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Old 09-27-2007, 06:44 AM   #21
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If it works - why would he try to make money from selling the system instead of using it alone?
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Old 09-27-2007, 06:59 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by FinanceGeek View Post
Well...to be the devil's advocate...if writing covered calls is a guaranteed losing strategy...and options transactions are a zero sum game...then taking the opposite side of the trade (buy the option, short the equity)...must be a guaranteed winning game?

Its all not that simple folks. Writing covered calls CAN actually be a decent income generating strategy when done in a reasonable way (minimized trading costs, keeping taxes at bay by doing it in an IRA, etc.).

Yes, but the OP indicated a 25% return. It is not the derivative instrument that is the demon. It is the get rich quick lure and the @$$h0!3 that tries to sell these systems to naive people. Leading them to believe that there is some sure-fire short-cut to fast money.
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Old 09-27-2007, 08:40 AM   #23
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Why is the ticker for Investools "SWIM"? Is it because they are underwater? Drowning?
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Old 09-27-2007, 10:23 AM   #24
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I came across this somewhat related post on wikipedia and thought it would be of interest here ...

A forex scam is any trading scheme used to defraud individual traders by convincing them that they can expect to gain an unreasonably high profit by trading in the foreign exchange market, which would be a zero-sum game were it not for the fact that there are brokerage commissions, which technically make forex a "negative-sum" game.

These scams might include churning of customer accounts for the purpose of generating commissions, selling software that is supposed to guide the customer to large profits,[1] improperly managed "managed accounts",[2] false advertising,[3] Ponzi schemes and outright fraud.[4] It also refers to any retail forex broker who indicates that trading foreign exchange is a low risk, high profit investment.[5]

The CFTC lists 9 warning signs for foreign exchange trading fraud:[5]
1. Stay away from opportunities that seem too good to be true Always remember that there is no such thing as a "free lunch." Be especially cautious if you have acquired a large sum of cash recently and are looking for a safe investment vehicle. In particular, retirees with access to their retirement funds may be attractive targets for fraudulent operators. Getting your money back once it is gone can be difficult or impossible.

2. Avoid any company that predicts or guarantees large profits Be extremely wary of companies that guarantee profits, or that tout extremely high performance. In many cases, those claims are false. The following are examples of statements that either are or most likely are fraudulent: "Whether the market moves up or down, in the currency market you will make a profit." "Make $1000 per week, every week" "We are out-performing domestic investments." "The main advantage of the forex markets is that there is no bear market." "We guarantee you will make at least a 30-40% rate of return within two months."

3. Stay Away From Companies That Promise Little or No Financial Risk Be suspicious of companies that downplay risks or state that written risk disclosure statements are routine formalities imposed by the government. The currency futures and options markets are volatile and contain substantial risks for unsophisticated customers. The currency futures and options markets are not the place to put any funds that you cannot afford to lose. For example, retirement funds should not be used for currency trading. g. You can lose most or all of those funds very quickly trading foreign currency futures or options contracts. Therefore, beware of companies that make the following types of statements:
"With a $10,000 deposit, the maximum you can lose is $200 to $250 per day." "We promise to recover any losses you have." "Your investment is secure."

4. Don't Trade on Margin Unless You Understand What It Means Margin trading can make you responsible for losses that greatly exceed the dollar amount you deposited. Many currency traders ask customers to give them money, which they sometimes refer to as "margin," often sums in the range of $1,000 to $5,000. However, those amounts, which are relatively small in the currency markets, actually control far larger dollar amounts of trading, a fact that often is poorly explained to customers. Don't trade on margin unless you fully understand what you are doing and are prepared to accept losses that exceed the margin amounts you paid.

5. Question Firms That Claim To Trade in the "Interbank Market" Be wary of firms that claim that you can or should trade in the "interbank market," or that they will do so on your behalf. Unregulated, fraudulent currency trading firms often tell retail customers that their funds are traded in the "interbank market," where good prices can be obtained. Firms that trade currencies in the interbank market, however, are most likely to be banks, investment banks and large corporations, since the term "interbank market" refers simply to a loose network of currency transactions negotiated between financial institutions and other large companies.

6. Be Wary of Sending or Transferring Cash on the Internet, By Mail or Otherwise Be especially alert to the dangers of trading on-line; it is very easy to transfer funds on-line, but often can be impossible to get a refund. It costs an Internet advertiser just pennies per day to reach a potential audience of millions of persons, and phony currency trading firms have seized upon the Internet as an inexpensive and effective way of reaching a large pool of potential customers. Companies offering currency trading on-line will usually be located in different legal jurisdictions to you. Even if they display an address or any other information identifying their nationality on their Web site it may be false. Be aware that if you transfer funds to foreign firms it may be very difficult or impossible to recover your funds.

7. Currency Scams Often Target Members of Ethnic Minorities Some currency trading scams target potential customers in ethnic communities, particularly persons in the Russian, Chinese and Indian immigrant communities, through advertisements in ethnic newspapers and television "infomercials." Sometimes those advertisements offer so-called "job opportunities" for "account executives" to trade foreign currencies. Be aware that "account executives" that are hired might be expected to use their own money for currency trading, as well as to recruit their family and friends to do likewise. What appears to be a promising job opportunity often is another way many of these companies lure customers into parting with their cash.

8. Be Sure You Get the Company's Performance Track Record Get as much information as possible about the firm's or individual's performance record on behalf of other clients. You should be aware, however, that It may be difficult or impossible to do so, or to verify the information you receive. While firms and individuals are not required to provide this information, you should be wary of any person who is not willing to do so or who provides you with incomplete information. However, keep in mind, even if you do receive a glossy brochure or sophisticated-looking charts, that the information they contain might be false.

9. Don't Deal With Anyone Who Won't Give You His Background Plan to do a lot of checking of any information you receive to be sure that the company is and does exactly what it says. Get the background of the persons running or promoting the company, if possible. Do not rely solely on oral statements or promises from the firm's employees. Ask for all information in written form. If you cannot satisfy yourself that the persons with whom you are dealing are completely legitimate and above-board, the wisest course of action is to avoid trading foreign currencies through those companies.
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Old 09-27-2007, 10:26 AM   #25
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Yeah but you know there is no fraud with HOT NAKED BABES!!!!!
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Old 09-27-2007, 10:39 AM   #26
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There could be some fraudulent misrepresentation if some of the HNB's have been surgically enhanced.
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Old 09-27-2007, 10:50 AM   #27
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There could be some fraudulent misrepresentation if some of the HNB's have been surgically enhanced.
If you are only going to look, what's the difference?
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Old 09-27-2007, 11:03 AM   #28
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I vote "yes" to both questions.
Agreed!
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Old 09-27-2007, 11:05 AM   #29
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If it works - why would he try to make money from selling the system instead of using it alone?
Because they are giving back...money is not important to them
I'm sure the $999 is for shipping and handling....
TJ
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Old 09-27-2007, 11:17 AM   #30
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Well done, ERD!
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Old 09-28-2007, 05:10 AM   #31
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Yeah but you know there is no fraud with HOT NAKED BABES!!!!!

Is that what they mean by Naked Call? If so, its likely to get more action than a Covered Call!
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Old 09-28-2007, 04:41 PM   #32
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make 15-25% year in and year out with very little risk using covered calls.
I would love to take advantage of this 'sure thing', but unfortunately all of my money is tied up in a pyramid scheme that I just know will soon make me a billionaire.
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