Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 10-29-2015, 08:58 AM   #41
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
target2019's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 3,709
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goldenmom View Post
We have 2 IRAs totaling nearly 800K and a small individual 401k with 24K. I'm researching the lazy portfolios and am interested in adding a small value tilt. The only fund I have bought so far is Vanguard Intermediate-Term Treasury Fund Admiral Shares in my husband's account. I like the idea of a lazy portfolio that will do OK if the bear is growling. Coffeehouse?
The 401k is 3% of total. That could be a good fit for a REIT fund or small/midcap tilt. Have to evaluate the choice for expenses, though.

You have three spaces to invest in, and can take that into account when laying out the overall AA. With doing that, you'll have options for rebalancing, without needing to add funds in a given space when you need to rebalance.
__________________

__________________
target2019 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 10-29-2015, 12:59 PM   #42
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Lynchburg
Posts: 101
Great suggestions. Thanks!
__________________

__________________
Goldenmom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2015, 02:15 AM   #43
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
photoguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 2,301
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goldenmom View Post
Photoguy, what do you think about the Vanguard High Yield Corporate bond fund - VWEAX? I have read that it has a low default rate with a moderate amount of risk. As you know, the investment grade bonds have unattractive yields and rate increase risk.
I'm not a fan of high yield or junk bonds. If I wanted more risk in my portfolio I would simply increase the percentage of equities and correspondingly reduce the amount of bonds.

Quote:
I keep reading that even the riskier bond funds are not anywhere near the risk of stock funds. I'm wondering if I could increase portfolio income by including some riskier high-yield corporate bonds while minimizing equity exposure.
I would say HY bond funds can be very risky, even approaching that of equity funds. Take a look at the performance chart I included from morningstar and decide for yourself (VFINX = vanguard S&P 500, VBTLX = vanguard total bond).

When I look at the graph, I see Vanguard's HY fund taking a huge dive in 2008 right when I would want my bond funds to do well. In contrast, the total bond fund, which is heavily US gov based, had an up year which is exactly what I want to happen when my equities tank.

Quote:
Also, a question about small value tilt. Did you recommend US Small Value - VISVX because Vanguard's International Value Fund - VTRIX has a .44% expense ratio and a risk level of 5?
I don't see VISVX and VTRIX as competing funds because one is US and the other is international. For US funds, I mostly use VISVX to cover small value simply because there are not a lot of other options if you want to stay with vanguard.

For international, VTRIX is vanguard's only choice for a value fund but I use iShares EFV for this slot instead. This is due to several reasons which include VTRIX being actively managed, EFV being more "valuey" on measures like price/book, and EFV is slightly cheaper (expense ratio of 0.4%).


Quote:
I seeing where many are moving away from U.S. securities. What international and/or global Vanguard funds would you recommend to replace or supplement Total US Stock Market Index- VTSAX? I see that Vanguard has Total International Stock Index, Total World Stock Index, and Global Minimum Volatility funds.
This is not a recommendation but here is a partial list of the funds that I have in my portfolio. Some of these funds are extremely volatile. I think the emerging market fund was down 60-70% in 2008/9 from it's prior peak.

VEA - Vanguard developed market
VSS - Vanguard international small cap
VWO - Vanguard emerging market
VNQI - Vanguard ex-US real estate
EFV - iShares international value

Note that my own portfolio is a big mess with far too many funds that were collected in too many investing accounts.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg VWEAX-VBTLX-VFINX.jpg (176.8 KB, 20 views)
__________________
photoguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2015, 09:41 AM   #44
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
pb4uski's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Vermont & Sarasota, FL
Posts: 16,481
Quote:
Originally Posted by photoguy View Post
....Note that my own portfolio is a big mess with far too many funds that were collected in too many investing accounts.
I have one of those too! I could easily straighten it out if it were not for capital gains taxes.
__________________
If something cannot endure laughter.... it cannot endure.
Patience is the art of concealing your impatience.
Slow and steady wins the race.
pb4uski is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2015, 05:26 PM   #45
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
nun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 4,836
I've been slowly adjusting my portfolio by selling bond funds and funds with bonds (bye-bye Wellesley) and buying equities as I get closer to the time when my pension income will start. I will soon have the following asset allocation. I plan to reinvest dividends and let the equity percentages increase as I get older. I might take interest of 4% from TIAA-Traditional each year.

VTSAX (Total Stock Index) 50%
VTIAX (International Stock Index) 16%
VBIAX (Balanced Index - this has bonds, but I'm keeping it as an experiment) 4%
TIAA-Traditional 30%
__________________
“So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.”

Current AA: 65% Equity Funds / 20% Bonds / 7% Stable Value /3% Cash / 5% TIAA Traditional
Retired Mar 2014 at age 52, target WR: 0.0%,
Income from pension and rent
nun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2015, 06:57 PM   #46
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 11,616
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goldenmom View Post
I'd be delighted for you to run the FireCalc. Thanks for taking the time. Hope guests on this forum will benefit as well.
Goldenmom,
As previously mentioned, I recommend that you step back from consideration of individual funds right now and instead look at the big picture—your desired withdrawal strategy and rate, some consideration of macro asset allocations (e.g. approx percentage in bond, stocks, “cash” etc). FIRECalc is a >great< tool for just trying things out. It’s got many decades of data from the most significant asset classes. It doesn’t have everything , e.g. good long-term historical data on emerging market stocks just doesn’t exist, FIRECalc doesn’t break down the US market into the smallest of subcategories, etc. But you really don’t need any of that. FIRECalc can help you answer this very big question: “Over the entire modern history of equity markets, if I had invested my money in X mix of assets and if I had withdrawn it using X method, what would the results have been?”
I strongly urge you to go to the link and spend some time trying out various withdrawal methods and asset mixes. Don’t try to optimize the mix to the nearest nit--understand that the future won’t be exactly like any of these past sequences.
So, here’s something to get you started. We’ll start with the “given” that your portfolio is $800K and that you are interested in a 35 year timeframe (when your husband will be 105). You’ve said that your baseline requirement might be $12K per year in withdrawal from the portfolio, though circumstances could change and you’d need more.
Approach: Fixed withdrawals adjusted annually for inflation. Very predictable withdrawal amounts, but if the withdrawal rate exceeds the growth rate of the portfolio, it can go to zero.
Scenario 1: $12K starting withdrawal, invested 100% in 5 year US Treasuries. Treasuries are a very safe investment. The chart below shows that there was not a single case in the 110 different starting years when the portfolio would have gone broke supporting this level of spending. In fact, the historic success rate for 35 years (invested in 100% 5 year US treasuries) would still be 100% if the withdrawals had started at $27k per year, though the average ending balance would be a lot less. Now, we know that Treasuries today aren’t yielding very much above inflation, but this isn’t the first time that has happened, either. In every previous case, they would have supported the given level of spending with the given starting balance—that’s good to know. (click on the graph to enlarge it. Also note that the scales on the various charts are not the same, so you'll need to look at the labels). Don't get bogged down looking at individual lines, the important thing is the general trend and the extremes.
GM_F_Treas.JPG

Scenario 2. Fixed $12K withdrawals (adjusted for inflation) from a portfolio of 50% US Stocks and 50% 5-year Treasuries. The graph below shows the results of 110 different starting years at this asset mix and withdrawal rate. It had a 100% success rate. The average ending balance is about 2.6 million (present year) dollars. The success rate remained at 100% at a starting withdrawal value of up to $28K per year. So, compared to 100% treasuries, having half the portfolio in stocks improved the average ending balance >and< allowed (slightly) higher withdrawals with the same 100% historical portfolio success rate. Did stocks increase the annual volatility of the portfolio—yes. Did that matter at all? It doesn’t seem that it did--no increase in "failures", slightly higher withdrawals supported.
GM_F_5050.JPG

Variable withdrawals: Let’s assume that you are willing to vary the amount that you take out of the portfolio every year based on how well it has done, rather than sticking with a fixed withdrawal amount. In the real world, most people would probably do this—tightening their belts if their investments are down, and taking that nicer vacation if the portfolio is gaining against inflation. With your $800K portfolio and a need to spend only $12K per year, you would have a withdrawal rate of just 1.5%. As a general reference, most people on this site are probably planning to withdraw between 2.5% and 5% per year, so your “baseline” withdrawal rate is very conservative. We already saw that very conservative investments have historically been sufficient to meet that $12K requirement. But if your spending requirements/desires went up (medical costs, a desire to travel, etc), what would historically have been safe?

Scenario 3: Withdraw 4% of end-of year balance each year, “95% rule”, invested in 50% 5 year Treasuries, 50% total US stock market: Each year you’d withdraw 4% of your portfolio balance (so, $32K in the first year), or 95% of the amount you withdrew the previous year (whichever is greater). The graph below is different from the ones above, it doesn’t show account balances, it shows the amount we would be withdrawing under this rule, and the amounts are adjusted for inflation (so, everything is in 2015 dollars). You can see that, historically, 50% stock/50% treasuries portfolio starting at $800K would have supported 4% withdrawals and in no case would annual withdrawals dipped below the $12k baseline you’ve described. FIRECalc also shows the graph of annual account balances, I just didn’t include it here, but the average ending portfolio value after 35 years was $853K. Since this is inflation-adjusted to 2015 dollars, we can see that portfolio generally did a good job of supporting this withdrawal rate while not being drawn down.

GM_V_5050.JPG

Scenario 4: Maybe the 4% withdrawal rate of Scenario 3 is attractive, but the idea of having 50% in stocks isn't. How would things have worked out with the same 4% variable withdrawal rate (and using the "95% rule") with the entire portfolio invested in 5 Year treasuries (as in Scenario 1)? Here's the chart of annual withdrawals:
GM_V_Treas_spend.JPG
Hmm. The general path of the lines is a lot different from Scenario 3, with annual withdrawals generally declining. Yes, those Treasuries had low annual volatility and were very "safe", but a retiree using only treasuries and needing to take 4% per year would generally have faced a hit in the real spending power of their annual withdrawals. The Treasuries just haven't generated sufficient returns. A look at the annual balances tells the tale. The average ending portfolio value was $385K, less than half the starting value.
GM_V_Treas_Bal.JPG


That's probably enough to give you an idea of how the program works. I'm far from an expert in FIRECalc, but there are plenty of people here who are, and who can answer any questions you might have. Finally, keep in mind that the data in FIRECalc is largely for the US and the most detailed data for asset classes begins in 1927. This is a period of prosperity in the US, and the US was the most prosperous economy in the world over much of this span. So, some people might urge caution when using the data to build plans for the future. Still, a tool like this at least gives you something to use as a starting point. And, if you want, there are ways to "trick" FIRECalc if you want to see the impact of returns that were a few percentage points less than they have been historically. Enjoy.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Goldenmom View Post
Can you remind me what portfolio(s) you favor?
Not to be a wiseacre, but I favor everyone building a portfolio that suits their needs. My personal portfolio has a high stock allocation (85+ %), and the stocks in it are slightly tilted to value stocks. We have a higher-than-market weighting to small cap stocks, too. So, it's "Swedrow-esqe", but far less radical than his "only small and value" proposal. Our withdrawals will be made using a "percent of end-of-year balance" method. But that fits our requirements, and it might be a very bad choice for someone else.
__________________
"Freedom begins when you tell Mrs. Grundy to go fly a kite." - R. Heinlein
samclem is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2015, 08:40 PM   #47
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Lynchburg
Posts: 101
Photoguy, Samclem, and other forum friends,
Imagine my surprise when I opened my email this morning to find a long email from Larry Swedroe in response to questions I emailed him last night about the "Larry" portfolio. I thought it was incredibly nice of him to take time to help a non-client.

I've made a few buys this week--Intermediate-term Treasury Fund and TSM for my husband's IRA and some small-cap and small cap value funds for my smaller IRA. I also got some International Explorer Investor (VINEX) for my account which has a higher ER than my other funds. It invests in foreign small cap and made me think of Larry. Hope that wasn't a mistake!

It's difficult to find Vanguard funds for U.S small value and International small to build the Larry portfolio so I may not get the desired effect. Apparently, Vanguard funds are not "valuey" enough.

I'd love to know what the rest of you have used for these classes if you are including small value funds. Photoguy, thanks for the fund suggestions you gave me earlier in this thread.

I continue to study the lazy portfolios and will start Larry's Black Swan book next. I'm holding off on REITS & TIPS & EM for now and will wait on any more bonds until I see what Janet does in December. I may follow Larry's advice and do a CD ladder.

I'm looking at the Value Index Fund (VVIAX) and Developed Markets Index (VTMGX), but need to read more about those to see if they would boost the portfolio or just complicate it and add expense. I'm steering away from the other bond funds and the Total International Stock Index Fund for now. I'm only holding one fund from the Vanguard advisor's "canned" portfolio so far--TSM (VTSAX).

I'm not all in yet, but my ship has left the shore.
__________________
Goldenmom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2015, 09:10 PM   #48
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
nun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 4,836
These lazy portfolios and the Vanguard advisors suggestion that have a high percentage of intermediate bond index funds would have been great 10 or 20 years ago. But given the low rate environment right now are they good things to include in the portfolio of someone at the beginning of retirement. It seems to me that they will be a drag on any portfolio for the next 10 years and if you use them for income you are stepping right into a sequence of returns problem. If you want capital preservation what about TIPS.
__________________
“So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.”

Current AA: 65% Equity Funds / 20% Bonds / 7% Stable Value /3% Cash / 5% TIAA Traditional
Retired Mar 2014 at age 52, target WR: 0.0%,
Income from pension and rent
nun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2015, 12:41 AM   #49
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
photoguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 2,301
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goldenmom View Post
I'd love to know what the rest of you have used for these classes if you are including small value funds.
If you really want to dig deeper into this, it may help to do a google search on bogleheads for small value funds (e.g. type "site:bogleheads.org small value funds" into google).

It will turn up threads that discuss various options outside of DFA. For example,

https://www.bogleheads.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=157992 (poll on best small cap value funds)

Note that the funds discussed may have significant drawbacks like tiny AUM and low trading volumes. Or a fund may have good value loadings but negative momentum. Posters on bogleheads will discuss the pros and cons of these funds endlessly and and will even run the regressions to calculate various factor loadings.

It's been a while since I looked at this but I ended up using primarily vanguard & iShares funds even if there were others that were "more valuey" or better on some other metric. If I had access to DFA, I would use those funds.

Quote:
I continue to study the lazy portfolios and will start Larry's Black Swan book next. I'm holding off on REITS & TIPS & EM for now and will wait on any more bonds until I see what Janet does in December. I may follow Larry's advice and do a CD ladder.
Keep in mind that value funds and EM/REITS tend to be very volatile. These types of funds are also not typically covered in the data used by retirement calculators like FireCalc.
__________________
photoguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2015, 09:08 AM   #50
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 68
Samclem thanks for the detailed post. Goldenmom good luck with your choices. Everyone else thanks for the knowledge.

Situation is similar to Goldenmom's and will post after discussion with Vanguard's portfolio advisor.
__________________
wyecrabber1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2015, 04:24 PM   #51
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 3,863
I don't see that any of the small value funds I use is that much more valuey than VISVX. VBR, Vanguard's ETF, looks a little different. IJS is another ETF alternative.
__________________
Animorph is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2015, 04:45 PM   #52
Recycles dryer sheets
Dogman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Chandler
Posts: 50
For this bunch of investment experts could you give me an explanation of why REITS are usually listed at only 5 to 10% of a portfolio? Many good REITS pay 5+ percent with slow growth.
I presently own VER, GNL, NYRT, and O.
__________________
Dogman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2015, 05:24 PM   #53
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
braumeister's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Northern Kentucky
Posts: 8,630
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dogman View Post
For this bunch of investment experts could you give me an explanation of why REITS are usually listed at only 5 to 10% of a portfolio?
I'm certainly not an expert, but since REITs are not highly correlated with stocks or bonds, they serve as a good diversification. There are only so many slices you can get out of a pie, and it's just one of them.
__________________
braumeister is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2015, 08:24 PM   #54
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Lynchburg
Posts: 101
Happy Halloween, Forum friends,
Love your feedback and I look forward to reading and pondering every reply.

I'm reading everything I can about Larry's small value tilt in order to limit my stock exposure.

At this time I'm looking for the most effective small value tilt funds which I can buy through our Vanguard accounts. (DFA and some others are not available so I must find ones that will work.)

I'm considering buying these 2 funds based on articles I've read by Larry:

1. VG Small Cap Value ETF (VBR) and

2. iShares Morningstar Small Cap Value ETF (JKL)


What do you think of these two to build the Larry Portfolio?

In his 10/30 email to me Larry Swedroe said:

"As to bonds, first likely better off buying CDs in tax advantaged accounts as they have much higher yields than Treasuries and you don't pay any fund expenses, and if build a ladder of them, say averaging 4-5 years you won't have too much inflation risk and thus have less need for TIPS. Right now the risk premium in TIPS relative to CDs is pretty higher and thus IMO not worth it for most people. Relative to Treasuries they look better. Example, 10 year Treasury yielding about 2%, 10 year TIP about 0.5 but 10 year CD about 3%."

Goldenmom's questions:
Which of these small value funds would you buy?

Vanguard Explorer Value Fund Investor Shares VEVFX .66%
Vanguard International Explorer Fund Investor Shares VINEX .40%
Vanguard Small-Cap Index Fund Admiral Shares VSMAX .09
Vanguard Small-Cap Value Index Fund Admiral VSIAX .09%
Vanguard Strategic Small-Cap Equity Fund Investor Shares VSTCX .38%

What is the policy at Vanguard for oops! purchases? Can I exchange a fund for another with no additional fee? What is the consequence for selling funds if I find I may have made a mistake with a bond or fund and want to get something else? I understand the price may be higher or lower when the sale goes through, but is that the extent of the damage?

Thanks and enjoy the pretty fall leaves when you are not checking your investments. As they say on Game of Thrones, winter is coming. Perhaps that got a smile from you snowbirds in FLA. It was a nippy day in central Virginia and a perfect day for homemade beef barley soup. I enjoyed reading about small value tilting while soup simmered in the slow cooker. I don't see why investing and cooking could not be combined on these forums for added enjoyment. Have a nice Sunday!

I appreciate all your help with preserving and growing our retirement nest egg. Medicare and insurance premiums are going up and our Golden Retriever continues to expect his premium dog food twice a day. We are cutting back lifestyle, but need compounding of our assets so we don't run out of money before we run out of breath.

Goldenmom
__________________
Goldenmom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2015, 08:45 PM   #55
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
nun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 4,836
It's good to do your research and understand what you are buying, but as long as you have an AA that you like and achieve that with low cost funds you will be ok. Choose the least expensive index funds in the sectors you want. Don't go "fund happy"......keep it simple.
__________________
“So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.”

Current AA: 65% Equity Funds / 20% Bonds / 7% Stable Value /3% Cash / 5% TIAA Traditional
Retired Mar 2014 at age 52, target WR: 0.0%,
Income from pension and rent
nun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2015, 09:02 PM   #56
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 11,616
Which funds does Swedrow recommend?
It is important to realize that Swedrow's "Just buy small and value equities" approach is not mainstream, it's not what most academics or practitioners recommend for their clients. They recommend a broader asset mix. Larry Swedrow's approach will work if the future is like the past. The more "targeted" the approach, the less diversified the approach, the more dependent it is on the particulars of the environment. I believe in the higher volatility-adjusted returns of small and value stocks, and that's why I've tilted my investments that way, but I'm not going "all in" with it because I only get one chance to get this right. If things change and big companies and growth companies are the ones which keep well ahead of inflation for the next 3 decades, I can't afford to totally miss out. So, I have some of them, and I'll be rebalancing across asset classes to take advantage of the times when "growth" and "value" swap places as darlings of the market.
There are a lot of people who confuse "volatility" and "risk." They are absolutely not the same.
__________________
"Freedom begins when you tell Mrs. Grundy to go fly a kite." - R. Heinlein
samclem is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2015, 09:45 PM   #57
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Mulligan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 7,384
Quote:
Originally Posted by braumeister View Post
I'm certainly not an expert, but since REITs are not highly correlated with stocks or bonds, they serve as a good diversification. There are only so many slices you can get out of a pie, and it's just one of them.

That is certainly true, Braumeister. In addition I believe experts want a person to avoid sector concentration of any type. And REITS all collectively will usually have a uniform reaction good and bad to interest rate movements and economic conditions.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
__________________
Mulligan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-31-2015, 10:09 PM   #58
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 3,863
Look at the fees for each fund you want to sell. They should list a short-term redemption fee of x% if you sell within X days. They may also not let you buy back into the same fund for X days after selling shares. Not sure what Vanguard does, but sometimes there is an additional transaction fee if a "no transaction fee" mutual fund is sold short-term. That would only potentially apply to non-Vanguard funds. Each fund might have slightly different rules.
__________________
Animorph is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2015, 05:05 PM   #59
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Lynchburg
Posts: 101
samclem, you have voiced my reservations exactly. For now, I'm limiting small value buys to my smaller IRA and considering a more mainstream approach (3 Fund, Swensen, Coffeehouse, Merriman) for my husband's larger IRA. I'm looking at portfolios that have larger fixed income allocations and are thought to do well in either bull or bear markets.

I emailed Larry again this morning for specific help in choosing funds that I can get through Vanguard that are "smaller and more valuey." I listed ones I've seen in his and other articles and asked him for his top picks. I think I can get the iShares funds at Vanguard, for example, but cannot get DFA or the Bridgeway Omni Small Value Fund.

Thanks for the info on the FIRECALC. My husband will have to help me get started with that. I'm not a math person and it looks confusing to me, but he is an engineer and can explain it. It looks like a great planning tool and I thank you for the introduction.

I will report back on what Larry says and keep digging.
__________________
Goldenmom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2015, 05:28 PM   #60
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 8,627
This discussion is quite a stretch from the starting point with an Ameriprise advisor, then an expensive uninformed CFP, then a Vanguard rep, then an anonymous internet forums.
__________________

__________________
LOL! is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
advisor or no advisor frank FIRE and Money 10 04-29-2014 07:58 AM
Evaluate My Portfolio: Concerns about advisor ctly8b Young Dreamers 10 10-21-2013 07:39 PM
Please Review this Portfolio Proposal bUU FIRE and Money 72 05-30-2013 06:42 AM
Vanguard Advisor Dan Wiener DFW_M5 FIRE and Money 3 01-30-2004 09:14 AM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:40 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.