Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-08-2016, 12:35 PM   #61
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
harley's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Following the nice weather
Posts: 6,418
First full time job at 15, although I had started working at 11 (paper route, farm hand, lawns, snow, leaves, etc.). Actually it was two part timers, since child labor laws wouldn't let me work enough hours at one job. By the time I was 16 I had a full time job plus did odd jobs for extra cash, as well as the rare paying music gig. So I guess 18, when I graduated high school. I was ready to move out at 16, but I couldn't rent a room at that age. I paid my way own through college. I did come back to Mom's house some for summers, but I paid rent and only slept there, no meals or anything. When I came back in the fall of my junior year and found that my bedroom had been converted to a den I gave it up and stayed in my house at college from then on.
__________________

__________________
"Good judgment comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement." - Will Rogers, or maybe Sam Clemens
DW and I - FIREd at 50 (7/06), living off assets
harley is online now   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 01-08-2016, 02:34 PM   #62
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 282
Right when I graduated undergrad, age 20 (class of 89). Went to grad school on an assistantship: free tuition, 5k/yr. stipend, no car. Started gigging around, so 2nd yr. folks let me borrow a car. Graduated and got married, bought first used car ($2500), paid back our student loans totalling 30k in 2 yrs. and started house shopping. When we bought our small house they lent us 12k to bring our downpayment up to 20%, and we paid them back in a year (we're still in that house). We know the loans from parents made our start in life much easier, but we could have done it all the same with other loans it just would have cost a little more.

My brother didn't even finish a semester of CC, was on his own for some years with a stable job, but got fired and has been job hopping and living in their basement for years, now age 44. At least he pays for his own car and food, just no rent. Oh well, luckily my parents don't need rental income, they can't even spend all their income streams.

I know 25 yrs. later it's ridiculous to think 30k in loans could get you through 6 years of undergrad and grad school, kids today have it much, much harder.
__________________

__________________
igsoy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2016, 03:21 PM   #63
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 257
I am not sure what the definition of self-sustained is.

My parents did not pay for my college education beyond the first year (ages 16 to 17), so after that it was working and going to school full-time. I lived at home for 2 years but moved out at 19. My family wasn't able to give me any monetary support, they were too poor. I started working and saving babysitting money at age 13. Since I just retired at 64, that's 51 years of working at something, somewhere, for money.


Sent from my iPhone using Early Retirement Forum
__________________
iac1003 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2016, 03:24 PM   #64
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 1,433
Age 21. Married with one on the way. I worked on an asphalt paving crew in the summer and college in the winter. Somehow I managed to graduate at the same time as my HS classmates.
__________________
Retired in 2016. Living off dividends / interest and a mini pension. Freedom.
foxfirev5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2016, 08:07 PM   #65
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Yuma AZ
Posts: 270
Turned 18 just before graduating high school, and went from working part-time in a local factory to full time. Parents separated, mom had no income of her own (or ability to work) so once "child support" ended, so she became my dependent.
__________________
unno2002 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2016, 09:15 PM   #66
Full time employment: Posting here.
jjquantz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 846
Quote:
Originally Posted by igsoy View Post
...

I know 25 yrs. later it's ridiculous to think 30k in loans could get you through 6 years of undergrad and grad school, kids today have it much, much harder.
When I graduated undergrad in 1981 my student loans totaled, wait for it, $1500. That's right! Repayment schedule called for $30/month plus interest. Times have changed.
__________________
jjquantz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2016, 03:11 AM   #67
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Cocoa Beach
Posts: 406
When I joined the USAF at age 20 in 1988.
__________________
Lucantes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2016, 06:41 AM   #68
Moderator Emeritus
aja8888's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: The Woodlands, TX
Posts: 7,128
Age 17, right after I graduated high school. Alcoholic parents didn't even attend my graduation. I felt abandoned and just left, lived with friends for a while, got a job, and shortly after that, joined the Air Force.

I got out after 4 years and went to college working two jobs to pay for it. Parents were separated at that time and never acknowledged my accomplishments. I guess too much booze ruins your thinking. In later years, Dad knew I became successful but Mom had a stroke and just had no capacity to understand much of anything. I did pay for their funerals several years later. That was my inheritance.

My two younger sisters suffered similar situations as I did but took the marry young route at around 18 to get away from home.
__________________
......."Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the face." -- philosopher Mike Tyson.
aja8888 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2016, 08:32 AM   #69
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: San Jose
Posts: 172
I moved out of the family home at age 18 to attend school several states away. Tuition was free and all of my living expenses came out of scholarships until I started working full time at megacorp five years later. My parents were solidly middle-class, and while I never spent all of my stipend, I didn't give them the remainder.
__________________
dunkelblau is offline   Reply With Quote
When you had become self sustained.
Old 01-09-2016, 09:07 AM   #70
gone traveling
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,135
When you had become self sustained.

Age 21. First full time job after graduating college. Moved to Texas. Always worked part time starting age 15. Times and resources were always very tight at home. One paycheck from disaster sort of environment. It sucked at the time but now that I'm grown I see that it has made me who I am and that includes my grit and determination.

I'm struggling to get my eldest to launch. He is so different from me. At 19 he is fumbling to figure out his life direction. College first semester was a disaster. Academic probation. Not a partier. Just bad attitude toward some classes he disliked. Cry me a river, kid.

We may have given the kids too much , over compensating for what I didn't have growing up. Or just a different set of life experiences that don't easily apply right now in a traditional sense.

Either way ....this is , without question , the hardest stage of being a parent. Questioning my own parenting "success" .. as I witness his struggles ..

These posts are helpful to see that there are different paths and ages when one matures and can truly stand on their own.
__________________
papadad111 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2016, 11:45 AM   #71
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
kcowan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Pacific latitude 20/49
Posts: 5,705
Send a message via Skype™ to kcowan
Quote:
Originally Posted by papadad111 View Post
We may have given the kids too much , over compensating for what I didn't have growing up. Or just a different set of life experiences that don't easily apply right now in a traditional sense.
I believe times are tougher. It might be the transfer of wealth to the rich. But getting ahead seems to be much tougher these days than it was 40 years ago.

So I am willing to cut current parents some slack for providing too much. I still firmly believe that over-providing does not generate the independence that should be every parent's objective. Some struggle develops character!
__________________
For the fun of it...Keith
kcowan is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2016, 05:04 PM   #72
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 522
I was in college in Ireland, and flunked out. I then emigrated to the US where I joined the Marines at 20. So independent at that age. Stayed there for 6 years where I "grew up" and realized that I needed to go back to college again, but it took some lucky "aha" moments to send me in that direction. So for the parents with kids who don't seem to be able to get on with it, sometimes it seems kids' brains are just not mature enough to comprehend the future. I think mine wasn't until I got to 23 or later.

I was in the Air Wing part of the Marines, where I worked on a radar system. We had civilian tech reps there that worked for the company that made the radars. The tech rep guy in charge didn't have a college degree, but knew more than everyone else combined about the system. So I looked up to him. That's was the guy I decided to emulate when I get out. However, there were other tech reps working for him, much greener, didn't know anything. Just learning. Turns out that since they had a degree, he told me that they made more than him.

That was the big "aha" moment that I think changed the direction of my life.

Try to generate the same "aha" moments for your kids if you can.


Sent from my iPad using Early Retirement Forum
__________________
bmcgonig is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2016, 05:08 PM   #73
Moderator
Walt34's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Eastern WV Panhandle
Posts: 16,494
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmcgonig View Post
Try to generate the same "aha" moments for your kids if you can.
One of my "aha" moments was working at a gas station in high school. I was evening shift manager supervising 2 or 3 other guys. One of those guys was over fifty years old. I really, really, did not want to become him.
__________________
I heard the call to do nothing. So I answered it.
Walt34 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2016, 05:35 PM   #74
Administrator
Gumby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 10,137
18, when I joined the Navy 3 weeks out of high school.
__________________
Living an analog life in the Digital Age.
Gumby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2016, 05:44 PM   #75
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Toronto
Posts: 1,414
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt34 View Post
One of my "aha" moments was working at a gas station in high school. I was evening shift manager supervising 2 or 3 other guys. One of those guys was over fifty years old. I really, really, did not want to become him.
I always had a pretty strong drive to succeed but the summers and Christmas seasons that I spent working in the factory delivered a very solid extra nudge. I am glad to have been instilled with enough grace by my parents have been respectful of those at the factory who offered it to me as a potential permanent gig.
__________________
6miths is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2016, 10:58 PM   #76
gone traveling
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,135
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcowan View Post
. I still firmly believe that over-providing does not generate the independence that should be every parent's objective. Some struggle develops character!

Agree. Completely.
__________________
papadad111 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2016, 12:02 AM   #77
Full time employment: Posting here.
Markola's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 545
No Horatio Alger tale here. I got an education with family help and set out to have a professional career of some kind TBD, eventually finding a productive path for myself at age 27 after some experimentation. Ever since I committed to my field, I've just done the stuff that one does to advance in sizable organizations and have looked for big steps up in title, salary and responsibilities every 2-6 years rather than get comfortable. Mostly, it's worked out, with a couple of setbacks. On balance, I believe that my approach of staying on the move upward has made me tougher, wealthier and more resilient than some friends who did let themselves get comfortable for a decade somewhere and then got the rug pulled out from under them when the organization inevitably changed around them. To answer the OP's question, I am finding FI to be a gradual emergence of increasing options, rather than a sudden arrival, sort of like earning progressive martial arts belts. Lately, at age 50, and after attending a recent retirement party, I have finally been realizing how very much the key for work happiness is to have a great boss whom I really like as a person. That's the kind of boss I strive to be, too. If I've had rough spots, it's when I took a job for career advancement purposes even though I was lukewarm about, or let myself be naively ignorant about, the new boss. I will work a while longer and then FIRE but I will never make the mediocre/aloof/tortured/hypercomptetive-and/or-narcissistic-boss-mistake again, after making it at least twice and paying the price with too much of my happiness. Forget that junk.


Sent from my iPad using Early Retirement Forum
__________________
Markola is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2016, 12:45 AM   #78
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 147
I had entrepreneurial inclinations early on: paper routes starting 6th grade, in middle school dealt excess Playboys we'd find in our father's garage boxes for $5/per... favorite was selling 5 1/4" floppy diskettes full of downloaded Commodore 64 games for $1/game, also 6th grade. Our little operation was revolutionized when we realized you could hole-punch the double-density disks in exactly the right spot to unlock the other side of the disk. That turned what could be a $25 disk into $50 for the extra games packed in. No thought to copyright issues back at 1200 baud rate and 11yrs old, just Caramelos and comic books.

Wasn't actually self-sufficient and on my own until 25yrs due to screwing off in college then staying at home to help/heal in the fallout of DF's suicide while launching myself into software industry. I'm likely among the final group of tech workers who got into Megacorp without a completed degree - got lured out in '98. Hurray for industry experience
__________________
The kids used to call me Captain Slow; now they also use Captain Cheap. I tell them, "Talk to the portfolio!"
growerVon is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2016, 10:11 AM   #79
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Alberta/Ontario/ Arizona
Posts: 3,121
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcowan View Post

So I am willing to cut current parents some slack for providing too much. I still firmly believe that over-providing does not generate the independence that should be every parent's objective. Some struggle develops character!
Depends on your circumstances and that of your kids. Most of us end up giving it to them at some point, either earlier on or upon our passing. Seems better to give at least some of it to them when they can best take advantage if it. Obviously, if the parents' means are modest, any assistance to their kids will reflect this.

I would never try to extrapolate my experience to others. However, clearly some kids stop trying when things are too easy, some kids give up when things are too difficult. Each parent will need to chart their own course. In any event, I doubt the level of parental support is the prime determinant of a kid's personality. Agree we shouldn't "over provide" but I think unnecessary hardship should also be avoided. The definition of "over" is key here. "Some struggle" might develop character but there is plenty of other sources of struggle out there.

Things are indeed pretty difficult for today's kids. Graduating with huge student debt, or living in squalor after graduation might build character for some but might overwhelm others. No one size fits all here.
__________________
Danmar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2016, 11:26 AM   #80
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
kcowan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Pacific latitude 20/49
Posts: 5,705
Send a message via Skype™ to kcowan
I have a single parent friend who has a tendency to over-provide for her 2 kids. One has turned out fine and independent while the other is still having problems.

(The one that is fine is the girl but I would not draw any conclusions just from that.)
__________________

__________________
For the fun of it...Keith
kcowan is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How Many Here Have Experienced a Sustained Net Portfolio Decrease Since Retiring? haha FIRE and Money 50 01-05-2014 08:30 AM
At what age did you become a saver Semiretired2008 FIRE and Money 62 04-30-2013 08:34 AM
Where jobs are created, sustained & economic growth is: Milken Institute study Orchidflower Life after FIRE 0 09-16-2008 10:10 AM
Self-Deprivation Has Become Hip tangomonster Other topics 13 10-19-2007 10:00 PM
How Do you Become a Technical Writer? FinanceDude Other topics 7 08-03-2007 05:12 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:32 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.