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Old 10-07-2008, 02:55 PM   #21
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Soooo - I should send those Vanguard computers rebalancing into stocks as they swoon - candy and flowers a few years from now cause they bought on the dip?

I'm glad I largely gave up my asset class selection/rebalancing - aka slice and dice (yes I'm a steely eyed/rational investor - not). We did have some good looking ladies at the New Orleans AAII chapter meetings though.

Martin Gramatica kicking wide last night was enough. I'll let the VG Target Retirement computers do the heavy rebalancing.

Meanwhile - down in the league cellar with the Saint's I may pick a few more good dividend stocks to maintain my Norwegian widow status.

I'm hoping we don't do a 1966 - 1982 type long time to sort out kinda of thing.

Dividends are ok but sheeesh!

heh heh heh - Pssst Wellesley. Rock up, party on .
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Old 10-07-2008, 03:07 PM   #22
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This is small comfort to those of us like myself who started working and investing in the last 10 years. We continued to buy into a rising market through automatic contributions, and are now seeing any gains wiped out plus substantial losses on our original investment. Even with a decent bond allocation, total return is way negative, plus the destruction in purchasing power due to inflation only compounds the problem (i.e. stocks decline 15%, minus an additional 3-5%/year from inflation). It's pretty gloomy.

Someone who has held a consistent portfolio for +10 years is probably doing ok in the grand scheme of things. But I don't think that's the reality for most investors.
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Old 10-07-2008, 03:10 PM   #23
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DOW down another 500+ points today. 8,000 just around the corner at the rate were going. That's a number I've seen predicted here and other sites. I just hope it stops there.
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Old 10-07-2008, 03:12 PM   #24
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This is small comfort to those of us like myself who started working and investing in the last 10 years. We continued to buy into a rising market through automatic contributions, and are now seeing any gains wiped out plus substantial losses on our original investment. Even with a decent bond allocation, total return is substantially negative, plus the destruction in purchasing power due to inflation only compounds the problem (i.e. stocks decline 15%, minus an additional 3-5%/year from inflation). It's pretty gloomy.
Well, if we're fortunate, inflation WILL be a problem. Because if we hit a deflationary cycle, our portfolios are *really* toast.
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Old 10-07-2008, 03:19 PM   #25
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This is small comfort to those of us like myself who started working and investing in the last 10 years. We continued to buy into a rising market through automatic contributions, and are now seeing any gains wiped out plus substantial losses on our original investment. Even with a decent bond allocation, total return is substantially negative, plus the destruction in purchasing power due to inflation only compounds the problem (i.e. stocks decline 15%, minus an additional 3-5%/year from inflation). It's pretty gloomy.

Someone who has held a consistent portfolio for +10 years is probably doing ok in the grand scheme of things. But I don't think that's the reality for most investors.
Hey, I'm definitely feeling the hurt, too! I finished college in late 2003 and have been working and investing since then. I'm not sure if I'm in the negative since I started investing, but I wouldn't be too surprised. But the way I look at it, I'm 4-5 years into my accumulation phase and I have established a fairly decent sized portfolio in spite of the downturn. In the last four to five years, I have been focusing on paying down debts (student loans, credit cards, and the mortgage). My house went up in value a decent amount. When I did my quarterly portfolio review on 9/30/2008, I was still wealthier then than I was one year earlier on 9/30/2007. After the first seven days of October, I'm not sure if I remain wealthier than I was a year ago or not though.

But you can't really focus on the day to day fluctuations in market price of your long term investments or it will drive you crazy. I know I'm investing with a multi-decade horizon, so even though the last 3 months have been ugly, it is (hopefully) not "different this time" and this will look like a blip on a ten or twenty year chart. Today I'm buying mutual funds at prices not seen since before I started really investing back in 2003-2004.
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Old 10-07-2008, 03:24 PM   #26
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Hey, I'm definitely feeling the hurt, too! I finished college in late 2003 and have been working and investing since then. I'm not sure if I'm in the negative since I started investing, but I wouldn't be too surprised. But the way I look at it, I'm 4-5 years into my accumulation phase and I have established a fairly decent sized portfolio in spite of the downturn. In the last four to five years, I have been focusing on paying down debts (student loans, credit cards, and the mortgage). My house went up in value a decent amount. When I did my quarterly portfolio review on 9/30/2008, I was still wealthier then than I was one year earlier on 9/30/2007. After the first seven days of October, I'm not sure if I remain wealthier than I was a year ago or not though.

But you can't really focus on the day to day fluctuations in market price of your long term investments or it will drive you crazy. I know I'm investing with a multi-decade horizon, so even though the last 3 months have been ugly, it is (hopefully) not "different this time" and this will look like a blip on a ten or twenty year chart. Today I'm buying mutual funds at prices not seen since before I started really investing back in 2003-2004.
When I was young, it didn't bother me when markets went down. You should be happy to be investing at corrected rates. As a recent retiree, I'm numb. Not really pissed anymore, just numb. Hopefully one day we will all get it back.
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Old 10-07-2008, 03:31 PM   #27
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When I was young, it didn't bother me when markets went down. You should be happy to be investing at corrected rates. As a recent retiree, I'm numb. Not really pissed anymore, just numb. Hopefully one day we will all get it back.
Hey, I'm happy to be getting in cheap. Undoubtedly the best thing that can happen for me long term would be to have the market go sideways to down for the next 5-10 years as I'm investing, and then start another 10-15 year bull market. As long as I can remain gainfully employed...

I have invested enough (in a 100% equities portfolio) that my losses last quarter exceeded DW's annual salary, and I'm pretty sure our YTD losses have exceeded my salary now. I was down 20.7% as of 9/30/2008, and it looks like "the market" is down another 13-14% since then, so I'm probably looking at having lost around a third of my portfolio's value this year. Come to think of it, I may have just lost the equivalent of my salary and my wife's salary YTD. Shhh... nobody tell DW!
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Old 10-07-2008, 03:32 PM   #28
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And recently, the 2000-2002 bear market was ugly, but then look at what followed in the five year period of 2003 through 2007 (again for the S&P 500):

2000: -9.06%
2001: -12.02%
2002: -22.15%

then,

2003: +28.5%
2004: +10.74%
2005: +4.77%
2006: +15.64%
2007: +5.39%

Maybe 2008 is going to be a really bad year. 2009 might also. Maybe 2010. Or 2009 and 2010 might be more like 1975-1976 and 2003-2004. No one knows which scenario will play out though.
So if one put $X in the SM in 1990 (buy and hold) the average return for those 8 years was close to 2.5% compounded before inflation? SM investing is too difficult (for me) you would have to "work" to make a significant return above a decent CD ladder (I got an annual average 5.7% compounded APY return before inflation on FDIC CD's for that period; lots less "work"). I do not mean to gloat and this current "downturn" is devastating for too many people.
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Old 10-07-2008, 03:33 PM   #29
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When I was young, it didn't bother me when markets went down. You should be happy to be investing at corrected rates. As a recent retiree, I'm numb. Not really pissed anymore, just numb. Hopefully one day we will all get it back.
This echos my feeling exactly Dawg54. I'm concerned this downturn is different than others in the past and being older makes it harder to take. In this case, the entire global economy is more connected and is looking simply gloomy. I've been concerned because DH and I have a fair amount of our NW in real estate - our home plus a rental. Even with the real estate market tanking, I take comfort in knowing there is value in land and property that will eventually come back. I hope so anyway
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Old 10-07-2008, 03:35 PM   #30
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When I was young, it didn't bother me when markets went down. You should be happy to be investing at corrected rates. As a recent retiree, I'm numb. Not really pissed anymore, just numb. Hopefully one day we will all get it back.

I'm so numb happy hour is not happy any more !
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Old 10-07-2008, 03:41 PM   #31
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So if one put $X in the SM in 1990 (buy and hold) the average return for those 8 years was close to 2.5% compounded before inflation? SM investing is too difficult (for me) you would have to "work" to make a significant return above a decent CD ladder (I got an annual average 5.7% compounded APY return before inflation on FDIC CD's for that period; lots less "work"). I do not mean to gloat and this current "downturn" is devastating for too many people.
Since 1990, you would have an annual return of around 6.4% per year based on the results of the S&P 500 over the last 18 years. Plus dividends, which may be close to inflation over that period.

If you meant investing in the year 2000 and holding for 8 years, then yes, your results would not have been this good - I calculated 1.5% avg annual returns. In other words, you would have lost a slight bit (~1%) per year to inflation. My point in posting 2000 to 2007 returns was to indicate that if we are currently seeing the bottom (ie if this is 2002 or 1974), then we may be in line for some steep returns going forward. If you had investing at the end of 2002, you would be sitting on 13% per year avg annual returns through the end of 2007.
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Old 10-07-2008, 03:49 PM   #32
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FUEGO: I see your point; and even tho I do not anticipate ever putting a $ in the SM, I sincerely hope there is a good up turn in it, and the sooner the better.
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Old 10-07-2008, 03:50 PM   #33
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So if one put $X in the SM in 1990 (buy and hold) the average return for those 8 years was close to 2.5% compounded before inflation? SM investing is too difficult (for me) you would have to "work" to make a significant return above a decent CD ladder (I got an annual average 5.7% compounded APY return before inflation on FDIC CD's for that period; lots less "work"). I do not mean to gloat and this current "downturn" is devastating for too many people.
You have no idea how I wish I had followed your strategy. Glad I did on half my portfolio. Oh well, buy more Bud and hunker down. Maybe that's what Unclemick means when he says "party on".
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Old 10-07-2008, 03:52 PM   #34
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DOW down another 500+ points today. 8,000 just around the corner at the rate were going. That's a number I've seen predicted here and other sites. I just hope it stops there.
Take a look at the last time the S&p went to 800 - it took about 2.5 years to get there.

It took about 4.7 years to get back to 1,550 - the top

It look like it might take 1 year to get to 800.

I would guess it will take less than 5.5 years to get back to the 1,550. Markets that go down quickly usually rebound quickly.

If the 800 level holds it will be a strong double bottom.

PS - the charts for 1929 do not match the charts since the 2000 high.
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Old 10-07-2008, 04:00 PM   #35
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[Darn it! Somehow most of my post got clobbered!]

I actually sold some bonds to bring some of my stock mutual funds into balance today. I hope I'm not jinxing things by posting here - knock on wood!!! We're at levels not only seen in Q2 of 2003, but also seen in Q3 of 1997!!!

That just seems incredible to me and it seems like a gift. There sure seem to be a lot of technical factors pushing the markets down - hedge funds bailing, people positioning themselves for a lifting of the short ban, etc. The VIX levels have been just incredible.

Sure we still might see DOW 8000 or 7500 and/or S&P 800 again. That's probably all the rebalancing bullets I'll have left though if we get there. At some point I've gotta protect my remaining bond/cash allocation.

History tells us that it takes about 60 days from a credit/financial crisis for the freak-out/panic to settle down. So by Dec 1 some of the smoke should clear.

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Old 10-07-2008, 04:02 PM   #36
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(And you guys laughed when I said the Royal Bank of Scotland said we'd be down to 1050 by September, so they were a tad off and it's early October but we are at 1056 in the S&P right now.)
If RBS was so prescient, they wouldn't be in danger of failing tomorrow.
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Old 10-07-2008, 04:04 PM   #37
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Someone please change the title of this thread. It lies.
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"Hey, for every ten dollars, that's another hour that I have to be in the work place. That's an hour of my life. And my life is a very finite thing. I have only 'x' number of hours left before I'm dead. So how do I want to use these hours of my life? Do I want to use them just spending it on more crap and more stuff, or do I want to start getting a handle on it and using my life more intelligently?" -- Joe Dominguez (1938 - 1997)

RIP to Reemy, my avatar dog (2003 - 9/16/2017)
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Old 10-07-2008, 04:06 PM   #38
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Is that better?
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Old 10-07-2008, 04:13 PM   #39
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FT.com / Columnists / Tony Jackson - New panic is proof of big league crisis

"Monday’s fresh outburst of panic on global markets was final proof that as financial crises go, we are now in the big league. Comparisons with the dotcom bubble or even the Asian crisis of 1997 are inadequate. We must think of 1987 or 1929."


Aieeeee!
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Old 10-07-2008, 04:19 PM   #40
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FT.com / Columnists / Tony Jackson - New panic is proof of big league crisis

"Monday’s fresh outburst of panic on global markets was final proof that as financial crises go, we are now in the big league. Comparisons with the dotcom bubble or even the Asian crisis of 1997 are inadequate. We must think of 1987 or 1929."
1987? Pfft. Many people forget that the market was UP in 1987 for the entire year. We focus on a really bad month or two, forgetting that the other 10 months were strongly higher.

I suspect 2008 is not going to finish as an "up" year. Call me crazy...
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