Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
starting TIPS ladder in Roth
Old 08-27-2010, 01:34 PM   #1
Dryer sheet wannabe
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 16
starting TIPS ladder in Roth

Late to the game. Just learning & looking for some feedback. I'm single, soon be 54, thinking that I'll be working 8-9 more years. SS, 403b, small Roth, and small taxable savings will be sources of income. I'm planning to fully fund my Roth each year until retirement ($6000/yr). Anyone have an opinion on buying TIPS at auction each year until retirement so that I slowly create a (very small) "ladder"? The past few years have convinced me that I want more security & less risk.

Thanks!
__________________

__________________
want2er is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 08-27-2010, 04:24 PM   #2
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 5,072
There are TIPS mutual funds. VG has a low cost fund.
__________________

__________________
chinaco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-2010, 05:25 PM   #3
Dryer sheet wannabe
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 16
Thanks, Chinaco. Several folks on Bogleheads also recommended bond funds. I'll check them out.
__________________
want2er is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-2010, 05:50 PM   #4
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 281
The drawback with bond fund is they never mature. With buying TIPS at auction and owning them directly one of the advantages is that you get the par value back when they mature. They can go up in value with inflation, but they have a floor of par so it limits your downside risk.
__________________
TooFrugal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-2010, 06:40 PM   #5
Dryer sheet wannabe
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by TooFrugal View Post
The drawback with bond fund is they never mature. With buying TIPS at auction and owning them directly one of the advantages is that you get the par value back when they mature. They can go up in value with inflation, but they have a floor of par so it limits your downside risk.
Too Frugal,

That was my understanding & the reason that I'm thinking of buying/owning the actual TIPS.

Guess I'm just wondering if it makes sense to "slowly" set up a ladder. And if my Roth would be the appropriate place. All the articles that I've read talk about setting up a ladder by taking a lump sum of money & purchasing TIPS of different maturities on the secondary market, then replacing at maturity with TIPS from auction. And some suggest that the Roth would be better for stocks (with potential higher yield?).

Thanks for the feedback!
__________________
want2er is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-2010, 07:56 PM   #6
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 281
We have our own 401K plan for our small businesses set up through Fidelity. It has some drawbacks, but one of the advantages is if you buy TIPS at auction they do not charge a service fee as long as you place the order on your own online.
__________________
TooFrugal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-2010, 08:03 PM   #7
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 8,616
My problem with TIPS is that the yields are at historical lows. See for example St. Louis Fed: Series: DFII10, 10-Year Treasury Inflation-Indexed Security, Constant Maturity Everyone wants them, so there is a bubble in TIPS going on right now. They also only help you with unexpected inflation. All bond funds price in expected inflation, so you get most of the inflation protection offered by TIPS in a regular bond fund.

So if you buy a TIPS fund like Vanguard's VIPSX, you can lose money. If you buy TIPS bonds directly, you don't make any money. You might as well buy a total bond market index fund or GNMAs or a short-term bond fund.

There are times to buy TIPS (when they are cheap), but I don't think now is one of them.

That's my 2 cents.
__________________
LOL! is offline   Reply With Quote
Mental Game
Old 08-27-2010, 08:05 PM   #8
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
MasterBlaster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 4,359
Mental Game

Quote:
Originally Posted by TooFrugal View Post
The drawback with bond fund is they never mature. With buying TIPS at auction and owning them directly one of the advantages is that you get the par value back when they mature. They can go up in value with inflation, but they have a floor of par so it limits your downside risk.
The bond funds get par back also when the bonds mature.

If you hold a bond paying less than market rates you have lost even though your bond doesn't get marked-to-market.

There is no real benefit in holding bonds yourself. To think otherwise is to delude yourself.
__________________
MasterBlaster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-2010, 08:47 PM   #9
Full time employment: Posting here.
Darryl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 577
My and DW Roths are mostly TIPS and we intend to keep maxing Roths with TIPS, was 20yr now 30yr. When I stop believing I will be around 30 yrs in the future we will backfill with shorter maturities. It doesn't matter if you buy at auction (no transaction fee at schwab, fidelity etc.) or on the secondary market. It does matter what real yield you get. TIPS are expensive right now. I was able to buy a 2.25 real in April and regret not filling both accts then. If rates don't improve before I finish filling for 2010 I'll probably just leave in cash in the Roth until I can get 2%+.
As far as needing to put the high potential stocks in Roth (the argument is reasonable) they are high potential because they are higher risk. I look at it from the opposite side as a guy who has limited tax favored space and has suffered some ugly losses on equities in the Roths that space is now gone. If you put a more stable asset in the Roth you get to keep utilizing the space. Put that risky equity in taxable and you can tax loss harvest and get uncle Sam to share the pain.
__________________
I highjacked a rainbow and crashed into a pot of gold - Bon Jovi
Darryl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-2010, 09:12 PM   #10
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 281
Quote:
There is no real benefit in holding bonds yourself. To think otherwise is to delude yourself.
Well, you can make that blanket statement, but I have a lot of books that list detailed pros and cons of bonds verses bond funds, and TIPS versus TIPS funds. There are distinct advantages and disadvantages to each type of investment.

Quote:
It doesn't matter if you buy at auction (no transaction fee at schwab, fidelity etc.) or on the secondary market.
The advantage to the auctions is that the new issue bonds are sold close to par. Some of the TIPS on the secondary market have inflation factors applied, so if there were ever extended deflation you might only get back the par value when the bonds mature.
__________________
TooFrugal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-2010, 09:14 PM   #11
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
haha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Hooverville
Posts: 22,384
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darryl View Post
My and DW Roths are full of TIPS and we intend to keep maxing Roths with TIPS was 20yr now 30yr. When I stop believing I will be around 30 yrs in the future we will backfill with shorter maturities. It doesn't matter if you buy at auction (no transaction fee at schwab, fidelity etc.) or on the secondary market. It does matter what real yield you get. TIPS are expensive right now. I was able to buy a 2.25 real in April and regret not filling both accts then. If rates don't improve before I finish filling for 2010 I'll probably just leave in cash in the Roth until I can get 2%+.
As far as needing to put the high potential stocks in Roth (the argument is reasonable) they are high potential because they are higher risk. I look at it from the opposite side as a guy who has limited tax favored space and has suffered some ugly losses on equities in the Roths that space is now gone. If you put a more stable asset in the Roth you get to keep utilizing the space. Put that risky equity in taxable and you can tax loss harvest and get uncle Sam to share the pain.
Good analysis. I think about this the same way, although I do still like some potential doubles or triples in my Roth. No crap, just quality stuff with perhaps some kicker that might pay off. But your concept of the precious capacity of a Roth is a very good one. IMO, no place to go wild on options. (Though I did buy some VXX in mine earlier this year and got a quick double.) Not on the entire Roth, just on the VXX.

Ha
__________________
"As a general rule, the more dangerous or inappropriate a conversation, the more interesting it is."-Scott Adams
haha is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-2010, 09:17 PM   #12
Full time employment: Posting here.
Darryl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 577
Quote:
Originally Posted by TooFrugal View Post
The advantage to the auctions is that the new issue bonds are sold close to par. Some of the TIPS on the secondary market have inflation factors applied, so if there were ever extended deflation you might only get back the par value when the bonds mature.
Agreed if buying on the secondary and pay over par you are risking the premium.
__________________
I highjacked a rainbow and crashed into a pot of gold - Bon Jovi
Darryl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-2010, 09:21 PM   #13
Full time employment: Posting here.
Darryl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 577
Quote:
Originally Posted by haha View Post
Good analysis. I think about this the same way, although I do still like some potential doubles or triples in my Roth. No crap, just quality stuff with perhaps some kicker that might pay off. But your concept of the precious capacity of a Roth is a very good one. IMO, no place to go wild on options. (Though I did buy some VXX in mine earlier this year and got a quick double.) Not on the entire Roth, just on the VXX.

Ha
Ha Thanks, I only wish I could have developed this philosophy in half the time and for half the price.
__________________
I highjacked a rainbow and crashed into a pot of gold - Bon Jovi
Darryl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-2010, 10:02 PM   #14
Dryer sheet wannabe
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 16
WOW! Thanks for all the feedback...pro & con. So much to consider!
__________________
want2er is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2010, 01:01 AM   #15
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 281
Quote:
There is no real benefit in holding bonds yourself. To think otherwise is to delude yourself.
Here is one article with a possible disadvantage to holding a TIPS fund instead of individual TIPS. (This issue would also apply to buying TIPS in the secondary market with inflation factors already applied. )


"The deflation promise. If you're worried that prices may fall and you want to take advantage of TIPS original principal guarantee, you should consider buying new TIPS directly from the Treasury at an upcoming auction. That's because the funds that hold TIPS purposefully hold a variety of maturities, including some TIPS that were issued five or even 10 years ago. Those earlier TIPS have already experienced a cumulative CPI-driven boost in their principal values—perhaps 25 percent more in some cases, observes John Hollyer, co-manager of Vanguard's TIPS fund. If deflation does become a problem, he says, investors in an existing basket of outstanding TIPS will lose a lot of principal before hitting their original principal guarantees. "

From - 5 Tips For Investing in TIPS: Treasury Inflation Protected Securities - The Best Life (usnews.com)
__________________
TooFrugal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2010, 03:10 AM   #16
Recycles dryer sheets
thefinancebuff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 262
Quote:
Originally Posted by LOL! View Post
My problem with TIPS is that the yields are at historical lows. See for example St. Louis Fed: Series: DFII10, 10-Year Treasury Inflation-Indexed Security, Constant Maturity Everyone wants them, so there is a bubble in TIPS going on right now. They also only help you with unexpected inflation. All bond funds price in expected inflation, so you get most of the inflation protection offered by TIPS in a regular bond fund.
Yields on regular bonds are also at a historical low. Everyone wants nominal Treasurys even more. You have to see if the expected inflation built into the nominal bond yield is enough. If it's too low, TIPS can still be a better deal than regular bonds.
__________________
thefinancebuff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2010, 06:05 AM   #17
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 360
I took a quick look at the 10 yr TIPS and saw yields of 2 - 3 1/2 %. Why make it so complicated? Why not just get the Penfed 7 yr at 3.75%.
__________________
jayc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2010, 08:41 AM   #18
Moderator
ziggy29's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 15,612
Quote:
Originally Posted by LOL! View Post
My problem with TIPS is that the yields are at historical lows. See for example St. Louis Fed: Series: DFII10, 10-Year Treasury Inflation-Indexed Security, Constant Maturity Everyone wants them, so there is a bubble in TIPS going on right now. They also only help you with unexpected inflation. All bond funds price in expected inflation, so you get most of the inflation protection offered by TIPS in a regular bond fund.
Maybe. But really I expect TIPS to be more pricey when inflation kicks in, and people want the inflation protection. TIPS have benefited somewhat from the "flight to safety" in that they are Treasuries, but in an era of little or no inflation more people are opting for the traditional Treasury product.

I happily bought quite of bit of laddered individual TIPS in November 2008 when they were priced to a nearly 3% real yield and sit comfortably with those until they mature. It's possible they can drop in price if a "Treasury bubble" pops, but I'm looking at return based on my purchase price, and I doubt they'd fall too much from that level.
__________________
"Hey, for every ten dollars, that's another hour that I have to be in the work place. That's an hour of my life. And my life is a very finite thing. I have only 'x' number of hours left before I'm dead. So how do I want to use these hours of my life? Do I want to use them just spending it on more crap and more stuff, or do I want to start getting a handle on it and using my life more intelligently?" -- Joe Dominguez (1938 - 1997)

RIP to Reemy, my avatar dog (2003 - 9/16/2017)
ziggy29 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2010, 10:44 AM   #19
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 8,616
Yep, I bought VIPSX when the blue line was up there at 2.5%. After interest rates dropped and the NAV went way up, I sold and realized the capital gains as I am a total return investor. The cap gains paid for a few years of future interest while I wait in other bond funds.
__________________
LOL! is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2010, 11:32 AM   #20
Full time employment: Posting here.
antmary's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Northern California
Posts: 542
Some great info on TIPS!

We hold 1/2 of our Roth funds in TIPS funds, and 1/2 in the Intermediate Treasury fund - both from Vanguard. I was told that bond funds go into tax-advantaged vehicles.

For the taxable part of the portfolio, we hold 60/40 Total Stock Market and FTSE ex-US, from Vanguard as well.

Plus we hold 5% in gold.

As we age, the portfolio will change re: asset allocation.

Whenever I consider adding funds, etc., I feel most comfortable when doing so within the context of the entire portfolio. All these oars in the water will hopefully keep our boat afloat!
__________________

__________________
antmary is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Good time/idea to start a TIPS ladder? beldar3 FIRE and Money 0 10-15-2008 05:38 PM
CD Ladder Opinions Please Puppy Belly FIRE and Money 78 01-23-2008 05:15 PM
Building a ladder nun FIRE and Money 16 05-15-2006 06:38 PM
CD Ladder vs. MM setab FIRE and Money 6 05-12-2006 12:10 PM
Starting a Roth Adventuregirl FIRE and Money 4 10-27-2005 12:28 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:22 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.