Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 06-29-2007, 09:19 PM   #21
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 4,898
An interesting situation, not unlike my own (late life divorce situation), although I'm not that old and am not relying on alimony (I have a trust). But I am looking toward the future and saving part of my income. Still, I used to live "for the day." So I understand your MIL's mindset been there. But, unlike myself, she has not experienced a real wake up call financially as yet.

The idea of a term life insurance policy on the ex-husband is a common solution to the possible scenario of his death and her loss of alimony. This would seem to be a good solution.

Also, if I might suggest, take her to see "Sicko" the new Michael Moore documentary. If that doesn't scare her, nothing will.
__________________

__________________
Zoocat is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 06-30-2007, 03:01 AM   #22
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 5,072
My advice: Once you are satisfied that she understands the implications... let it go. Even though I would want to give her a stern warning about what it means to her... I would not do so. That said. If she is scraping by on SS in a few years, that is her decision.

Fortunately, my parents and in-laws both were both LBYM philosophically oriented. So there was never this type of issue (or worry) with them.

Your MIL sounds more like my BIL. He and his DW are spendthrifts. We love them dearly, but they are almost the polar opposite of his sister (my DW) and I. They spend like crazy and cite "Carpe Deim" as the rationale. They inherited about $300 k about 10 years ago and spent it on vacations, eating out, repeated new cars, massive amounts of "Stuff". That is over and above a combined salary of approx $100k/y. I was a bit taken back by their decisions. Of course, they are now about 55 and are typical of what you read about in boomers. 2nd mortgage on the house and probably a total of $100k in 401k. No pensions. Their retirement plan is SS. As an aside, inheritance could bail them out. Both of their parents are elderly and were LBYM people (so they have nest eggs).

If they do not inherit anything, their lifestyle will drop in a huge way. They may have to work till they drop. Since BIL DW has health problems, she is likely to not be able to work till 65. If the inheritance does work out... they are so caught up in the spendthrift lifestyle, I would expect them to blow their inheritance fairly quickly. They are an example of people who should probably purchase a SPIA just to exert some budget discipline into their lives and not run out of money.
__________________

__________________
chinaco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-2007, 11:42 AM   #23
Recycles dryer sheets
Scrapr's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Bend
Posts: 267
"somehow things will work out, they always do..."


code words for

SIL will provide for me

(LOL, i think)
__________________
Scrapr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-2007, 01:55 PM   #24
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Outtahere's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 1,677
Be sure to make it clear there is no room for her in YOUR budget.
__________________

Dogs aren't our whole lives, but they make our lives whole. - Roger Caras
Outtahere is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-2007, 03:18 PM   #25
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Keim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Moscow
Posts: 1,128
As my father in law says "You can't enlighten the unconscious."
__________________
Keim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-2007, 06:35 PM   #26
Moderator
bssc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 9,927
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keim View Post
As my father in law says "You can't enlighten the unconscious."
That reminds me of the joke:

Q: How many mother-in-laws does it take to change a light bulb?
A: None. They'll just sit in the dark and suffer.
__________________
bssc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-2007, 11:19 PM   #27
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Milton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 2,074
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meadbh View Post
Before giving up on her, I think it's worth writing her a letter that outlines the best and worst case scenarios and the choices that are hers to make. It might be helpful to have a document that she can reflect on later, perhaps when things are going the way you predicted, and when she is more ready to hear or see your POV. The tone of the letter should not be threatening but should make it clear that the outcome is her responsibility and that baling her out is not part of the FIREdreamer financial plan, because it doesn't need to be. If she doesn't believe you, she can get an independent review.
I don't see any upside to this approach. You've already made your point of view known, so there's no need to confirm everything in writing ... it's not like this situation is eventually going to wind up in court. And you don't need to justify your anticipated future refusal to provide financial assistance: that may well just get her back up ("I never asked you for anything, why would you even think that?").
__________________
"To know what you prefer, instead of humbly saying Amen to what the world tells you you ought to prefer, is to have kept your soul alive". Robert Louis Stevenson, An Inland Voyage (1878)
Milton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2007, 12:36 AM   #28
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 377
It never ceases to blow my mind, that people do not get the "be wise now" so you can "screw off the rest of your life"
__________________
Bigritchie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2007, 03:06 AM   #29
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
ladelfina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 2,713
Quote:
But I think there may be another problem underneath. She feels like the divorce was no fault of hers and that for her to have to cut her expenses to the bone is unfair.
IMO this is the worst aspect of it by far. She feels she is already being made to suffer the loss of her partner, so why should she also have to suffer in other ways on top of that?? She needs psychological compensation. I would encourage her to get out and meet people (in low-cost social activities or volunteer groups)-- in a few years she may feel independent enough on other levels to not need the spending 'crutch' to define her life and assuage the pain. Who knows? She might even meet another companion and 2 can live more cheaply than 1... as they say.
__________________
ladelfina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2007, 03:27 AM   #30
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 5,072
Quote:
Originally Posted by ladelfina View Post
IMO this is the worst aspect of it by far. She feels she is already being made to suffer the loss of her partner, so why should she also have to suffer in other ways on top of that?? She needs psychological compensation. ...

Plus, if she has a lifelong habit of being a spendthrift, you have a low chance of convincing her to change. This probaby an ingrained pattern of behavior. Her past experience tells her that things will work out. She probably will not change until she is forced to do so (kinda like someone with a drinking problem or drugs... has to hit rock bottom and be forced to consider the impact).

In other words... you are unlikely to prevail by trying to reason or educate her. But, you will ruin your relationship with her since she will feel you are meddling in her affairs. I would let it go once you are convinced that she actually understood your financial pointers.
__________________
chinaco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2007, 09:43 AM   #31
Moderator
bssc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 9,927
And if she meets another rich guy who is willing to support her spending habit, it will just reinforce that you were wrong. Life does take care of some people, unfortunately, I am not one of them.
__________________
bssc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2007, 10:59 AM   #32
Moderator Emeritus
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 11,038
I have made it perfectly clear how her current spending spree will affect her future income (I used graphs and numbers that a 10 year old could understand). I showed her how her income will drop dramatically in 10 years if she keeps spending like she does now. I feel like I warned her enough as it is. To me it's clear she is in denial. But I have come to realize that if she does not care about her own future, why should I?

As her odds of finding a rich guy? very low. Do you know how many single women there are for every single man in that age group? Wherever she goes to meet people there is almost always a 10:1 ratio of women to men...
__________________
FIREd is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2007, 12:14 PM   #33
Moderator
bssc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 9,927
Quote:
Originally Posted by FIREdreamer View Post
As her odds of finding a rich guy? very low. Do you know how many single women there are for every single man in that age group? Wherever she goes to meet people there is almost always a 10:1 ratio of women to men...
But people I know like that don't pay any attention to the odds. After all, they seem themselves entitled to be that one women who marries the rich man, not the other nine who don't.
__________________
bssc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2007, 07:03 PM   #34
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
clifp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 7,450
Ben Franklin was thinking of your MIL when he came up with this pearl
Quote:
Experience keeps a dear school, but fools will learn in no other.



Best of luck FIREdreamer we feel for you dude.
__________________
clifp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2007, 07:33 PM   #35
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
2B's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Houston
Posts: 4,330
She has a problem. You don't unless you decide to work the rest of your life to support her spending. She won't change and you can just give up to avoid further anguish.

In 10 years or sooner, she gets to live on her SS plus whatever she pulls out of her IRA. Based on her history, she'll drain it in about 3 or 4 years. Then she gets to find out who her friends really are. Since she can't run in the same circle anymore, I suspect she'll have a lot fewer friends.

The only real financial issue I see for you is how your wife will cope with Mom needing assisted living since she won't be able to afford it. If she's happy to see her live in a terrible situation until Medicade nursing care can take over, you'll do ok. Hopefully, she has a sibling that wants to take over Mom's care more than she does.
__________________
2B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2007, 09:34 PM   #36
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Brat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 5,914
Maybe they should take out a LTC policy for her. If/when she needs care at least they won't feel obligated to contribute.
__________________
Duck bjorn.
Brat is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2007, 09:44 PM   #37
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
cute fuzzy bunny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Losing my whump
Posts: 22,697
I've spent a couple of days now trying to figure out a good solution or a better way to put this, but...it aint coming to me. Probably because i've got a dose of it myself. My in-laws not only spend everything they get, they're up to their eyeballs in debt. FIL is on social security and partially disabled, MIL works but she wont be able to keep up with the rigors of the job for long. BIL also spends and is in debt. SIL has nothing set aside.

All have plenty of toys and are "spending it while they're young".

Realistically, you have no chance of changing the mindset.

Equally realistically, you might as well decide whether you feel like writing checks or which room she'll be staying in. At the end of the day, family is family and if the MIL runs out of cash, you'll be taking care of the results.

Its a tough nut to see how things oughta go and see people take real responsibility for their lives and their actions. Its how we all ended up retiring early or planning for it. Unfortunately that aint how most people think.

Maybe you'll be lucky and something will "work out"...
__________________
Be fearful when others are greedy, and greedy when others are fearful. Just another form of "buy low, sell high" for those who have trouble with things. This rule is not universal. Do not buy a 1973 Pinto because everyone else is afraid of it.
cute fuzzy bunny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2007, 10:00 PM   #38
Moderator
bssc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 9,927
Well, at least you don't have the same name. Several years ago, one of the people who I sat next to in cube land had a spend thrift father. They had the same name except he was a Jr. I could hear him alternately trying to explain this to collectors and credit bureaus that he was not his father and getting mad at his father for not getting his (the father's) act together since was impacting his score.
__________________
bssc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2007, 12:39 AM   #39
Moderator Emeritus
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 11,038
MIL already has a LTC policy. And next year she will qualify for Medicare which should lower her health insurance premiums and therefore give her a couple hundred dollars extra each month.
To be clear, I am a strong believer that family members should help each others when in need (I would without hesitation ask my mom/dad to move in with us if that's what she/he needed). But I also believe in personal responsibility. So I would be a lot less inclined to financially help someone who has consistently and knowingly made the wrong financial decisions and who then laid their problems at my door when they couldn't deal with them anymore. For years, I used to regularly bail my sister out financially but it's only when I stopped that she turned her situation around. I personally think that in this case tough love actually worked.
In my MIL's case though, I won't be the one deciding whether to help her or not, my wife will. And my wife does not believe that it is her duty to financially support her mom (and let's not even talk about my MIL moving with us, it would NEVER happen). Actually when my wife's grandfather died, her grandmother who was still in her fifties with no job, no skills and meager savings, had to take care of herself financially (she lived solely off of a very small income consisting of the dividends from her portfolio and SS). Her two daughers, my MIL and her sister who were earning very very good incomes at the time never proposed to help her financially. So if my MIL did not believe in helping her own mother, how could she make the case that we need to help her?
__________________
FIREd is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2007, 01:50 AM   #40
Full time employment: Posting here.
old woman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 551
I would back of entirely, no reason she can't write her own checks and balance her own checkbook. As long as you do things you are responsible in some way, if she takes it over she may feel the spending more.
She is only 64 not old yet she can learn to take care of herself. Mom is doing it at 80, she can spend all she likes then if she is out of money she can reverse mortgage her house or move to some place cheaper.
__________________

__________________
old woman is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Fed employee life insurance ats5g FIRE and Money 2 10-10-2006 11:44 PM
Another article on our inability to save REWahoo Other topics 49 03-10-2006 10:59 AM
Give life to your dreams dex Young Dreamers 14 09-19-2005 09:28 AM
Financial ducks and stuff mickeyd FIRE and Money 25 02-10-2005 10:01 AM
Term vs. whole life? retire_asap Other topics 9 10-28-2004 08:05 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:51 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.