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Old 11-16-2010, 09:58 PM   #61
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60% equity mutual funds 40% bond mutual fund and stable value fund (i left some in 401k as sv better than st bond funds lately)
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Old 11-17-2010, 12:45 AM   #62
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Originally Posted by teejayevans View Post
Did you get this info via web site or did one of the VG advisors gives you this info?
TJ
Hi, TJ,

I got it off my personal section of the Vanguard web site. They have an automated portfolio analysis feature. I suspect it is somewhat simplified behind the curtain but it is interesting. Something to think about at least.
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Old 11-17-2010, 12:51 AM   #63
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I suppose I should mention that after reading Bernstein's first book and his web site for a few years plus the articles in SoundAdvice, I figured that 75/25 equities/bonds was reasonable for me. I have been sneaking up on it slowly.
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Old 11-17-2010, 12:57 AM   #64
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35% equities 65% bonds & cash
Alan, I like the VG portfolio watch of your allocation. Especially the only 17% down years.

I may eventually lose my nerve and move that direction. I am still in my accumulation phase so damn the torpedoes.
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Old 11-17-2010, 08:10 AM   #65
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I have vastly different AAs between my taxable and IRA accounts because I am an ER who needs the dividend income from my taxable accounts to cover my expenses while my IRA has time to grow for at least another 13 years. The AA of my IRA has been about the same as it was when it was my 401(k) from most of my working days (excluding the additional freebie company stock).

Taxable accounts: 28/72 stock/bond
IRA: 59/41
Overall: 38/62
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Old 12-19-2010, 09:29 PM   #66
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Welcome to the forum.

40/60 AA
Rationale: chicken feathers
I just did some year end housecleaning, i.e. reducing the number of funds and eliminating the last of the higher expense ratio mutual funds I have in my retirement portfolio. It is now a very manageable number.
I did as many exchanges (not outright sells) as I could. I have some TLH carryover to offset some of the gains.

New AA is 30/57/13.

I'm going to let this percolate for a little while until I see a better place to put my 13% TE money market stash (VYFXX). I am closely following a thread about what to do with cash reserves. Mr Boston is helping me by playing devil's advocate when I research potential landing spots for the money market stash.
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Old 12-20-2010, 02:16 PM   #67
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For grins, I averaged the 33 posts that had allocations and the average is 53%/47%.

My own allocation is 55/45, so I must be an average Zero.
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Old 12-20-2010, 04:14 PM   #68
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Domestic Large Cap Funds 34.2%
Domestic Mid Cap Funds 9.7%
Domestic Small Cap Funds 8.4%
Foreign Funds 26.6%
Specialty Funds (REITs) 3.6%
Cash 2.8%
Bonds 4.4%
Stocks (mostly large, dividend paying companies) 9.5%

I am 41, probably working to 57 due to need/desire to keep Fed Health Benefits. Will have FERS pension (30% of high-3). Cash doesn't include my emergency fund/general savings, only what is in my brokerage account and currently not invested.
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Old 12-20-2010, 05:32 PM   #69
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60 years old.

Large Cap Index Funds 10%
Mid Cap Index Funds 10.5%
Small Cap Index and Managed Funds 10.4%
International Managed Fund 16.2%
Emerging Market Index Funds 3.8%
REIT Index Funds 5.1%
Natural Resource Index Funds 5.1%
Domestic Managed Bond Fund 33.4%
International Managed Bond Funds 2.9%
TIP Index Funds 2.2%
Cash 0.4%

The managed funds are primarily in my 401K and index funds in my IRA. I usually rebalance to 60/40 in January when I make my IRA contribution.

Milkman
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Old 12-20-2010, 06:18 PM   #70
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47 years old and anywhere from 5 months to 8 years from retirement, depending on job outlook and how I feel :-)

Currently 63% equities - VTSAX and VGTSX
27% inflation protected securities VIPSX and VAIPX
10% cash
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Old 12-20-2010, 09:15 PM   #71
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My targets are:

60% equities - 12% international (VGTSX) 48% domestic (VTSAX)
40% fixed income (VBTLX and HABDX)

I prefer the simplicity of just 4 CUSIPs, but am considering adding REIT and precious metals exposure through index funds when I rebalance.

All fixed income are in tax deferred accounts (401K and regular IRA) so distributions are not currently taxable

I'm 55 and still working 50% time - but ready to get FIREd anytime.
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Old 12-20-2010, 10:06 PM   #72
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Is everyone just using the fund description for their allocation or the actual holdings of their funds? All my funds are Fidelity funds and a number of them hold a pretty high cash position. I therefore end up with a higher cash position than if I just looked at the funds themselves.

I am 53 with 4-8 years before retirement. Current positions using Fidelity portfolio analysis tool:

63% domestic equity
15% foreign equity (much in domestic funds such as Low Priced Stock)
14% bond
8% cash (primarily emergency reserve but in many of the funds, too)

Marc
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Old 12-20-2010, 10:09 PM   #73
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I use the M* X-ray tool to tell me what my actual asset allocation is.

The Fidelity portfolio analysis tool tells me that some of my international ETFs are 100% US stocks which is totally wrong.
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Old 12-21-2010, 06:41 AM   #74
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Is everyone just using the fund description for their allocation or the actual holdings of their funds?

Marc
I'm using the Portfolio Watch results from Vanguard. I believe that Portfolio Watch looks through the funds to the underlying securites. Since my funds are mostly index funds they are mostly fully invested in their respective security types and hold minimal cash.
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Old 12-22-2010, 05:20 PM   #75
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Well? IAD.. ItAllDepends.. for what purpose?
-For Growth
And then (a) To make as Much as You can? > 70/30 mix
(b) ModerateGrowth > 60/40 to 50/50
(c) Conservative Growth > 40/60 down to 30/70

afew yrs B4 and in Post Retirement? 40/60 down to 10/90
and that AllDepends on How much you have and how much you need to make on it and How much you need to take out of it.

Post Retirement: VWINX, BERIX & RPSIX as examples.. adding some extra Bonds with higher Ylds.. TGLMX, DTLNX and a dash of EMD's like FNMIX or TGEIX..

Some I know, need Nottin out of their Retirement Savings, their Pensions and SS more than pay the bills ( Like Rich teachers and unions ..lol ) and just want to get some safer growth for their Heirs and they go with 40/60-50/50 and into funds like VWINX ( Balfund) and add a VIMSX ( Mid cap Index) orVFINX.. or just run a 50/50 into a VWINX & VWELX or A PRPFX.

Examples only- always ck with your Spouce before investing into anything..She might have other ideas for tht $.. ;-)

If you're not very experienced on Inwesting? I suggest you start out with using BALANCED FUNDS.. Like VWELX, FPACX & PRWCX. Just like hiring a FA to run the show for you and you can learn alot watching what they do over the next 5-10 yrs..
Very few have Done better than those Bal Funds, trying to manage their own Port of Several Sector funds..

I know I and most of my Buddies never could,so we all gave up and went into Mostly Balanced and Bond Funds before we lost too much of our $..way back in the Mid 90's..
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Old 12-22-2010, 05:43 PM   #76
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I'm using the Portfolio Watch results from Vanguard. I believe that Portfolio Watch looks through the funds to the underlying securites. Since my funds are mostly index funds they are mostly fully invested in their respective security types and hold minimal cash.
It is well-known that the Vanguard Portfolio Watch tool is fatally flawed. It actually does not look through many funds to the underlying securities. The Morningstar Portfolio X-ray tool does however, so it is much better.

Vanguard PW tells you nothing about the large:mid:small ratio of your foreign funds. When it does a style-grid of your assets, it is only including domestic funds (not stocks!) and excluding foreign assets. Yes, it clearly labels what it is doing, so you should not be fooled, but many folks don't read carefully.
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Old 12-22-2010, 10:04 PM   #77
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It is well-known that the Vanguard Portfolio Watch tool is fatally flawed. It actually does not look through many funds to the underlying securities. The Morningstar Portfolio X-ray tool does however, so it is much better.

Vanguard PW tells you nothing about the large:mid:small ratio of your foreign funds. When it does a style-grid of your assets, it is only including domestic funds (not stocks!) and excluding foreign assets. Yes, it clearly labels what it is doing, so you should not be fooled, but many folks don't read carefully.
I just ran both for my portfolio and the results were very similar:

Asset Allocation PW X-Ray
Stocks 61.4% 62% (50% US, 12% Foreign)
Bonds 38.6% 38% (28% Bonds, 10% Cash)

Stocks
US 81.6% 81%
International 18.4% 19%

Large Cap 64% 75%
Mid Cap 28% 18%
Small Cap 8% 6%

Bonds
Credit Quality
High 28.2% 37%
Med 71.8% 63%
Low
Interest Rate Sensitivity
High 71.8% 63%
Med 28.2% 37%
Low

Average expense ratio 25 bps 25 bps

While I admit that I like the Morningstar style-boxes better, the results are so similar I think that "fatally flawed" is a bit of an overstatement, at least for my relatively simple portfolio.
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Old 12-22-2010, 10:06 PM   #78
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While I admit that I like the Morningstar style-boxes better, the results are so similar I think that "fatally flawed" is a bit of an overstatement, at least for my relatively simple portfolio.
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Old 12-23-2010, 07:28 PM   #79
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Married, 62 and 59. Retired 3 yrs ago

47.4% in various Vanguard stock index funds (mostly VTSMX)
23.8% in Vanguard money market
23.9% in dividend producing stocks
4.9% in purely speculative stocks
0% in Bonds

note: I made some good money in a Vanguard Bond Fund (and got out) and with a 6% CD at PenFed that matured. For a while, I'm ok with 23.8% of my money temporarily in a money market.

I watch my acct at Vanguard closely and I may lighten up on stocks in January as I have been real lucky with those dividend producing stocks and speculative stocks.
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