Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 03-05-2018, 02:54 PM   #21
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
calmloki's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Independence
Posts: 5,653
Most of our income is from rental property - but I find conflicting thoughts on whether the rental income will get the 20% tax exclusion for pass through income. We do NOT hold the rentals as LLCs. Our tax person indicates that the IRS hasn't really given guidance on whether non-LLC or S corp rental income will get the favorable treatment.
__________________

calmloki is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 03-05-2018, 03:59 PM   #22
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by audreyh1 View Post
Thanks for that. I have my own spreadsheets, but like to use TurboTax for what-if if I can, and I was wondering if they had updated to 2018.
The spreadsheet at https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/fo...sheet-updates/ has both 2018 tax and withholding calculations. Matches our situation well.
__________________

SevenUp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2018, 01:43 PM   #23
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Treasure Coast
Posts: 394
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathy63 View Post
If any desktop TurboTax users want a more exact calculator than the NYT one, I noticed that TTax has updated their What-If form for 2018.

As I expected, we are in the 25% of taxpayers that will be paying more. With the exact same inputs, $668 in 2017 vs $5403 in 2018 means a whopping 685% increase for us.

To get to the What-If tool in TurboTax:
- press Ctrl+2 (Cmd+2 on a Mac) or choose Forms from the View menu
- click the Open Form icon then start typing "what-if" in the search box and select What-if Worksheet when it appears
- check the box at the top of the what-if form to copy column 1 to column 2
- check the box in column 2 to use 2018 tax rates
Thank you. This was very helpful. Even though I'm a long-term user of TurboTax, I didn't know about this feature. Previously, I would create a what-if return from the current return and this was good enough since not many things changed. However, with the new tax law changes and some large swings in various types of income on my return, my 2018 picture will be quite different. None of the online calculators come close to being able to work with the complexities in my return.
45th Birthday is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2018, 02:20 PM   #24
Full time employment: Posting here.
Philliefan33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 838
Quote:
Originally Posted by SumDay View Post
I'm not trusting the IRS calculator. It says I should be claiming Married & 14 allowances on my W4. I'm currently claiming Single, 0 allowances and an extra $50 a check, which by my calculations should get us a ~$350 refund.


I use H&R Block and their 2018 planning calculator won't be ready until March 23. I predict there will be lots of wailing and gnashing of teeth next year at this time.


I agree. DH and I volunteer with AARP, doing tax returns for seniors and lower-income families. Itís remarkable how many people donít understand the difference between tax liability and withholding.
Philliefan33 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2018, 03:25 PM   #25
Recycles dryer sheets
winger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 252
Interesting to see this today, I worked on our 2017 taxes last night and wanted to get an idea what 2018 was going to look like.

We are both on SS, and also take withdrawals from our IRAs. We will continue to pay income tax on 50% of our SS benefits, but I wanted to see what raising our IRA withdrawal would do to taxes due.

Found this calculator.
https://financialducksinarow.com/115...ocial-security
winger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2018, 08:12 AM   #26
Administrator
Alan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Traveling
Posts: 22,238
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathy63 View Post
If any desktop TurboTax users want a more exact calculator than the NYT one, I noticed that TTax has updated their What-If form for 2018.

As I expected, we are in the 25% of taxpayers that will be paying more. With the exact same inputs, $668 in 2017 vs $5403 in 2018 means a whopping 685% increase for us.

To get to the What-If tool in TurboTax:
- press Ctrl+2 (Cmd+2 on a Mac) or choose Forms from the View menu
- click the Open Form icon then start typing "what-if" in the search box and select What-if Worksheet when it appears
- check the box at the top of the what-if form to copy column 1 to column 2
- check the box in column 2 to use 2018 tax rates
Thanks for this, never tried the TT what-if tool before . For us it shows a big drop in taxes for the same income in 2018. Pensions + QDIV's + Roth conversion+ $40k Cap gains + $29k interest.

In 2017 we cashed out the last of our I-Bonds and sold a bunch of equities to buy a house. 2018 will have a lot less interest and cap gains so I may well decide to accelerate my Roth conversions.
__________________
Retired in Jan, 2010 at 55, moved to England in May 2016
Now it's adventure before dementia
Alan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2018, 08:56 AM   #27
Full time employment: Posting here.
USGrant1962's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: DC area
Posts: 503
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathy63 View Post
As I expected, we are in the 25% of taxpayers that will be paying more.
I don't know where you got the idea that 25% will see tax increases. Virtually every analysis I've seen says ~5% will see tax increases - even the left-leaning Tax Policy Center says 5%.

Distributional Analysis of the Conference Agreement for the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act | Full Report | Tax Policy Center
__________________
Semi-ER March 24, 2017
USGrant1962
USGrant1962 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2018, 11:54 AM   #28
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Coronado
Posts: 687
Quote:
Originally Posted by USGrant1962 View Post
I don't know where you got the idea that 25% will see tax increases. Virtually every analysis I've seen says ~5% will see tax increases - even the left-leaning Tax Policy Center says 5%.

Distributional Analysis of the Conference Agreement for the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act | Full Report | Tax Policy Center
First sentence of the NYT article linked in the original post is "The Republican tax bill would cut taxes for about 75 percent of filers in 2018."

Doesn't really matter if we're in the bottom 25% or the bottom 5% though. I can make a few changes and get the amount we'll owe down a little bit, but there's absolutely no way to get it anywhere close to being a tax cut for us.
cathy63 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2018, 12:06 PM   #29
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
RunningBum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 5,924
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathy63 View Post
First sentence of the NYT article linked in the original post is "The Republican tax bill would cut taxes for about 75 percent of filers in 2018."
Couldn't there be 20% that see no change, leaving 5% to see an increase?
RunningBum is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2018, 12:23 PM   #30
Recycles dryer sheets
beowulf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 491
No change means no increase or decrease in taxes, no matter how small. If you define it a little more loosely, letís say $100 in either direction, I think the 25% number for no change would work well. Just a guess, but it makes sense. Unless I missed something, the NYT calculator has only broad brush estimates. It doesnít allow for the input of any details. It shows a roughly $2K cut for us. I know that isnít possible as several significant deductions we take have either disappeared or been reduced. Not sure we will be able to itemize for 2018 and have no idea where that will leave us. When we finish with our 2017 return, Iíll try the TT what if calculator. That might give us a better idea of where weíll be at tax time in 2019.
__________________
Mission accomplished - not necessarily ER, but certainly R.
beowulf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2018, 12:42 PM   #31
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 622
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathy63 View Post
It's going to be interesting to see how this all plays out next spring. A lot of people who don't pay attention to withholding are going to be shocked and feel like they're paying more even though they might actually be paying less.
I'm also curious to see how many people are affected this way. I can only speak for myself; my withholding went down significantly more than my taxes will.

If my case is typical, I can foresee a lot of anger. I guess the idea is it'll hit half way between the mid-term and presidential elections, so the political fallout is minimized. But it seems unnecessary to mislead taxpayers.

I'm glad I checked my numbers, but still feel bad for those who are in for an unhappy surprise at tax time.
CaptTom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2018, 04:34 PM   #32
Full time employment: Posting here.
Just_Steve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Dutchess County
Posts: 944
Had to pay feds $1500 this year but doing the what-if shows a $2000 decrees so looks like a good deal to me.

Thank you @cathy63, didn't know how to do this.
Just_Steve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2018, 04:38 PM   #33
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Kerrville,Tx
Posts: 3,075
One interesting tidbit that could help if folks would say if they are in a high state/local tax state or a low one. The 10k limit could make a big difference there. Also if they are loosing exemptions because they have dependent over 17. (The new tax credit is worth the equivalent of a 5700 exemption for someone in the 35 percent bracket and more if in lower brackets)

One of these things has to be happening to folks if they have a constant income, as if you look at taxable income (i.e. after deductions etc) the average rate has typically gone down 13% for folks in the middle income ranges. (Below 35% bracket)
meierlde is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2018, 04:49 PM   #34
Recycles dryer sheets
beowulf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 491
Those in high state and local tax states, like NY and NYC, will really be hurt. Those who live on LI are further hurt by the high property taxes. A family living on LI in a $600K house would pay about $14K in RE taxes (depending on what jurisdiction they live in) at least $10K in NYS taxes and one heck of a lot in sales taxes. I have no idea how folks in CA, MA, etc., are going to cope with the tax increases. I’m pretty sure I read that CA and NY are going to try some end runs that will somehow make taxes charitable contributions or something like that, but I can’t imagine how that would work.
__________________
Mission accomplished - not necessarily ER, but certainly R.
beowulf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2018, 04:53 PM   #35
Administrator
Alan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Traveling
Posts: 22,238
For myself no State taxes, standard deduction taken in 2017
__________________
Retired in Jan, 2010 at 55, moved to England in May 2016
Now it's adventure before dementia
Alan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2018, 06:17 PM   #36
Dryer sheet wannabe
Morgan22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 20
I'm in MA. We normally itemize. (Itemized deductions and personal exemptions added up to about $26k each year.) For 2018 we will take the $24k standard deduction. Everything else being the same we will owe $3k less in Federal taxes. The reduction of the tax brackets make a big difference.
Morgan22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2018, 06:25 PM   #37
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Laurel, MD
Posts: 3,387
Quote:
Originally Posted by USGrant1962 View Post
I don't know where you got the idea that 25% will see tax increases. Virtually every analysis I've seen says ~5% will see tax increases - even the left-leaning Tax Policy Center says 5%.



Distributional Analysis of the Conference Agreement for the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act | Full Report | Tax Policy Center


I live in a high tax state and will pay more. Hard to believe I'm in such a select group (5%). The underwithholding will make things worse. Anecdotally I've heard several local tax planners anticipating shock and awe next tax season. The impact in 2027 cited in the report above was a shock to me:
Compared to current law, 5 percent of taxpayers would pay more tax in 2018, 9 percent in 2025, and 53 percent in 2027.
__________________
...with no reasonable expectation for ER, I'm just here auditing the AP class.Retired 8/1/15.
jazz4cash is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2018, 08:39 PM   #38
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
pb4uski's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Vermont & Sarasota, FL
Posts: 18,178
SALT limit will impact us by about $2,600.... but it is really a moot point because even with no SALT limit the new standard deduction exceeds our itemized deductions so SALT will really have no impact on us.... the main impact to us is that the $24k new standard deduction is less than our 2017 itemized deductions and exemptions by $3,400.
__________________
If something cannot endure laughter.... it cannot endure.
Patience is the art of concealing your impatience.
Slow and steady wins the race.

Retired Jan 2012 at age 56...60/35/5 AA
pb4uski is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2018, 01:39 PM   #39
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Bay Area
Posts: 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathy63 View Post
If any desktop TurboTax users want a more exact calculator than the NYT one, I noticed that TTax has updated their What-If form for 2018.

As I expected, we are in the 25% of taxpayers that will be paying more. With the exact same inputs, $668 in 2017 vs $5403 in 2018 means a whopping 685% increase for us.

To get to the What-If tool in TurboTax:
- press Ctrl+2 (Cmd+2 on a Mac) or choose Forms from the View menu
- click the Open Form icon then start typing "what-if" in the search box and select What-if Worksheet when it appears
- check the box at the top of the what-if form to copy column 1 to column 2
- check the box in column 2 to use 2018 tax rates
Thank you for posting this Cathy63. I was working on my 2017 taxes in TT and the TT what-if tool was helpful in not only reviewing the likely effect of the new tax bill, but for determining my planned 2018 Federal estimated tax payments.

I did have to play with the inputs a bit before getting a satisfactory and reasonable outcome. One of the findings of my review is that I may end up taking the standard deduction for Federal Taxes, and itemizing deductions for State Taxes. The what-if tool (for Federal)/est tax options (for State) est taxes show this combination is likely to produce the best 2018 outcome for me (the smallest increase in overall income taxes).

BTW, my preliminary online research suggests that using a different deductions approach for State Taxes is legal here in California; however, it appears that in some states, if you take the standard deduction on your Federal return, you must take the standard deduction on the State return; and similar for itemizing. Worth a look, especially if you're an itemizer who will be losing deductions no longer allowed for Federal returns under the new law.

NL
Nature Lover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2018, 11:54 AM   #40
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Laurel, MD
Posts: 3,387
My state just announced they expect a large increase in collections next year as unintended side effect from federal changes. Not sure if it's just due to requiring consistency in using std vs itemized or change to SALT deduction. I was expecting this. The state claims they will find a way to offset the increase.
__________________

__________________
...with no reasonable expectation for ER, I'm just here auditing the AP class.Retired 8/1/15.
jazz4cash is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Will property tax still be deductible after the expected tax reform/cut? Disappointed FIRE and Money 12 09-09-2017 07:03 AM
After tax savings or pre-tax savings jIMOh Young Dreamers 13 08-08-2014 10:27 PM
To Cut The Deficit We Must Cut Large Categories haha FIRE and Money 21 01-09-2011 07:10 AM
Poll: Have you ever seen a more worthless online retirement savings calculator? SLC Tortfeasor Young Dreamers 16 04-29-2007 10:31 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:46 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.