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What Were Your Final Months of W*rk Like?
Old 02-28-2013, 08:32 AM   #1
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What Were Your Final Months of W*rk Like?

It seems to me that once it becomes common knowledge you are leaving a job you are treated differently. No longer invited to important meetings, no longer asked your opinion, no longer included in functions, etc. You become a kind of ghost employee. For every job I ever left I wanted to do the best to train a replacement. In most cases it was not solicited or accepted. When trying to train a replacement I actually had them fall asleep. None seemed particularly interested. My final job I was asked to stay on for 6 months as a contingency (my job had been eliminated). For busywork I was told to document everything that had gone on in the 12 years I had led the project. As I had nothing else to do I threw myself into the task. When I left no one asked me for the document, no one asked me for my opinion on the future of the project, no exit interview. Just turned in my badge and left. I notice other people in similar positions had the same treatment. Not sour grapes, just wondering if others experienced this type of thing. Worked at the same mega-corp for over 30 years. Have some felt engaged until the day they left? Just kind of a gnowing feeling that you wanted to contribute but it wasn't wanted.
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Old 02-28-2013, 08:44 AM   #2
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Although I have no doubt it happens, none of that happened to me. If anything, people wanted to talk to me more. If for no other reason, just to hear me be ridiculous. At which I was expert
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Old 02-28-2013, 08:48 AM   #3
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I agree 100%, that is why I am surprised people give such long notices. I was planning to retire in April, but got laid off in Feb in a huge re-org. Basically no one talked to me even though they told me I should be available to support the change. I work remotely, so it was so strange. In fact, my password expired and I didn't even bother to recover it.

The same thing happened to my husband....they asked him to record his "thoughts" on all the technical systems he installed - of course during the last week there. LOL He offered to do a presentation and they could film him - but then no one set it up.

That is why I recommend giving 2 weeks notice.
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Old 02-28-2013, 08:58 AM   #4
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It seems like things end not with a bang...but with a whimper.
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Old 02-28-2013, 09:04 AM   #5
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I found out that I was getting an early out offer in October but my last day was not until March 1. I kept it a secret as long as possible. Those last couple of months were tedious. I came in late, took a long lunch hour and left early. No one really wanted to deal with me knowing that they would have to do it all over again with my successor. I didn't take it personally, it is human nature exacerbated by the company culture.
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Old 02-28-2013, 09:10 AM   #6
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OP, what you describe is precisely why I did not let my direct reports know I was retiring until 30 days before I pulled the plug. I did tell my boss of my plans five months in advance, and the folks in the executive office suite all knew what I was retiring, but they all agreed it was best to wait until I had a month to go before announcing my planned departure. That allowed me to avoid a prolonged period of lame duckyness...
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Old 02-28-2013, 09:22 AM   #7
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I didn't experience any of that but I had a somewhat unique role as a subject matter expert so people in the field would call me in when they had a client issue within my wheelhouse. While I let my boss and other leaders of the practice know I was leaving months in advance, we soft pedaled it, made no big announcement, and let it leak out over the last month or so. People kept coming to me for consultations up until I left - in fact I even got a couple calls after I left since I kept my home office phone number.

I can see that it might be an issue for more conventional situations.
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Old 02-28-2013, 09:54 AM   #8
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Although I have no doubt it happens, none of that happened to me. If anything, people wanted to talk to me more.
Same here. For me, I was busy as heck up to the end. I retired just after our annual audit so I was busy with auditors and trying to train my replacement at the same time.

I left on good terms and they gave me a nice retirement party and gifts(golf cart). The cart turned out to be a payment for lot's of phone calls/questions for a few months after I left. But I didn't mind, they were usually quick and painless.
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Old 02-28-2013, 10:36 AM   #9
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That is why I recommend giving 2 weeks notice.
Seconded. I've never given more than two weeks, and never would. I'll do anything during those last two weeks to make the transition as painless as possible. Train replacement, stay late, work overtime, weekends, whatever. But two weeks is it, and once I'm gone, I'm gone. I never look back - have to devote 100% of effort on that new job, not the old one.
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Old 02-28-2013, 10:42 AM   #10
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One of my coworkers and I were the only two trained specialists in a technically demanding job, and we both retired within a couple of months of each other. Our supervisor knew about the situation a year in advance, but had difficulty getting permission from management to hire replacements until it became a crisis. Then the first round of hires was a complete bust - the one guy they brought in turned out to be great at interviewing but totally incompetent actually doing the job. Then my coworker left and I was doing two jobs for a while. Luckily the second round of interviews turned up two good replacements, who started only a couple of weeks before my last day.

All in all, a rather dicey transition. I certainly never felt ignored or neglected, but both my coworker and I spent the last six months of our careers as caretakers, doing the routine day-to-day tasks but not allowed to start any more ambitious projects due to the uncertainty of what would happen after we left.
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Old 02-28-2013, 10:50 AM   #11
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My days and weeks were filled with sheer boredom, lack of enthusiasm, apathy and anticipation of not having to participate in the near future. Time crawled by slowly.
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Old 02-28-2013, 10:58 AM   #12
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I enjoyed my last few months, handing over my projects and training my replacements, never felt like a lame duck. I continued to attend the usual meetings etc.
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Old 02-28-2013, 11:15 AM   #13
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My days and weeks were filled with sheer boredom, lack of enthusiasm, apathy and anticipation of not having to participate in the near future. Time crawled by slowly.
That sounds like me right now, but I'm still (hopefully) two years away from giving notice!
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Old 02-28-2013, 11:26 AM   #14
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I've told folks at work that my goal is to retire at 55. (I'm 51). I've also told folks that if I get a severance - stick a fork in me, I'm done.

When I pull the trigger I plan to give 2 weeks notice - just the same as if I were changing jobs. Period. I'm a good engineer - but I can be replaced... The powers that be have made it clear that they consider all engineers to be exchangeable commodities and no one is irreplaceable.
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Old 02-28-2013, 11:46 AM   #15
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A new worldwide standard for announcing a retirement has been set. If the pope can give two weeks, then certainly anyone else can also.
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Old 02-28-2013, 12:00 PM   #16
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My last six months were pretty calm as my replacement was named with about five months to go. I spent the last few months travelling around to various operations saying my good byes to my colleagues/clients of the last 20+ years. As I wasn't going to be around I avoided getting wrapped up in budgets for the coming fiscal year which was a huge relief. All in all a very pleasurable way to fade away into the sunset.
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Old 02-28-2013, 12:00 PM   #17
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A new worldwide standard for announcing a retirement has been set. If the pope can give two weeks, then certainly anyone else can also.
I had not thought about this but may steal it if my BS bucket ever completely overfloweth.

And, thanks for making me smile this morning!
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Old 02-28-2013, 12:14 PM   #18
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When I retired, I gave three months notice. I also said that I'd be willing to work "a little longer" if my boss had trouble replacing me.

I ended up working an extra six months.

It was better than most work. I was working on the type of project I enjoyed, and I finally left when the project was over (and he really did find a replacement). I could blow off some of the corporate HR stuff I never liked. The only problem was that I was a little too busy. Year-end bonuses came up after I had retired, but retirees are eligible for partial bonuses. I got a check and a nice letter from my former boss thanking me for staying.

I wasn't at all like quitting and going to work for a competitor.
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Old 02-28-2013, 12:42 PM   #19
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A new worldwide standard for announcing a retirement has been set. If the pope can give two weeks, then certainly anyone else can also.
Yes, but will you fly away in a helicopter?
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Old 02-28-2013, 01:00 PM   #20
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I knew what the OP described was going to happen to me so I was prepared. We announced my retirement in mid-Sept with my departure date being mid Dec. My staff were reassigned to other supervisors within the first month. From then on it was pretty slow up until Thanksgiving. After that there was literally nothing to do. I came in late, took long lunches, and left early. No one cared. I got a nice retirement party and that was that.
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