placed on top of ductwork and then the drywall put up over the ductwork. They made it right, but one wonders why the inspectors we hired for the purchase did not notice a missing smoke detector. The building is completely sprinklered, and we also discovered that a head was missing in a somewhat obscure (but important) spot. Apparently since the place was built.

Reminds me that instead of just changing the batteries once a year, one should sit down from time to time and review all safety systems. Another one-how long has it been since you checked the fire extinguisher in your kitchen? You do have one, don't you?
__________________
45th Birthday is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2014, 07:54 PM   #28
Recycles dryer sheets
cooch96's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Lakewood
Posts: 286
I haven't lived in a place with working smoke detectors since I was stationed in Missouri, I think. That would've been fourteen years ago. I've been dismantling them everywhere I moved. I remember them being so darn sensitive that they'd go off from the shower steam after opening the bathroom door. I figured it was safer to not have a smoke alarm than clambering around on a stool with my fingers in my ears and a wet towel around my waist.
__________________
Why be normal when you can be yourself?
cooch96 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2014, 08:04 PM   #29
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 10,999
Quote:
Originally Posted by cooch96 View Post
I remember them being so darn sensitive that they'd go off from the shower steam after opening the bathroom door.
Maybe move it to a place where that won't happen? I guarantee there are some in your abode if it's larger than 1 room.
Obviously, if there's anyone else living with you, or if you live in a multi-unit structure, there are other people affected by this decision you are making.
__________________
"Freedom begins when you tell Mrs. Grundy to go fly a kite." - R. Heinlein
samclem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2014, 11:02 PM   #30
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 520
Quote:
Originally Posted by 45th Birthday View Post
Reminds me that instead of just changing the batteries once a year, one should sit down from time to time and review all safety systems. Another one-how long has it been since you checked the fire extinguisher in your kitchen? You do have one, don't you?
From keeping rental property we have commercial extinguishers in those houses as well as our own. They get tested/charged every year. We check the detectors at the same time. Amazing how many batteries are missing every year.
__________________
ArkTinkerer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2014, 04:57 AM   #31
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 1,129
Quote:
Originally Posted by cooch96 View Post
I haven't lived in a place with working smoke detectors since I was stationed in Missouri, I think. That would've been fourteen years ago. I've been dismantling them everywhere I moved. I remember them being so darn sensitive that they'd go off from the shower steam after opening the bathroom door. I figured it was safer to not have a smoke alarm than clambering around on a stool with my fingers in my ears and a wet towel around my waist.
Hopefully you don't live in an apartment building or an attached condo. I wouldn't want you as my neighbor.....
__________________
Corporateburnout is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2014, 07:37 AM   #32
Recycles dryer sheets
GalaxyBoy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: The Beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains
Posts: 397
Quote:
Originally Posted by cooch96 View Post
I haven't lived in a place with working smoke detectors since I was stationed in Missouri, I think. That would've been fourteen years ago. I've been dismantling them everywhere I moved. I remember them being so darn sensitive that they'd go off from the shower steam after opening the bathroom door. I figured it was safer to not have a smoke alarm than clambering around on a stool with my fingers in my ears and a wet towel around my waist.
Try replacing the ionization detector with a photoelectric type. Also note that code requires detectors to be at least 36" from doors to bathrooms containing showers, although I don't think 36" will necessarily prevent the problem.

Just don't wake up dead from smoke inhalation!
__________________
GalaxyBoy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2014, 11:43 AM   #33
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 282
I stayed at a hotel once where the fan in the bathroom was not functioning. So when I took my shower the steam caused the room alarm to go off. I had a 6:00 am flight so was showering at 4:00 am. I'm sure everyone appreciated that.


I hate that new detectors never seem to fit on the plates of the old ones. So you either have multiple plates or holes in your walls. CO2 detectors plug into outlets. I wish the had smoke detectors that did too but have not seen them. Our house has one over the upstairs stairwell. There is no way you can reach it to change the batteries. The low battery alert will continue for a long time.....
__________________
Idnar7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2014, 12:21 PM   #34
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 520
Quote:
Originally Posted by Idnar7 View Post
CO2 detectors plug into outlets. I wish the had smoke detectors that did too but have not seen them. Our house has one over the upstairs stairwell. There is no way you can reach it to change the batteries. The low battery alert will continue for a long time.....
Smoke detectors need to be at the ceiling. They could plug in but how many people have outlets on their ceilings? Plugging them in 18" above the floor would not give you much advanced notice. We do have hard wired (AC) powered units in parts of our home now. We had AC with battery back up but this latest round we went straight AC.
__________________
ArkTinkerer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2014, 12:27 PM   #35
Recycles dryer sheets
GalaxyBoy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: The Beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains
Posts: 397
Quote:
Originally Posted by Idnar7 View Post
CO2 detectors plug into outlets. I wish the had smoke detectors that did too but have not seen them.
Wouldn't work and would violate code. Smoke from a hot fire rises and banks down from the ceiling, so the detector has to be at ceiling level to respond. CO (not CO2, by the way) would typically be from a fuel-burning appliance and would mix with air, fairly quickly reaching ambient temperature, so the detector can go at any level.
__________________
GalaxyBoy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2014, 01:53 PM   #36
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 1,129
Quote:
Originally Posted by ArkTinkerer View Post
Smoke detectors need to be at the ceiling. They could plug in but how many people have outlets on their ceilings? Plugging them in 18" above the floor would not give you much advanced notice. We do have hard wired (AC) powered units in parts of our home now. We had AC with battery back up but this latest round we went straight AC.
I wasn't aware that hardwired smoke and CO detectors are available without battery backup.

So what happens in case of a fire or carbon monoxide leak with a power outage? Do you have a power generator?
__________________
Corporateburnout is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2014, 03:01 PM   #37
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 10,999
Quote:
Originally Posted by GalaxyBoy View Post
Wouldn't work and would violate code. Smoke from a hot fire rises and banks down from the ceiling, so the detector has to be at ceiling level to respond.
It >might< work. I've got an odd receptacle in my LR that is on the wall about 5" below the ceiling. The house was built in 1959, so it surely wasn't for a smoke detector, but I don't know what its purpose is/was. Maybe a plug from a swag lamp?

But I agree, this is an oddity.
__________________
"Freedom begins when you tell Mrs. Grundy to go fly a kite." - R. Heinlein
samclem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2014, 03:12 PM   #38
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
travelover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 8,680
Quote:
Originally Posted by samclem View Post
It >might< work. I've got an odd receptacle in my LR that is on the wall about 5" below the ceiling. The house was built in 1959, so it surely wasn't for a smoke detector, but I don't know what its purpose is/was. Maybe a plug from a swag lamp?

But I agree, this is an oddity.
It used to be common to put clock outlets high on the wall. Usually they are a single outlet with a hook formed into the cover, at the top.
__________________
Yes, I have achieved work / life balance.
travelover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2014, 03:17 PM   #39
Moderator
Walt34's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Eastern WV Panhandle
Posts: 14,401
Quote:
Originally Posted by travelover View Post
It used to be common to put clock outlets high on the wall. Usually they are a single outlet with a hook formed into the cover, at the top.
I had forgotten about that but my parent's house had one like that in the kitchen over one of the cabinets. And the clock plugged into it.
__________________
I heard the call to do nothing. So I answered it.
Walt34 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2014, 03:53 PM   #40
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 10,999
Quote:
Originally Posted by travelover View Post
It used to be common to put clock outlets high on the wall. Usually they are a single outlet with a hook formed into the cover, at the top.
Good guess. We've got some of those, too, but all have a single recpt and are inset into the wall (so the clock can be flush with the wall). The mystery receptacle is a duplex and oriented horizontally.
__________________

__________________
"Freedom begins when you tell Mrs. Grundy to go fly a kite." - R. Heinlein
samclem is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Annoying smoke detectors Corporateburnout Other topics 8 01-07-2013 12:19 PM
Turkey - smoke that sucker! unclemick Other topics 29 11-28-2008 12:21 PM
Smoke detector malfunction Corporateburnout Other topics 15 01-08-2007 01:22 PM
metal detectors and treasure hunting maddythebeagle Other topics 30 08-14-2006 03:31 PM
Smoke Alarms wabmester Other topics 6 01-08-2005 05:33 AM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:54 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.